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Be an Urban Food Rescuer... Pokemon Go style! [UPDATE: Proof-of-concept demo can be tested worldwide using Kricket app]

Novel "last mile" urban food rescue logistics model using crowdmapping & gamification to engage, educate & empower food rescuers everywhere

Photo of Brian Tang
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ZacSnax seeks to initially establish a crowdsourced and gamified GPS-based mapping platform to facilitate transparency of availability of ripe or imperfect fruit at wet markets, green groceries, farmer's markets, supermarkets restaurants, hotels and caterers across Hong Kong and incentivised citizen collection and delivery of such fruit (think Pokemon Go... for fruit rescue).

Such a system would also engage, educate and empower the young and young-at-heart in the fight against food waste, can be easily replicated in different urban and suburban environments across the world (especially those with smart city initiatives, such as San Francisco, New York or Boston) and adapted for all types of other perishable food rescue (such as bread, vegetables, etc).

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Background - making rescued fruit into healthy snacks for all kids to enjoy

It all started as a 9 year old boy's idea to buy discounted ripe or imperfect fruit from Hong Kong wet markets and supermarkets before they are thrown away, dehydrate the fruit, and make nutritious fruit snacks for kids who can’t afford snacks, or otherwise would have bought unhealthy snacks. 

With the invaluable support of a small award from Kids4Kids Action For A Cause Impact Project Challenge,  ZacSnax was launched in late 2015.  

ZacSnax - Making Rescued Fruit into Healthy Snacks for All Kids To Enjoy

Then we met with Foodlink, an awesome food rescue charity, which kindly offered to provide rescued fruit donated by hotels and caterers to make ZacSnax. This really allowed us to multiply our impact of addressing Hong Kong's food waste and landfill issues, the latter of which capacity will be exhausted by 2018.

ZacSnax's young founder has since been honoured by receiving the Most Innovative Award for the AIA Emerging Entrepreneurs Challenge and Kids4Kids Young Change Makers Award, as well as an award from UNLtd Hong Kong.

Demonstrating and giving away ZacSnax dehydrated rescued fruit snacks to underprivileged children at J Life Foundation in Sham Shui Po

Parents love ZacSnax because it is all natural, with no preservatives, no additives and no colouring. And best of all, kids love the taste of the healthy snacks made from rescued fruit, where a child who consumed one pack consumed one whole fruit! In the meantime, children also learn more about imperfect fruit and feel empowered by being able to do something productive to fight food waste.

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You can hear more directly from ZacSnax's young founder on his original idea




Upgrading ZacSnax to also address food rescue's logistical "last mile" 

However, we soon learned that "traditional" urban food rescue often involves food trucks and call centres that rely on charity dependent models to financially support. This model produces a detrimental carbon footprint and yet still cannot access many potential sources of perishable food, especially within Asian wet markets or high-rise shopping centres. 

We have been inspired both by the rise of ridesharing apps (eg, Uber, GoGo Van) and crowdsourced disaster mapping projects after the Haiti and Fukushima earthquakes, the Kenyan election violence and Phillippines and Jakarta floodings.

But it was the summer success of Pokemon Go that really demonstrated the willingness of over 30 million young and young-at-heart across the world to follow their mobile phone maps to walk purposefully around their cities, and the potential to apply such zeal for capturing pocket monsters to rescuing food waste. 

Consider the following simple process:

(1) "Snap!" a photo of the rescued fruit to "Map!"

If a busy city fruit vendor, restaurateur or hotelier has surplus ripe or imperfect fruit to donate, all he or she would need to do is take a photo on his or her mobile phone, and the online map would immediately show the vendor's location and photo of fruit availability for rescue. The fruit can in the meantime be put in ZacSnax designated boxes for their convenience. These photos help would-be rescuers to understand what and how much is to be picked up, and also the ultimate recipient to verify what is to be received from the food rescuer.  

We are collaborating with existing food charities to extend their existing reach and donor relationships, and there are so many wonderful organizations in the United States and around the world.

We are so pleased to collaborate with Kricket to be able to demonstrate our proof-of-concept (POC). Kricket is a crowdmapping refugee aid, and can also be used to demonstrate this aspect of ZacSnax's food rescue platform. 

Please download Kricket from the App Store to try out this aspect of the user experience - press tag and then take a photo of fruit to be rescued to automatically and anonymously upload the fruit photo onto the map. These photos normally disappear after 24 hours on Kricket, but feel free to screen capture your map and fruit and send it to us together with your feedback! 

We conducted a recent field-test of the app when we visited Hong Kong's Western Wholesale Food Market with charity Ever Green Association, which has a "Food Share We Care" initiative, and as you can see from our screen captures below, there are lots of great fruit to be rescued!  You can see them listed online right now, regardless of where you are in the world. And better still, you can try the app out yourself to "snap!" and "map!" your own neighbourhood!  


Examples of ugly or ripe fruit to be rescued at Western Wholesale Food Market, including bananas, grapes, water melons, mangoes, apples and oranges. Without rescuers, you see some mangoes thrown away already!

(2) "Tap!" to Commit to Rescue the Fruit 

Fruit rescuers young and young-at-heart can learn in real-time on the ZacSnax map of all such fruit availability in the city, and can commit to a time for pick-up and delivery that day at a click of a button. A simple one-time pre-registration is required. 

(a) Fruit rescuers can choose their own travel mode, including on foot, bicycle, public transport (train, bus, tram), ride-sharing and/or private car, and we will seek to collaborate with local public transportation companies to provide incentives and support to food rescuers. 

(b) We will seek to collaborate with corporate fruit rescuers, such as courier companies, logistics and transportation companies, ride-sharing platforms as well as be part of corporate wellness programs to encourage walking and healthy snacking.  

(c) Community groups make great fruit rescuers, including schools, universities, churches, youth organizations, clubs and corporations (including as part of their community volunteering programs). 

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology students involved in a bread run organised by Feeding Hong Kong

(d) We will design food rescue transportation pouches that offer food safety (like the insulated ones used by Food Donation Connection) as well as instant recognition of the worthy registered food rescuers walking around the city - these also offer wonderful opportunities for recognition of corporate and foundation sponsorship support). 

Food Donation Connection's Jim Larson shared FDC's insulated food rescue transportation pouch

(3) Drop-off nodes for redistribution and/or dehydration

Initially, drop-off nodes would be convenient pickup sites for traditional food rescue charities to bring to underserved communities (thereby serving as a "last mile" food rescue solution) or at the charities themselves.

In due course, we hope that nodes would facilitate simple fruit snack dehydration processing. Since food processing licenses are required, we hope to partner with eg, licensed bakeries and cafes to house the dehydrators that will make "surprise packs" of the all natural mixed fruit snacks that address the inconsistent quantities and varieties of rescued fruit supply. Ideally, we also hope to create new jobs for marginalised local communities that may otherwise have difficulty getting jobs. 


(4) Gamification and Big Data

(a) Food donors would have their premises listed on a map (like Pokestops) with their donations being recognised based on amount and type donated - such map listings can generate foot traffic and business and would be of more commercial and tangible value to donors and can augment certifications of good corporate citizenship. Participating food donors can engage in online marketing to announce sales to interested rescuers, sponsor rewards to rescuers and may also get access to data such as their proximity to rescuer locations. 

(b) Food rescuers would be recognised and rewarded depending on eg, amount and type of food delivered and distance travelled. Calorie counts (like in the CityMapper app) could also be added an additional health incentive and measurement. We continue to learn and develop new techniques from eg, Yu-kai Chou's Gamification and Behavioural Design Octalysis framework. 

Octalysis Gamification Framework by Yu-kai Chou

Reward points earned by food rescuers can be redeemed for:

(i) real world rewards (eg, sponsored awards; discount coupons at participating donors and third parties (eg, e-commerce companies); healthy dehydrated fruit snacks); and 

(ii) virtual rewards designed based on Pokemon-like characters inspired by food (initially fruit) that will also educate the young and young-at-heart about food waste and healthy eating. These can be upgraded and are tradeable, and entitle food rescuers to accumulated points for real world and other virtual rewards.

Leaderboards will also motivate food rescuers to compete to rescue more fruit (eg, champion levels between individuals, schools, corporates, districts, clubs, etc). 

We are planning a trial gamification test in conjunction with Zac's school fun fair in November. Students and their parents will be encouraged via the PTA to visit neighbourhood fruit stores and utilise Kricket to "snap" and "map" the location of the fruit being rescued, and then deliver the rescued fruit to school where an offline leaderboard will be tallied to recognise and reward outstanding food rescuers at the individual, class, grade and house levels. The rescued fruit would then be made into healthy snacks to be sold at the school fair for fundraising - so the students would get to taste the fruit they rescued, thereby changing their relationship with their food

We plan to design characters and playability to induce the young and young-at-heart to grow from pocket monster catchers to food rescuers

(5) Innovative sale of healthy all natural fruit snacks

(a) Sales channels - In addition to supermarkets, specialty health stores, school canteens and vending machines, we are exploring the market of subscription-based box healthy snacks models which can be made to families, churches as well as corporate workplaces as part of their wellness programs. 

(b) Pricing and packaging - We are proposing a Tom's Shoe-like 2-for-1 model, where sales of every 2 packets of fruit snacks would result in 1 being given to those who cannot afford it. We propose using environmentally friendly refillable and reusable bags for the disadvantaged communities to reduce packaging waste. 

Healthy snack subscription boxes are a good sales channel for ZacSnax, especially for food rescuers

(6) Scalable impact across different perishable foods and jurisdictions

(a) Application to different perishable foods - ZacSnax started with a focus on fruit rescue. This online-to-offline (O2O) model can also apply to other perishable food in urban centres, such as bread, vegetables and even coffee beans

(b) Application to different jurisdictions - Similarly, while ZacSnax started in Hong Kong, this O2O model can also apply to other urban centres around the world. 

Gamification and online marketing are particularly important elements for food rescue in countries such as Hong Kong, where there is currently no tax deduction nor municipal waste levy to businesses. ZacSnax can be scalable to other such jurisdictions, and can be even more appealing in countries such as the United States which already have these benefits. 

Through the wonderful OpenIDEO community, we have so far found wonderful collaborators to help research Boston, New Jersey/New York and San Francisco, and potentially San Mateo, Karachi, Pakistan, and Abuja, Nigeria for potential chapters in their respective cities. 

(7)  Financially sustainable social enterprise

We aim to create a sustainable enterprise that creates a win-win-win proposition between donors, rescuers and beneficiaries. 

Revenue streams would include online marketing and big data gathering for donors, plus sponsorships and sales of the dehydrated fruit snack. 


Positive reception from stakeholders to date 

(a) Food rescue charities such as Foodlink and Ever Green Association are actively speaking with us on assisting with their "last mile" logistics to their food donors. We have also been invited to join a recently formed Hong Kong government's Social Innovation and Entreprenuership Development Fund Food Support Flagship Project to contribute towards a Hong Kong-wide initiative to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the overall food support service. In fact, gaining funding from sources such as Closed Loop Foundation as part of this OpenIDEO Challenge could be catalytic and allow us to access 1-for-1 matching funding from the SIE Fund. 


(b) The concept of empowering food rescuers seems to resonate well, with great interest from school and church groups. As previously mentioned, we are currently planning a pilot as part of a school fair in late November where students will use the Kricket platform to take photos of fruit they are rescuing and donating to be made into healthy fruit snacks to fundraise for the school, with the gamification elements done offline at the school. 


(c) The idea of combining crowdmapping and gamification to address food waste has captured the imagination of many and won us a lot of support. Even though in concept stage, ZacSnax won a CityTech Award as part of Walk21 Hong Kong organised by the Civic Exchange and the Internet Society of Hong Kong, and we have also been invited to speak at ITCR Forum, Hong Kong's largest information technology forum for NGOs organised by the Hong Kong Council of Social Services (an umbrella organization of over 340 social services organizations) on “Utilizing Mobile Technology to Strengthen Social Service Delivery”. In the meantime, we continue on deliberations regarding the optimal technology platform, eg, Apple IOS and/or Android; whether to join Esri's startup program and/or develop the platform from open source software such as Crowdmap and Open Street Map and/or Google Maps. 

Receiving the CityTech Award from Hong Kong government's undersecretary of the Innovation and Technology Bureau Dr David Chung

What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

We are conducting various concurrent trials, including: - using the Kricket refugee crowdmapping app to demonstrate proof-of-concept - engaging students and parents in fruit rescue using Kricket as part of a school fair - engaging one or more food rescue charities to conduct a trial using Kricket with some established donors and one or more community groups within an identified densely populated location such as Wanchai which has wet markets, supermarkets as well as subway, tram and bus lines

What skills, input or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

Welcome OpenIDEO collaborators on: - crowdmapping software and development experience - gamification to incentivise and engage - food rescue charities on how this platform and approach may help their operations - designers of Pokemon-like characters inspired by food (initially fruit) - on the ground research on local food rescue ecosystems for expanding this idea to different jurisdictions - community leaders who want to engage their communities in food rescue locally

Tell us about your work experience:

Founder of 2 EdTech startups, including Young Makers & ChangeMakers (https://www.facebook.com/YoungMakers.ChangeMakers ), a pioneering inclusive education platform and community which fosters young maker mindsets and 21st century skills through design thinking and maker education. A corporate finance lawyer who has worked in New York, Silicon Valley and Hong Kong on financing technological, social and environmental innovation. Chairman of charity boards and father of ZacSnax founder Zac

This idea emerged from

  • A group brainstorm

How far along is your idea?

  • It was in the works before this challenge – it’s existed for 2-6 months

How would you describe this idea to your grandmother?

A smartphone game to encourage and reward the young and young-at-heart to rescue fruit across our cities and towns that might otherwise be thrown away to make into healthy snacks or given to the poor. This is a healthy solution for both the rescuer walkers and snackers, and helps address the chronic food waste and landfill problem in a financially sustainable way that makes everyone a winner.

[Only for launched ideas] How does your idea differ from what you're already doing?

ZacSnax's 9 year old founder's original idea was to make rescued fruit into healthy snacks for all kids to enjoy. To scale our impact and address a critical issue in food rescue of "last mile" logistics especially in urban centres, we are now focussed on creating a way to engage, educate and empower the young and young-at-heart to be food rescuers, and in the process, transform their relationship with their food.

How is your idea unique to the space?

To augment the current charity food rescue truck and upcycle food waste models, we are hoping to engage andeducate citizens to appreciate food waste and healthy snacking and to empower and motivate them to actively participate in food rescue. Mobile phone technology now allows each individual to provide and learn of real-time mapping co-ordinates of perishable food that may otherwise be wasted, and modern gamification methods provide techniques to incentivise behaviour that benefits one and all.

Who needs to play a role in your idea in order to make it successful?

Food rescue charities have great relationships with food donors that would benefit from this logistics model. Organizations such as schools, universities, churches, clubs and other community groups make great initial volunteer rescuers. Transportation and logistics companies (traditional as well as ride-sharing) would also be great partners for greater distances and volumes. And good software developers and designers are essential to help make the user experience easy and enticing.

How do you plan to measure the impact of your idea?

Impact measurements include: - map and number of fruit donors registered on platform - number of individual fruit rescuers registered on the platform - amount of fruit waste rescued by weight - number and frequency of fruit rescues engaged - sales of dehydrated fruit snacks to sustain the social enterprise - number of pilot collaborations with like-minded individuals and groups in different jurisdictions - increased awareness of food waste issue amongst participants

What are your immediate next steps after the challenge?

Develop a pilot crowdmapping platform with gamification elements in collaboration with one or more food rescue charities and community organization partners to beta-test fruit rescue within a defined geographic area. Identify proximate drop-off nodes where deliveries can be made for dehydration into fruit snacks and/or delivery to charitable beneficiaries.
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Team (25)

Gianni's profile
Brian's profile
Niki's profile
Niki Ramchandani

Role added on team:

"Food rescue champion for New York/ New Jersey"

Emily's profile
Emily Bell

Role added on team:

"Food rescue champion for Boston"

Ahmed's profile
Ahmed null

Role added on team:

"Proponent for involving courier companies"

Francis's profile
Kate's profile
Kate Rushton

Role added on team:

"OpenIDEO Food Waste Champion"

Raghava Manvitha Reddy's profile

"Gamification design idea generator"

marco's profile
Marcos's profile
Anne-Laure's profile
Carlos's profile
Carlos de Santiago

Role added on team:

"Food rescue champion from NY"

Beckie's profile
Beckie Wei

Role added on team:

"Young food rescue champion for San Mateo"

Esther's profile
Esther Li19

Role added on team:

"Young food rescue champion for San Mateo"

Charlotte's profile
Charlotte Hwang

Role added on team:

"Food rescue champion of HK"

Julie's profile
Julie Fineman

Role added on team:

"Food rescue champion from LA restaurants"

Josephine's profile
Josephine Liang

Role added on team:

"Food rescuer pickle and networker queen"

Cameron's profile
Cameron Hanson

Role added on team:

"Food rescuer transport pouch design guru from Parsons"

Amber's profile
Melissa's profile
Melissa Tardiff

Role added on team:

"Food waste child educator"

Megan's profile
Megan Kennedy

Role added on team:

"Employee wellness program guru"

Courtney's profile
Courtney Gonzales

Role added on team:

"Inclusive job creator from rescuing food waste"

Dhananjay's profile
Dhananjay Abhang

Role added on team:

"Discount coupon champ"

No Food Waste's profile
No Food Waste

Role added on team:

"Hunger Crowdmapper"

Aine's profile
Aine Gormley-Gallagher

Role added on team:

"Corporate certificate of recognition champion"

70 comments

Join the conversation:

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Photo of A Bin
Team

Hello Brain, 

I do believe that this is a great idea, it is difficult to change people way of living by trying to reduce their food intake due to many reasons which takes a long time to fix. However, this app taps on the easiest and fastest solution to the problem. Just great. 

All the best

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Many thanks for the kind words A Bin  and Ezgi Sengun  .  Last weekend, I shared Be an Urban Food Rescuer... Pokemon Go style! [UPDATE: Proof-of-concept demo can be tested worldwide using Kricket app] at the InnoASEAN Makers Summit in Singapore, where I was also a guest judge for the SEA Makerthon Grand Finale of young makers from 10 cities presented their projects to address waste across southeast Asia. Received lots of good feedback and support there too! Together, we can make a difference! 

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Dear Be an Urban Food Rescuer... Pokemon Go style! [UPDATE 10/11: Download a proof-of-concept demonstration today via Kricket app!]  team members, thanks so much for your support, ideas and encouragement to date! If you have an iphone, it would be awesome if you can download the Kricket crowdmapping app (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/kricket-crowdmapping-refugee/id961373888?mt=8 )  to try out first-hand how the ZacSnax concept works especially from the donors perspective by taking pictures of fruit or food that can be rescued nearby to you. A rescuer can then easily find such food on the app map too. Please feel free to send us screencaptures of your photos at zacsnax@gmail.com and your thoughts, and we will try to find a way to share it with the community.  Look forward to hearing from you! Thanks so much again Dhananjay Abhang  Kate Rushton Juliana So  Cameron Hanson  Ezgi Sengun  Amber Matthews  Nai Xuan Chen  OpenIDEO  Julie Fineman Hannah Butland Niki Ramchandani Carlos de Santiago  Anne-Laure Fayard Marco Gabriel Ahmed Francis Leye Emily Bell  Julia Koskella Gianni Giacomelli Shane Zhao 

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Oops - missed some of our other great team members: Manvitha Ponnapati Marcos Szrajer marco mihambo Beckie Wei Esther Li19 Josephine Liang  Melissa Tardiff  Megan Kennedy  Courtney Gonzales  josh Singer   - If you have an iphone, it would be awesome if you can download the Kricket crowdmapping app (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/kricket-crowdmapping-refugee/id961373888?mt=8 ) to try out first-hand how the ZacSnax concept works especially from the donors perspective by taking pictures of fruit or food that can be rescued nearby to you. A rescuer can then easily find such food on the app map too. Please feel free to send us screencaptures of your photos at zacsnax@gmail.com and your thoughts, and we will try to find a way to share it with the community. Feel free to get feedback from your friends too, and look forward to hearing from you. Thanks so much again!

Photo of Ezgi Sengun
Team

Hi Brian Tang  thank you for the tag, I have downloaded the app it looks great! Easy to use as well which is always a bonus. 

Hopefully I will be able to put it to use, as I believe not many Australians are aware of this concept. 

Thank you and looking forward to any updates :)

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Awesome feedback on the proof-of-concept Ezgi Sengun - would be so pleased to add Australia as a location to foster food rescuers! Which part of Australia are you located?  (I grew up in Perth!) 

Would really welcome feedback from anyone else who has tried out the POC (pre-gamification) app. And do send us screenshots too of local fruit that can be rescued at zacsnax@gmail.com !  Many thanks! 

Photo of Ezgi Sengun
Team

Oh wow! I am from Sydney :) 

No problems, I will spread the word. Thanks! 

Photo of Mitul Sarkar
Team

It reads really well now, Brian Tang. 
Your app concept, geomapping, route detection of the transporter, plus data on weight of the produce being transported: these should also allow for a calculation of calories burned if transported by bike or walking. For people who love to walk or bike and are into the quantified self movement, here's an extra incentive to do what they love while also rescuing food. Good luck!

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Thanks a lot for the additional incentive idea Mitul Sarkar  ! We just saw calorie count also applied in CityMapper, one of our fellow CityTech Award winners! It is one of the ideas we have in mind, but as per your other question, the issue is cost and time to prototype: the more features, the more costly and time consuming to get to prototype.  It may not be in the first version, but we can certainly do it for future versions. 

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Congratulations on being one of the forty ideas in the refinement phase. 

What is the biggest barrier/hurdle you need to overcome to implement this solution?

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Many thanks Kate Rushton  - my apologies for the delay in responding: we've been busy on the outreach and implementation side of this project!

We have had some great initial discussions with food charities who are interested in trialling a pilot. In fact, as a result of our win last week of the CityTech Award, I have been invited to be a speaker at the largest non-profit information technology forum in Hong Kong organised by the Hong Kong Council of Social Services (an umbrella organization of over 340 social services organizations) in December on Utilizing Mobile Technology to Strengthen Social Service Delivery - this will allow us to outreach to and engage many more food charities. Volunteer groups such as schools, churches and corporates, as well as individuals, also continue to express interest in fielding and being food rescuers. And we continue to refine our ideas and design through collaborations found on the OpenIDEO platform and beyond. 

Our biggest initial challenge is in finalising our technology platform.  We have had some great initial expressions of support from major geographic information systems (GIS) companies such as Esri (which has kindly suggested that we join their start up program which will give us 3 years free access to their software), to open data developers who are keen to help us use open source mapping tools, including other awardees of the CityTech Award. 

Receiving a grant from Closed Loop Foundation would allow us to expand our reliance on volunteer developers and to pay dedicated developers and UX designers to complete the technology platform in a timely fashion. Best of all, with such a grant, there is the possibility of recveiving a matching one-for-one grant from the Hong Kong government's Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship Development Fund (SIE Fund). 

We hope that more and more people can also see the potential of such a platform that can educate, engage and empower food rescuers through a sustainable social enterprise that offers an urban "last mile" solution, and join us to help make this a reality to address the terrible food waste issues that plague our cities and our planet!  

Photo of Mitul Sarkar
Team

How much $ would it take to have a working and debugged app, Brian?

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Hi Mitul Sarkar , that is exactly what we are exploring now, and it really depends on lots of factors. For example, refugee crowdmapping Kricket is based on Mapbox and Open Street Maps for IOS, and we met with the app developer of Swapit and their crowdmapping marketplace is based on Google Maps for Android. And Esri has a crowdmapping platform too. So we are doing further research to make a call on which platform to use - we are so lucky to have met some amazing app developers who want to collaborate with us and this initiative! 

Photo of Dhananjay Abhang
Team

Hello Brian, thank you for appreciating my idea to incentivize donors with discount coupons. I can see two main challenges in your model 1. establishing low cost, low carbon footprint and quick logistics 2. incentivizing donors
I think tie-up with existing companies having door to door service will be logical and smartest way to expand your network. E.g. e-commerce companies. You can have tie-ups at different levels with these companies i. Online tie-up where they can post their food waste ii. Logistics partnership iii. branding partnership ( In this case you can prepare a standard design of packaging and offer space for branding to different companies. This will help you to recover the cost and make your model self-sustainable).               
The second challenge which is incentivizing the donors can be worked out by tie-ups with e-commerce companies by offering discount coupons. Donors can accumulate some points based on amount of food donated. Some method needs to be developed for this. This coupons can be used for shopping or any thing else which you include(depends on consumer psychology and market.)
                                                                                          

 

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Thanks a lot Dhananjay Abhang . We had built in "sponsored awards" and collaborations with transportation companies under "corporate fruit rescuers" but will make it clearer. On "standard design of packaging", that is the proposed transportation pouches we are designing. Did you have something else in mind?  Would be great to collaborate! 

Photo of Juliana So
Team

Great idea to rescue fruits in HK! Perhaps the fruit rescuers can get a pack of the dehydrated fruit they brought in, instead of just "playing the game"? ;)

And I wonder what category tops the food waste list. Is it fruit or meat/fish? Because fruits seem to last a bit longer than fresh meat... Would be great to see restaurants/cafes renting out their spaces in late nights for "food waste supper kitchen", foods thrown away by supermarkets/F&B outlets can be made into delicious supper for those who work till very late, and a chance for people who love cooking to share their passion!

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Thanks a lot @Juliana So ! In fact, one of the initial rewards from points gains by food rescuers would be packs of the dehydrated fruit snack! I guess we should make this clearer.

There do exist some charities who do open kitchens to cook such surplus food for the poor (eg, Food Angels in Hong Kong). Fruit is not generally cooked, though, and not only can discoloration or "ugly fruit" put some people off, but it is often a pain to get kids (and adults too!) to eat their fruit. These are the issues we hope to address! 

Where are you based? Would you be willing to join us to be an urban food rescuer?? ;) 

Photo of Cameron Hanson
Team

Great idea! I've been working on a similar project in New York City called GoodFill that aims to make more accessible food that is edible but no longer sellable. It's a take on freeganism and focuses on redesigning a trash bag to make food rescuing easier on New York streets. The gamification and geo-location of your project would be a great complement! Would love to chat. Check us out at http://newchallenge.newschool.edu/projects/goodfill/ or email me at hanson.cameron @ gmail.com

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

GoodFill sounds like a fascinating project - thanks so much for reaching out Cameron Hanson  !

As you can see from our photo above, we have connected with organizations like Food Donation Connection to learn more about their food rescue transportation pouches, which are 12 gallons large and insulated for use mainly for prepared food: http://www.harvestsupport.org/donationres.html .  Would be great to collaborate with you as MFA Transdisciplinary Design at Parsons School of Design in New York to brainstorm what design works best esp for perishable fruit initially.  I believe that if well designed, we should be able to approach sponsors to finance the manufacture of these for food rescue in Hong Kong, New York and beyond! 

Photo of Ezgi Sengun
Team

Great idea! You could possibly look at a fellow openideo Chad Knutsen for the dehydration process.

https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/refinement/our-sustainable-dehydration-turns-post-harvest-food-waste-into-profits-for-producers-and-nutrition-for-people

Photo of Brian Tang
Team

Many thanks Ezgi Sengun  ! 

Thanks for the referral to Sustainable, Smart Dehydration Technologies Are Taking A Big Bite Out Of Food Waste!  - as I understand it, Chad Knutsen , your focus is initially not on consumers. We currently use tabletop sized consumer (rather than industrial) grade dehydrators which seem to take a similar amount of time as your demo, and do not need the rehydration that your product offers. Also, as the PS coating is a powdered additive, I fear that it may raise the need for food regulatory approval whereas our current ZacSnax dehydrated fruit snack is all natural with no additives and  preservatives.  Chad Knutsen - have you made inquiries with the food authorities about the need for approval of this additive and/or received such approval yet? Many thanks! 

Photo of Chad Knutsen
Team

Indeed, we are focussed primarily on a B2B model at this time, but we intend to branch out eventually. 

Our process and PS Coating is 100% natural, GMO free, and GRAS approved. Also, as there is a less than 1% coating applied, it does not generally need to even be listed on a final product as there is no effect whatsoever beyond that the food is dehydrated, and retains 100% of its nutritional content. PS Coating meets or exceeds any regulatory requirements from the FDA or USDA.

Our process does not require any special equipment for home use, beyond a secure, clean place for food to sit and dry and have a fan blowing on it. 

Thank you for your question!

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Thanks a lot Chad Knutsen  - so beyond a fan (regular or industrial sized?), is there no heating element at all required like other dehydrators? Is that a PVC housing you have in your video? How might this need to be modified in humid environments like we have across Asia? 

Finally, do you have or plan to seek FDA and/or USDA certifications for the PS coating? 

Many thanks ! 

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Great way to eat healthy and stay healthy.

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Many thanks for your kind words Amber Matthews  ! Would you be interested in exploring rolling out this project at UC Irvine? ;) 

Photo of Amber Matthews
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I just graduated tho

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Ah! If you think you have a circle or network of parties who are interested in engaging in food rescue, then we welcome researchers and beta testers! ;) 

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Just few questions. The first is how to build trust between donors and rescuers? And how to make sure the quality and safety of food? The last is how to get what you want or find the rescuers want your food as soon as possible?

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Thanks for the great questions Nai Xuan Chen .

1. Trust between donors and rescuers - Donors take a photo of each donation, which provides transparency of the fruit and the amount donated that needs to get to the final destination. Rescuers are pre-registered on the platform, so when they commit to rescue on the day and then appear at the donor's premises, the donor can verify the rescuer's identity and commitment before releasing the perishable food. We plan to create ZacSnax boxes and/or transport pouches (like used by Food Donation Connection - see photo), which can be subsidized through sponsorship, that can ease the collection of fruit as well as identification of and transportation by rescuers. 

2. Quality and safety of food - this is mitigated by initially tapping the network of food rescue organizations who have gotten comfortable with the source of food donations. In addition, because our initial focus is on fruit, it is easier to identify (externally and internally) whether they are already rotten and not usable. Our platform will allow for reviews of both donors and rescuers by each other (still deciding if these will be public or only for admin), and if certain donors continuously provide inappropriate food, they would be dropped from the network.

3. Identifying donors and rescuers - In relation to donors, we propose initially working closely with food rescue charities. Food rescue is a very local activity, and there are often many great organizations already working to rescue food and have great relationships with food donors in cities across the world. Rather than reinvent the wheel, we want to augment their operations and reach through this "last mile" distribution method. Donors will have their retail operations appear on the map when they donate, which will help them generate branding and foot traffic for their businesses. In relation to rescuers, we will initially work with community organisations such as schools, churches and corporate wellness and CSR programs to ensure a faster rollout and rightminded goodwill. As part of the ZacSnax dehydrated fruit snack offerings, we would have Fruit Surprise Packs - because we may not have consistency of supply of certain fruit due to the nature of urban food rescue (as opposed to rescuing directly from farms), buyers of the fruit snacks would get a surprise mix of dehydrated fruit where they can even play guessing games of what fruit each piece is! 

With this model, we hope to work with more fellow passionate collaborators such as many we already have met via OpenIDEO  for roll out in other cities and towns.  Presenting at Walk21 this week also allowed us to reach global proponents of walkability who favour addressing other UN Global Sustainable Development Goals of low carbon cities, and even more potential collaborators! 

I hope that helps answer your questions. Welcome your support and involvement! 

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Welcome to the Refinement phase Brian! We've added new Refinement questions to your original submission that we'd love for you to answer. Please check out the Refinement Phase Toolkit for instructions on how to answer the new questions and other recommendations we encourage all idea teams to consider in the upcoming weeks.

Refinement Phase Toolkit: http://ideo.pn/2du9sf7

Lastly, here's a useful tip: When you update the content of your post, it'd be helpful to indicate this in your idea title by adding an extension. For example, you can add the extension " - Update: Experience Maps 09/28" to you idea title. This will be a good way to keep people informed about how your idea is progressing!

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Hi Brian, we updated the link to the Refinement Toolkit. Please use this new link instead! https://d3gxp3iknbs7bs.cloudfront.net/attachments/bda1f109-0466-4f8e-9699-1359e406df56.pdf

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Many thanks OpenIDEO  ! My apologies, we have been snowed under preparing for the CityTech Award presentation last night, and we were announced as a top 5 winner !  

Have now posted answers to the Refinement questions and will engage much more with the OpenIDEO community in the coming days of our idea refinement. 

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Awesome gasification plans.  There def is synergy with Peak Plate.  I'd love your feedback/input.  Check it out: https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/feedback/peak-plate-digital-platform-transforms-the-food-supply-chain

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Hi Julie Fineman , Peak Plate Digital Platform Transforms the Food Supply Chain.  sounds like a great initiative and would love to find ways to collaborate. In the first instance, we are seeking on the ground research on the food rescue ecosystem in different cities and it looks like you are already doing it for San Francisco, which is great!  

BTW - was the reference to "gasification" an erroneous cut and paste, or an oblique reference to what may happen if one were to consume too much of our dehydrated fruit?? ;) 

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Hi Brian Tang 
The reference was an erroneous cut & paste, though your sense of humor is welcomed!!  Thank you for the catch.

Serdar Copur is on the Peak Plate team with gamification skills from his extensive history leading the mobile app division at Disney, +++. Our pilot launch will be void of gaming for now as we're using lean methodology to refine our market fit.  

Let's figure a way to collaborate as it's already happening through the world-wide community of Open IDEOs Food Waste Challenge! Fundraising director of FoodLinkFoundation.org, Charlotte Hwang  , has invited me to come and speak to her community in Hong Kong.

You and Charlotte are welcome to adopt my survey questions and conduct on-the-ground as well as on-line surveys in Hong Kong.  You can use the URL's for the surveys I created on Survey Monkey for the: Diner, Farmer, and Chef. As I mentioned, I sent it through all my social media channels as well as my groups on Linkedin.  You can print each one out for when you hit the pavement.  Glean those questions posted on September 12, under the title, "Peak Plate: Transparency = Less Food Waste.  Do You Agree."  

I'll keep the survey up for a couple months and I will share the results with you and Charlotte on a weekly basis.  

Work for you?  Charlotte?

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Sounds great and small world!  When are you due to visit Hong Kong? 

Photo of Hannah Butland
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Hi Brian,
I’m very interested in this idea of taking imperfect fruit, dehydrating it for preservation, then giving them to kids who can’t afford healthy snacks. The mere fact this idea was made by a 9 year-old boy amazes me. OpenIDEO is all about connecting people and their ideas because anyone could have the next world changing idea, even a 9 year-old boy. I would love to see this company grow even bigger. Using fruit, that otherwise would be thrown away, and making better use of it, that is an idea that sells. A Pokemon Go style app for fruit is not an idea that sells, to me atleast. First you would have to get vendors on board with donating their fruit which loses them profit. Vendors would then have to take time to take pictures and post on your app, which for them seems like work without benefit. Next you would have to interest “rescuers” to want to go out and find vendors who are giving away bad fruit. It’s a great idea to help food waste but you should consider how to engage consumers to want to help this cause. Unfortunately a majority of the population is only interested in doing what benefits them and I don’t see how this app benefits the “rescuer.” I suggest focusing on the stock and flow of ZacSnax and growing the company because that will have a better impact on lessening food waste. This app is a good idea but I see some flaws in the marketing prospect. I enjoyed reading your ideas there is definite potential. Good Luck in your work!

Sincerely, Hannah Butland

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Dear Hannah Butland , many thanks for your kind words and honest feedback - that is how ideas get refined and improve!  

The idea of volunteer fruit/food rescuers was driven in part by the success we see of bread runs organised by food rescue charities in Hong Kong (eg, http://www.foodlinkfoundation.org/header-links/get-involved/corporate-volunteers.html ; http://feedinghk.org/bread-run/ ).  Are those common in the US? 

The hope is that gamification can help incentivise those that may not start with altruism in mind: whether it is through virtual rewards that may appeal to younger rescuers (such as collecting and upgrading digital characters/tokens like Pokemon Go) and/or real-world rewards (such as discounts at participating donors, sponsored giveaways etc).  

Why would food donors participate? By definition, they normally throw away such perishable fruit/food - our platform would help raise positive awareness and literal foot traffic to their stores, and for the perishable fruit/food that does not quite qualified as needing rescue yet, they may offer them at discounted prices to the world-be rescuers (a win-win for both parties concerned). And in the US, we understand that they would also qualify for enhanced tax deduction. We hope to collaborate with existing local food rescue charities and chapters to help reach out to their existing roster of food donors, and the technology will also hopefully allow them to scale their impact by reaching out beyond existing known food donors.  To the extent there are instances of limited private fruit/food rescuers, the food rescue charities can step in. 

The gamification can also serve to educate kids about fruit/food rescue and healthy eating, and at the same time promote the brand of the dehydrated fruit snacks that would operate in a Toms Shoe-like model to also benefit those who cannot afford the dehydrated fruit snacks.  So the kids benefit from getting educated, engaged and empowered where even the act of buying the dehydrated fruit helps someone else who cannot afford such healthy snacks. 

Would sincerely welcome any further thoughts, questions and ideas you may have, especially on the marketing aspect you mention - thanks again! 

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Hello! Brian Tang! please may you visit this idea https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/ideas/urban-mushroom-farms-network-for-turning-wastes-into-oyster-mushrooms and advise accordingly for further improvement

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When thinking about contacting local food rescuer's, I remember seeing that Carlos de Santiago  runs a food rescue in NYC. Carlos, can you comment on this model as well as An app connecting those in need with those with excess food via GPS technology  and let us know if your organization may be open to piloting a form of this idea?

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Many thanks Niki Ramchandani ! Carlos de Santiago  - welcome your thoughts on our Be an Urban and Suburban Food Donor and Rescuer... Pokemon Go style! project too plse! ;) 

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Hi Niki Ramchandani and Brian Tang ! Happy to help with piloting, Food Rescue NYC is more of a community than an organization. Our group goes out and rescues food that is on its way to or often already in the garbage, mostly for self-consumption since we don't have much carrying capacity(we carry everything ourselves). If you're looking to tap into a group of people that is actively looking for food to rescue, I can definitely help :)

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Awesome Carlos de Santiago - that is what we are exactly looking for!  

Would be great to learn more from you about the New York food rescue ecosystem (see initial list of questions in our post to Emily Bell ), and how food donors (like at farmers markets and groceries) and your Food Rescue NYC food rescuers on foot and via subway can be incentivised to help get perishable food to local nodes to benefit those who need them, and maybe also "upcycled" into dehydrated snacks, juices, etc to reduce waste and promote sustainable eating.  

Would you also be willing to connect with members of your circle to test such an online platform/app in New York? 

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Brian, thanks for inviting me to check your idea. I love the original concept and find really interesting how you're planning to expand it with geo-mapping and gamification.
I am wondering if there could be way of prototyping the idea without even developing an app - for example using an existing app like snapchat. 
I'm also wondering who are you imaging your fruit rescuers to be. What age range?
Good luck with this project!

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Many thanks for your kind words Anne-Laure Fayard  !  

There are existing software platforms that we are exploring to prototype (see Kricket, CrowdMap) and are examining how much extra functionality should be added for the prototype (most do not have the gamification elements). 

As for the target age group, we looked towards the Pokemon Go type demographics (see slides), and are hearing feedback from the teams for DFA NYU  and Food Connection-An app to send out extra food to the community in order to prevent food wasting  that suggest that high school students may be a stronger initial target audience as food rescuers than university students (although maybe the humanities students can step up and suggest otherwise). Yet we also hear from parties like Carlos de Santiago  who demonstrate that there are "grown up" New Yorkers who may also be willing to help out as food rescuers ! 

The wonderful thing about this OpenIDEO platform is that it allows us to connect with others around the world from all walks of life who care and may be willing and able to step forward to try to do something positive together for our own local communities, and at the same time try to make a positive impact on an international scale. So we welcome one and all ! 

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Hello Brian!
Congratulation for your Great idea! Keep it up

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Many thanks Marco Gabriel ! Would you be willing to help us do research on the food rescue ecosystem in Tanzania to see if our idea could be expanded there? That would be great! 

Photo of Ahmed null
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How about incorporating the vehicles of DHL, FedEx an other couriers to transport the items between any two convenient points?

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We can do that, but who will pay for it?

Also, I presume Karachi markets may be similar to those in Hong Kong and elsewhere in Asia -  it is difficult for vehicles to go to individual shops...  but not food rescuers on foot, on a bicycle or on a motorcycle.  

That is part of the "secret sauce" of this idea - individuals being educated, engaged and empowered to be urban food rescuers. 

In addition to pedestrians and cyclists, in certain markets, urban food rescuers may also use their motor vehicles, and maybe ride-sharing drivers too (such as from Pakistan's Savaree).  If we can get a courier company to be a sponsoring participant, all the better! 

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DHL has launched the parcelstation concept which i believe you already know. I was thinking to get benefit of that and the DHL can be made a partner for global stability for which they always strive!

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Hi Tang: May be the merging of our ideas yields a more comprehensive one!

https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/ideas/food-wastes-mapia

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That is great Ahmed  - where are you based?

I think for food rescue we need to think globally and act locally. We are already in discussion with various crowdmapping platforms to pilot this. It would be fantastic if you are willing to initially help with the on-the-ground research on your local food rescue scene as listed for Emily Bell .  

Would be great to gather more support in the final hours of this stage of the challenge ! 

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Hi Tang:

I am based in Karachi Pakistan.

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Great - welcome any on the ground research you may be willing to provide! 

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Hi Brian Tang! I love your perspective on the gamification of foods as games play a big role in Big Data space which will lead to a successful crowdmapping. Let me know any ways we can collaborate. Thumbs up!

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Many thanks Francis Leye  ! It would be fantastic if you would be willing to initially help with the on-the-ground research on your local food rescue scene in Nigeria as listed for Emily Bell . 

Would be great to also gather more support in the final hours of this stage of the challenge - many thanks ! 

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Great to see that our idea seems to have inspired (directly or indirectly) How might we gamify food waste?  and Poke Shop ! 

Emily Bell and Christine  , would you like to collaborate with us? You seem to be on the West and East coasts of the US respectively, and with US tax deduction possibilities highlighted by Julia Koskella , our idea may gain faster traction amongst food donors in the US.  We are already in discussions with crowdmapping developers whose mapping reach applies worldwide. 

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Brian Tang My teammates and i would love to collaborate/learn more about your idea. How can we be most helpful to you?

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That would be great Emily Bell  !  Perhaps a first step may be if you and your How might we gamify food waste?  team help Applaud our project? ;) 

We are seeking collaborators who are interested in piloting our project as chapters in their respective cities (especially in the US with its enhanced tax deduction regime) by eg, reaching out to food rescue organizations who already have contacts with perishable food donors and beneficiaries, contributing ideas and sponsor contacts on appropriate local rewards, etc

Another way would be to test out eg the Kricket app for your views of it as a platform to pilot our project in our respective cities. 

We can draft a list of design research tasks for each interested city chapter lead and welcome your input. For food rescue, I think we need to think globally and act locally ! 

Might you be willing to collaborate in this manner too Niki Ramchandani  ?

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Thanks for connecting all of us Brian Tang  and for your enthusiasm on this topic! I'll start looking into food rescuers in my area (NJ-NY). It would be great to have a short summary of how the program is run already and then there can be discussions on how it can be adapted to meet the particular needs of areas over here. One overarching thought is that this is a great idea but it can be even more impactful if we expand it in a few areas. 1) Let's go beyond only perishable food. Some people throw away non-perishable food if they realize they don't like the the taste of a new frozen food they purchased in bulk, are moving and don't want to take their canned food with them, etc. 2) (which is related) I think that we can target it beyond just fruit and for kids. This has the potential to reach all sorts of people for all kinds of food. 3) I think the gamification piece is great for kids (and possible adults who have gotten into the pokemon craze). Allowing this to be an optional component of the app, and not the main attraction would bring in more people. What are your thoughts on these preliminary adaptations for the US urban market?

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Many thanks Niki Ramchandani  - it started out as my son's fairly simple and elegant idea working with local food rescue organizations, but in an effort to try to scale its impact and address some of the issues encountered in execution, Dad got much more involved  ;)

I totally agree with your thoughts that it can be expanded beyond perishable food, but I think we need to focus on a successful pilot before trying to be all things to all people. Perishable food also tends to be lighter than canned or frozen food for people to transport.

You should note that COPIA:Sharing excess food  already has a great app which connects excess food with those in need. What we are trying to solve is the current reliance (and carbon footprint) of what Copia calls "food heroes" ( https://gocopia.com/#/  ), namely the food rescue truck drivers that most if not all food rescue organization such as Marv Zauderer 's Extrafood.org in Marin currently have to employ (and fundraise to support).  

How does one motivate volunteers to do more, such as the actual rescued food delivery? I used to chair our office's charity committee so I have some idea, and I believe that gamification, recognition and some incentives hold the key. Pokemon Go this summer mainly demonstrated that individuals can be motivated to walk/travel purposefully around their cities, and if we can obtain local sponsorships for more tangible rewards (to augment those driven by virtual gaming upgrades), that can be a win-win-win for all concerned. 

Great to have you help cover New Jersey/New York (my old stomping ground) ! 

Will revert soon with more details, and in the meantime, welcome your further thoughts 

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Brian Tang we're on it!

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Awesome Emily Bell !

As an initial list of questions, would be great to know for each relevant city/town (in your case Boston?):

(1) what are the food rescue organizations that operate in your city/town? Which ones focus more on perishables? 

(2) do the food rescue organizations use their own food trucks, or rely on volunteer deliveries?

(3) do the food rescue organizations already use an online platform to connect donors and those in need?

Once the above is determined from third party research, maybe the pertinent food rescue organizations can be approached to ask:

(a) would the food rescue organizations be interested in utilising an online platform? 

(b) would the food rescue organizations be interested in helping tap citizen volunteers to do food rescue as opposed to relying on trucks? 

(c) do the food rescue organizations utilise enhance tax deduction to incentivise donors? 

Welcome any comments to the above list, and also welcome any other team members to spearhead for chapters in different cities/ towns ! 

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This OpenIDEO platform is great ! Just learned about Freshspire  , Buymeby  and In$tprice - Instant & Dynamic Pricing for Perishables  , as well as Toast Ale: delicious craft beer, brewed from surplus bread  and DayOld: A secondary market for surplus baked goods!   - each addressing the critical  issue of perishable food at the retailer level.
One query we had related to the level of retailer acceptance of the "discount food" model for fear of cannibalising their regular sales and pricing  (which partly explains many of them historically throwing such food away) . This may differ across jurisdictions, and is changing. 

While the original focus of ZacSnax relates to perishable surplus or imperfect fruit, it is essentially proposing a new online/offline (O2O) distribution and logistics model that also promotes healthy eating and citizen engagement and education to address food waste. And unlike Pokemon Go, there is no 20 miles/ hour limit, and so urban food rescuers can also use their own cars, public transport and/or ride sharing !

We look forward to learning more from and collaborating with the above and other interested parties ! 

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Hi Brian, one interesting policy in the USA is IRS - section 170 - enhanced deduction.  It incentivises donating food to food banks or other redistribution channels by allowing you to claim half of your product margin as a loss. So if you produce milk at a cost of $3, and sell it at $4, if you throw it away you can only claim the loss of $3.  However if you donate it, you can claim the loss of $3.50. That is one incentive in that market, although if anyone pays for the surplus food you cannot claim enhanced deduction. This could apply to your idea of reclaiming perishable surplus fruit from supermarkets. Good luck!

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Thanks a lot for your thoughts Julia Koskella  !  You are right that it could be a great help for supermarkets (less so for wet markets which are still often in the cash economy). Would love to know from the OpenIDEO community which other jurisdictions provide for this enhanced tax deduction. 

Alas, Hong Kong does not even have a good samaritan law - again, would love to know from the OpenIDEO community which other jurisdictions provide for good samaritan laws to protect food donors. 

Hong Kong just held its Legislative Council elections on the weekend. Any feedback on the extent of such enhanced tax deduction and good samaritan policies in other jurisdictions would be invaluable... we can then see if there is any political will to address some of these policy matters. 

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Very nice! Good synergy with the "pallet to pellet" idea too! https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/ideas/pallet-to-pellet-reroute-waste-at-retailer-s-warehouse-level

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Agreed Gianni Giacomelli !  Solving last mile logistics can be challenging, but by pulling together relevant stakeholders and appropriate gamification and incentives for motivation (as demonstrated by the success of Pokemon Go), we can help address the issue of food waste in urban and suburban areas. 

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Great to see ZacSnax in the Ideas phase Brian! We knew it was a matter of time before someone brought Pokemon Go to food waste management:) Are you currently planning to launch the ZacSnax platform/ app in Hong Kong?

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Haha - many thanks Shane Zhao  !  We were actually inspired by  online food rescue models like COPIA:Sharing excess food  and crowdmapping software used for disaster relief, but the launch of Pokemon Go this summer  certainly demonstrated the willingness of people to walk purposefully around our urban streets. 

We are currently in discussions with organisations like food rescue charity Foodlink Foundation, One Meal at a Time , GIS companies , and the open data community on initiating a pilot in Hong Kong, and would welcome all thoughts/ ideas/ leads/ support !