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The global population food need forever by 2030

Find solutions to the global population food need forever by 2030

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Lead Applicant Organization Name

My full name: Dr Michel Tia,CEO, All Party System Co.(From Ivory Coast i am currently based,I work All Party System Co.

Lead Applicant Organization Type

  • Other

If part of a multi-stakeholder entity (i.e. team), provide the names of other organizations and types of stakeholders collaborating with you.

Regular Executives: Election Totals History and Original TEN FOUNDERS (August 10th, 2014) President Jen Kiran [Middle Way] Vice President/IP Senator Dr Brig General Lord Buck Rogers [Conservative] Secretary/IP Senator James Ogle [One] Treasurer Nadine Squires [One] Ethics & Grievances Jeffrey Drobman [Democratic] Founding Executives: Blank Eballot Election Totals Secretary General IP Senator Frank-Michael Hensel [NWP] Germany (8/29/2015) IP Senator Ivon Ramzi [Info. Not Avail.] Italy (4/29/2018) IP Senator Laura Frustaci [Info. Not Avail.] Italy (4/29/2018) President Nadine Squires (AKA Kwan Tera) [One] (1/28/2019) IP Senator Jennifer Naidu [Women Empowerment and Education] India (6/6/2018) IP Senator Dr. Hatham Durbie [Humanity] Lebanon (6/6/2018) IP Senator Turkan Ergor [Peace] Turkey (5/2/2018) Chief Executive Officers (CEO) CEO IP Senator Dr Brig General Lord Buck Rogers [Conservative] (1/1/2020 to 12/31/2020) ,CEO IP Senator Daniel Davenport

Website of Legally Registered Entity

(www.allpartysystem.com)

How long have you / your team been working on this Vision?

  • 3-10 years

Lead Applicant: In what city or town are you located?

I am currently based in Abidjan.

Lead Applicant: In what country are you located?

United States of America

Your Selected Place: what’s the name of the Place you’re developing a Vision for?

Our vision for the whole world citizens.I am base in Abidjan and i am working in network with my team .The organization is in Pacific Grove.

What country is your selected Place located in?

Cote d'Ivoire(Ivory Coast)

Describe your relationship to the place you’ve selected.

This place is selected , because is my home country and i need my home population inhabitants to be well nurtured and profit of the program of fooding proposed by the Rockefeller Foundation.I ma connected to it.

Describe the People and Place: Provide information that would be helpful for an outsider who has never been there and may have no context about this Place to better understand the area.

Côte d’Ivoire had been a magnet for settlement of peoples from neighboring West African areas now constituting Burkina Faso, Mali, Guinea, Liberia, and Ghana since pre-colonial times. It became a French colony in 1893 and comprised a population of 1,959,360 people in 1901. Côte d’Ivoire possessed fertile and uncultivated agricultural land, but had low population density. The French therefore began to forcibly recruit laborers from neighboring colonies for resettlement in Côte d’Ivoire. The largest source of manual laborers was in Haute Volta (Upper Volta), now Burkina Faso, which became a French colony in 1919. In 1932, France annexed part of Haute Volta to the land mass of Côte d’Ivoire. This facilitated the mass forced recruitment of Burkinabè to work on major projects, like the rail line between Abidjan and Ouagadougou .and ports in Côte d’Ivoire, as well as develop Côte d’Ivoire’s cocoa and coffee plantation economy. Although the colonial system of forced labor was abolished in 1946 and Haute Volta became again a distinct French colony in 1947, the number of Burkinabè migrants resettling to Côte d’Ivoire steadily grew in the decades to come.During the first 20 years of his administration, Ivory Coast witnessed remarkable economic growth, recording consistent annual GDPs of more than seven percent. Economic growth arose mainly from the sale of cocoa and coffee, two of Ivory Coast’s major export crops. HouphouëtBoigny combined economic policies with shrewd politics that emphasized dialogue and compromise among Ivory Coast’s various ethnic groups. To alleviate fears of political domination by one ethnic group, he introduced a system of ethnic quotas within government institutions. As a result, Ivory Coast maintained a relatively stable political and civil profile by most African standards. Ivory Coast’s cocoa and coffee plantations relied on immigrant labourers, who were first brought into the country by French colonialists. To ensure that these labourers remained in Ivory Coast following independence, Houphouët-Boigny extended their right to live and work in the country. Furthermore, he introduced liberal land ownership laws that were favourable to immigrants, resulting in large immigrant settlements in the country.In the 1990s, a number of factors, including the introduction of a multiparty system and the economic crisis caused by the fall in coffee and cocoa prices, began to exacerbate xenophobic tension. This tension centred around the concept of “ivoirité”, underlined in article 35 of the Constitution Since then, the country’s history has been punctuated by violent events, starting with the overthrow of President Henri Konan Bédié in a military coup on 24 December 1999 and followed by an armed conflict that virtually split the country into two opposing parties: the north, more or less controlled by the rebels, and the south, which remained in the hands of supporters of President Laurent Gbagbo. The violent conflicts that have arisen in Côte d’Ivoire since the late 1990s have primarily been related to elections.

Challenges: Describe the current (2020) and the future (2050) challenges that your food system faces.

Project aim: to explore the pressures on the global food system between now and 2050 and identify the decisions that policy makers need to take today, and in the years ahead, to ensure that a global population rising to nine billion or more can be fed sustainably2 and equitably. The global food system will experience an unprecedented confluence of pressures over the next 40 years. On the demand side, global population size will increase from nearly seven billion today to eight billion by 2030, and probably to over nine billion by 2050; many people are likely to be wealthier, creating demand for a more varied, high-quality diet requiring additional resources to produce. On the production side, competition for land, water and energy will intensify, while the effects of climate change will become increasingly apparent. The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to a changing climate will become imperative. Over this period globalisation will continue, exposing the food system to novel economic and political pressures. Any one of these pressures (‘drivers of change’) would present substantial challenges to food security; together they constitute a major threat that requires a strategic reappraisal of how the world is fed. Overall, the Project has identified and analysed five key challenges for the future. Addressing these in a pragmatic way that promotes resilience to shocks and future uncertainties will be vital if major stresses to the food system are to be anticipated and managed.

Address the Challenges: Describe how your Vision will address the challenges described in the previous question.

The five challenges:A. Balancing future demand and supply sustainably – to ensure that food supplies are affordable. B. Ensuring that there is adequate stability in food supplies – and protecting the most vulnerable from the volatility that does occur. C. Achieving global access to food and ending hunger. This recognises that producing enough food in the world so that everyone can potentially be fed is not the same thing as ensuring food security for all. D. Managing the contribution of the food system to the mitigation of climate change. E. Maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services while feeding the world.These last two challenges recognise that food production already dominates much of the global land surface and water bodies, and has a major impact on all the Earth’s environmental systems. In recognising the need for urgent action to address these future challenges, policy-makers should not lose sight of major failings in the food system that exist today. Although there has been marked volatility in food prices over the last two years, the food system continues to provide plentiful and affordable food for the majority of the world’s population. Yet it is failing in two major ways which demand decisive action: ●● Hunger remains widespread. 925 million people experience hunger: they lack access to sufficient of the major macronutrients (carbohydrates, fats and protein). Perhaps another billion are thought to suffer from ‘hidden hunger’, in which important micronutrients (such as vitamins and minerals) are missing from their diet, with consequent risks of physical and mental impairment. These last two challenges recognise that food production already dominates much of the global land surface and water bodies, and has a major impact on all the Earth’s environmental systems. In recognising the need for urgent action to address these future challenges, policy-makers should not lose sight of major failings in the food system that exist today. Although there has been marked volatility in food prices over the last two years, the food system continues to provide plentiful and affordable food for the majority of the world’s population. Yet it is failing in two major ways which demand decisive action: ●● Hunger remains widespread. 925 million people experience hunger: they lack access to sufficient of the major macronutrients (carbohydrates, fats and protein). Perhaps another billion are thought to suffer from ‘hidden hunger’, in which important micronutrients (such as vitamins and minerals) are missing from their diet, with consequent risks of physical and mental impairment. In contrast, a billion people are substantially over-consuming, spawning a new public health epidemic involving .chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Much of the responsibility for these three billion people having suboptimal diets lies within the global food system.Many systems of food production are unsustainable

High Level Vision: With these challenges addressed, now provide a high level description of how the Place and the lives of its People will be different than they are now.

Decisive action that needs to take place now:The response of the many different actors involved will affect the quality of life of everyone now living, and will have major repercussions for future generations. Much can be achieved immediately with current technologies and knowledge given sufficient will and investment. But coping with future challenges will require more radical changes to the food system and investment in research to provide new solutions to novel problems.The analysis of the Project has demonstrated the need for policy-makers to take a much broader perspective than hitherto when making the choices before them – they need to consider the global food system from production to plate.The food system is not a single designed entity, but rather a partially self-organised collection of interacting parts. For example, the food systems of different countries are now linked at all levels, from trade in raw materials through to processed products. Besides on-farm production, capture fisheries and aquaculture are also important, in terms of both nutrition and providing livelihoods, especially for the poor – about a billion people rely on fish as their main source of animal protein. Many vulnerable communities obtain a significant amount of food from the wild (‘wild foods’), which increases resilience to food shocks. Policy-makers also need to recognise food as a unique class of commodity and adopt a broad view of food that goes far beyond narrow perspectives of nutrition, economics and food security.Food is essential for survival and for mental and physical development – nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy and in early growth (especially the first two years) can have lifelong effects. For the very poor, obtaining a minimum amount of calories becomes a dominant survival activity.However, issues of culture, status and religion also strongly affect both food production and demand, and hence shape the basic economics of the food system.

Full Vision: How do you describe your Vision for a regenerative and nourishing food future for your Place and People for 2050?

Agriculture needs a revolution to be able to feed 9 billion people by 2050 within planetary boundaries. Urban agriculture (UA) is heralded as a solution, but can it deliver? To answer this question, different types of UA need to be discussed with their distinct advantages and limitations, particularly differentiating conventional open-air extensive farming from high-yielding Controlled Environment Farming (CEF). The former is too low yielding to support food production in a meaningful way but can enhance community, provide education services, psychological value and improve local environmental conditions – particularly if applied on urban rooftops. This kind of farming is rarely commercially viable but offers significant societal value. Business models could range from being offered as public services to being cross-subsidized through attached commercial operations. Distinct from this, some forms of CEF may provide substantial contributions to food outputs in years to come, as CEF can be expected to grow significantly, driven by inherent efficiency advantages over current food value chains. However, it tends to be highly capital- and knowledge-intensive and will likely develop at the fringes of cities due to economic considerations. As such, it is a form of peri-urban agriculture (PUA) and could become part of a peri-urban circular economy for food.

How did you hear about the Food System Vision Prize?

  • Email

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Thank you so much for the Food Extension Initiative.

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