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Oil Dangers With Martins

Building the future generations and addressing the Nigerian (Niger Delta) biggest environmental and food system challenges.

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Lead Applicant Organization Name

Oil Dangers With Martins

Lead Applicant Organization Type

  • Small company (under 50 employees)

Website of Legally Registered Entity

oildangerswithmartins www.facebook.com/oildangerswithmartins www.twitter.com/@OilDangers www.instagram.com/@oildangerswithmartins

How long have you / your team been working on this Vision?

  • 1-3 years

Lead Applicant: In what city or town are you located?

Port Harcourt

Lead Applicant: In what country are you located?

Nigeria

Your Selected Place: what’s the name of the Place you’re developing a Vision for?

Niger Delta covers 27,000 km^2, but we major on the Nigeria oil state headquarters Rivers State, covering 11,077 km² to other places

What country is your selected Place located in?

Nigeria

Describe your relationship to the place you’ve selected.

I select this place because crops, farmlands and creeks have suffered low yield and excessive oil pollution as thoughtless indiscretion that endamaged the food system and environment.

Niger Delta nevertheless is endowed with resources outside crude oil with very good soil for agricultural produce of both food and cash crops even to export market to diversify the country’s economy. Agriculture has been their unbreakable source and link to the Niger Delta heritage until the discovery of oil in 1950s that spell her doom.

Today, ‘the most recent estimates show that Nigeria is responsible for 490 metric tonnes of GHG emissions (CO2 equivalent) annually, just over 1 percent of the global production’, (see https://www.republic.com.ng/junejuly-2018/nigeria-climate-change/ ) and as much the major contributor to Climate Change in Africa and all coming from one source which is the “Niger Delta” region of which agriculture has been most vulnerable to this great ordeal.

Niger Delta with population of over 30,000000(thirty million) people and still increasing, if neglected within this circle of food system vision and environmental protection to enhance food security by global target and beyond will be tending to pandemic as Nigerians minority group.

The wide spread and incessant third party interference (oil sabotage and theft/illegal local refining)  within the region, (see, https://www.shell.com.ng/media/nigeria-reports-and-publications-briefing-notes/security-theft-and-sabotage.html ) which has contributed to about 80 percent of oil spillage within the regional oil and gas host communities (Niger Delta), has caused alarming food system and environmental challenges. However, I schooled, and have traveled around this region as an indigene, and I can categorically tell you that most tribe within this region is caught up on same struggle.  

Describe the People and Place: Provide information that would be helpful for an outsider who has never been there and may have no context about this Place to better understand the area.

Niger Delta region of Nigeria is the land area in the country's oil producing states, located in the South-South geographical boundaries of the country with about 7.5% of Nigeria land mass with diversity of languages and home to over 30 million people. The Niger Delta is a vast low-lying region through which the waters of the Niger River drain into the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristic landforms in this region include oxbow lakes, river meander belts (see meander), and prominent levees.

 Niger Delta is known for diverse tribes and different culture peculiar to these tribes with their rich agricultural festivals, ranging from fishing festival, yam festival and more with insatiable appetite for food as rich agricultural produce region which include Yam, Rice, Beans, Plantain, Banana, Cassava, Sweet-potato, Maize, Palm fruit, cocoyam, vegetables, fruits etc, as they consume their locally produced foods and farming in a sustainable way till this great ordeal of oil in the land.

Niger Delta region contributes about 80% of the Nigerian economy through the oil and gas exploration and production in their land and shipping of the crude through same region to refine, but gaining very little or no benefits from the government and the E&P companies and most especially continuous marginalization and negligence from the oil and gas exploration companies which led to increase and incessant third part interference within the region.

Oil spillage as a result of wide spread of sabotage and theft/illegal local refining and somewhat equipment failures has hence caused excessive pollution within the region, damaging the food system and activities: (farmlands, creeks, fish ponds, etc) which has affected agricultural produce as their long aged tradition, inflicting of food pricing within the region; consequently posing as major treat to future food security and sustainability.

The black gold in this region has caused betrayal and no hope for the common masses as their heritage is rapidly taken-over by excessive pollution.

What is the estimated population (current 2020) in your Place?

30000000

Challenges: Describe the current (2020) and the future (2050) challenges that your food system faces.

Over the years Nigeria has been known among the leading oil & gas producing countries in the World with highest level of oil sabotage and theft; leaving the environment with excessive pollution like carbon black soot, acid rain, oil spillages and more as a result of third party interference (oil sabotage and theft/illegal local refining) and gas flaring thereby damaging the growing bodies of the younger people and destroying the intermediate food systems within the region.

Over the last three decades, Niger Delta has suffered and currently suffering the rapid change of the entire ecosystem from the chemical components and toxic elements from these oil spillages. Consequently, animals, and aquatic lives are dying off; children and women has faced chronic health challenges and consequently death, drinking, cooking, bathing, and eating fishes caught from their oil polluted lakes of which spilled oil can reach groundwater bodies, in which case it will form a sheen on top of groundwater and will move at lower speed, and most communities within the region till date are fully dependent on their natural lakes.

Oil spillage and gas flaring has led to agricultural low yield produce, reducing the household food security. Oil spillages has also continuously kept reducing Vitamin C in vegetables to about 36% and the crude protein content of cassava by 40% which result in a 24% increase in the prevalence of childhood malnutrition currently suffered by one in seven of children in the grass-root level within this region. Oil spillages and as a result of sabotage and theft has also caused untold hardship and hunger with no hope even for the future to these local farmers. It has been identified as the biggest threat to the Nigeria’s economy and budget as the country’s GDP majors on crude oil market (see https://www.ft.com/content/2bff3f8a-bb15-11e3-948c-00144feabdc0 ).
The connections between food and oil is systemic and the price of both could be affect the in the commercial market as the food system is fuel and highly dependent on transportation. Farm machineries of which greater percent are diesel fuel engine also are dependent on oil to operate. Illegal local refining has hence reduced the life span of these machineries as the illegal local refined products which is half way and improperly refined is made more available at the market and on high demand for its cheap and more affordable but more disastrous to the food system within the region.    
 This has also caused political unrest in the region as investors and the policy makers laid blame for sector under performance on pipeline sabotage and theft. Policy makers that are placed with more objective measures to minimize the environmental impact has however not exactly translated good might on the effects on environment. Furthermore, if these challenges are not collectively tackled, the intermediate food system in Niger Delta will suffer pandemic.

Address the Challenges: Describe how your Vision will address the challenges described in the previous question.

Oil Dangers With Martins as evolutionary environmental campaign organization duplicate efforts to protect and conserve the environment from further pollution using our regular flag modules #SaveOurFutureToday flag programme in schooling the society (Community-to-Community, School-to-School, Creek-to-Creek) the effects of oil sabotage and theft/illegal local refining impact on Communities (Environment), Agriculture, Diets, Economy & Budgets.  

Reaching out the Niger Delta communities and public schools with community town-hall environmental awareness/vision for intermediate food system lectures and campaign, and class-room slide show environmental awareness lectures and campaign; collaborating with wide array of national and international Organizations, government departments & regulatory bodies, corporate bodies, NGOs and especially the oil and gas companies agricultural flagships initiatives within the region to foster our vision for inclusiveness and systemic for the intermediate food system, teaching the local farmers approaches to different agroecological and socio economic conditions, giving out seeds and stems to the local farmers through our partners and ensuring solutions on light and very affordable machineries and tools to step up our priority on food security and encourage them.  

Integrating from Rivers State (with total land mass of 11,077 km2) the Niger Delta oil and gas state headquarters to other Niger Delta States using our undergraduate volunteer community and the Faculty Deans in Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Environmental Sciences/Technology from different tertiary institutions within the region to achieve our priority in our statement ‘BY 2050 AND BEYOND WE WILL STILL EAT FOOD AND NOT DRINK OIL’.  

Our vision for more inclusiveness and systemic for the intermediate food system within the Niger Delta region has add-on to the regulatory framework for the global four key aspiration for future-proof food systems which encompasses sustainability, minimizing negative environmental impacts, including smallholder farmers, women and youth, etc. We aim and have initialized to collaborate with the Green River Project which is NAOC’s flagship agricultural initiative and lots of other organizations to improve the livelihoods of the oil states communities. Knowing that the local smallholder farmers within the region majors on Yam, Rice, Beans, Plantain, Banana, Cassava, Sweet-potato, Maize, Palm fruit, cocoyam, vegetables, and other fruits farming; we collaborate with agricultural initiatives and other organizations to increase food productivity by donating stems, seeds and veterinary medicine to the local smallholder farmers and pursue food security, stressing the need for expansion in our campaign to increasing food availability within the region.

High Level Vision: With these challenges addressed, now provide a high level description of how the Place and the lives of its People will be different than they are now.

Life will be made lot more easier for the people and the country at large as the region controls most of the country's entire food systems especially in transportation because despite the declining or stable prices for most staple foods across the region and the country, atypical staple food prices are mainly attributable to the persisting and negative macro-economic situation in the country as a result of sabotage and theft/illegal local refining; and these trends are mostly driven by reduced oil revenue and reduced international crude oil prices, as well as oil spillage in Niger Delta, and have led to declining government revenue, foreign reserves, and cash liquidity in the economy. Consequently, the Naira continues to lose value against major foreign currencies.

Therefore, mitigating oil spillage as a result of third-party interference against agriculture in the region; food pricing will be normal affordable, untold hardship and poverty  will be leveraged as the local farmers would increase in their food production, the rate of child malnutrition within the regional grassroots will reduce and the commercial farm machineries’ life span would last longer or perhaps as the manufacturer’s expiration date.

Since the launch of the ‘#SaveOurFutureToday’ flag program in Nigeria and having imparted our society with the SDGs and 2050 food security views, knowing that by 2050 we will eat food and not drinking oil, we have numerous local smallholder farmers, youths, children, companies, and schools harmonize with the flag program and pledge to join force in building a healthy environment to improve Nigerian food systems. We therefore hope to see improvement in all sections of Niger Delta food systems with continuity.

Full Vision: How do you describe your Vision for a regenerative and nourishing food future for your Place and People for 2050?

Our vision for more inclusiveness and systemic for the intermediate food system within the Niger Delta region has add-on to the regulatory framework for the global four key aspiration for future-proof food systems which encompasses sustainability, minimizing negative environmental impacts, including smallholder farmers, women and youth, etc. We aim and have initialized collaboration with the Green River Project which is NAOC’s flagship agricultural initiative and lots of other organizations to improve the livelihoods of the oil states communities. First, for sensitization on the effect of oil spillage to the environment, agriculture and economy with our #SaveOurFutureToday flag program Community-to-Community, School-to-School and Creeks-to-Creeks, (hoping to impart them with same vision that ‘we will eat food in the future and not drink oil’). Knowing that the local smallholder farmers within the region majors in Yam, Rice, Beans, Plantain, Banana, Cassava, Sweet-potato, Maize, Palm fruit, cocoyam, vegetables, and other fruits farming; we collaborate with agricultural initiatives and other organizations to increase food productivity by donating stems, seeds and veterinary medicine to the local smallholder farmers and pursue food security, stressing the need for expansion in our campaign to increasing food availability within the region. Promoting and supporting change of perspective on bush burning before planting which has been invoke over the years for the smallholder farmers within the region and as environmental protection for sustainability advocate, the impact of oil spillage hence creating a sustainable food future. To change the local farming practices within the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, we are putting in place what we call the three i-drive which is ensuring:  

•    1. Immediate benefits: knowing that sustainability and resilience is constant, changing their perspectives on long term on the type of practice and increase in production; we are consolidating on 10(ten) years partnership agreement with the flagship of NAOC which is the Green River Project and the flagship of SPDC which is the Shell Livewire Program, together with our trained staffs and our undergraduate volunteers from facilities of environmental sciences and agriculture from different tertiary institutions within the region, who will teach the local farmers approaches to different agroecological and socio economic conditions and also meet up their needs on this category in our Community-to-Community #SaveOurFutureToday flag program.  

•    2. Intermediate and applicable tools: ensuring solutions on light and very affordable machineries and tools to step up our priority on food security and encourage them.

•    3. Investigative study: skill acquisition and training the local farmers on new innovative ways, knowing their challenges in food production.

How did you hear about the Food System Vision Prize?

  • Website

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To change the local farming practices within the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, we are putting in place what we call the three i-drive which is ensuring:
1. Immediate benefits: knowing that sustainability and resilience is constant, changing their perspectives on long term on the type of practice and increase in production, we are half way in partnership with the flagship of NAOC which is the Green River Project and the flagship of SPDC which is the Shell Livewire Program who will teach the local farmers approaches to different agroecological and socio economic conditions and also meet up their needs on this category in our Community-to-Community #SaveOurFutureToday flag program.
2. Intermediate and applicable tools: ensuring solutions on light and very affordable machineries and tools to step up our priority on food security and encourage them.
3. Investigative study: skill acquisition and training the local farmers on new innovative ways, knowing their challenges in food production.

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