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Mr. Daudi Bitature

Musana's vision is being able to empower street food vendors with solar-powered carts with some financial literacy training

Photo of Daui Bitature
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Lead Applicant Organization Name

Musana Carts LTD

Lead Applicant Organization Type

  • Small company (under 50 employees)

If part of a multi-stakeholder entity (i.e. team), provide the names of other organizations and types of stakeholders collaborating with you.

Coca-Cola: Help with the provision of fridges & with cart branding. Total: Provide eco-stoves used by Musana street food vendors. Bodawerk: Supply solar systems & help with maintenance.

Website of Legally Registered Entity

http://musanacarts.com/

How long have you / your team been working on this Vision?

  • 3-10 years

Lead Applicant: In what city or town are you located?

Kampala.

Lead Applicant: In what country are you located?

Uganda

Your Selected Place: what’s the name of the Place you’re developing a Vision for?

Africa, because it has over 150 million street food vendors that are mostly using non-renewable energy sources & lack financial skills.

What country is your selected Place located in?

Uganda

Describe your relationship to the place you’ve selected.

Uganda is where I was born and In 2015 The Virgin Group published a study declaring Uganda as the most
entrepreneurial country in the world, yet 95% of our population lives on less than $5 a
day. We need to double this income to pull ourselves and our comrades out of poverty.
Uganda also has one of the fastest-growing populations in the world, meeting the food
demand is a real challenge for our generation. In the crowded urban space of Kampala,
many people get their meals from street vendors.

Also, Musana Carts deliver a pathway to formalized business through partnerships with the local city council. Vendors previously worked in legal limbo are uncertain whether their daily inventory would be confiscated by local authorities. With legally recognized Musana Carts they are freed from this uncertainty and enter the formal economy.


Describe the People and Place: Provide information that would be helpful for an outsider who has never been there and may have no context about this Place to better understand the area.

UGANDA is a land locked country in the east of Africa located between the Democratic Republic of Congo & Kenya. Being located along the equator Uganda has substantial natural resources, including fertile soils, regular rainfall & abundant sunlight all year round making agriculture one of the most important sectors employing 72% of the workforce. The agricultural sector is fragmented and dominated by small farmers most of whom combine subsistence farming with cash crop and livestock farming. Most farmers own land individually except in parts of Northern Uganda where pastoralists land is owned communally. Farming is gradually becoming mechanised although the bulk of cultivation is still done by hand or cattle driven ox ploughs. Large / Commercial-scale farming of cash crops is found in parts of the Central, South and South Western parts of Uganda. There are commercial plantations of tea, palms, rice, and sugarcane. Coffee and banana plantations tend to be small although, in some parts of the South West, there are some commercial-scale banana plantations that supply produce to Kampala and other urban centres.

Uganda is a home to many tribes that speak different languages. Uganda has 56 tribes and about nine indigenous communities that formally came to be recognized in the 1995 constitution amendment of 2005. English is the official language of Uganda. Luganda and Swahili also widely spoken in most parts of the country. With the increasing Asian population, most Asian languages are spoken, there is also French, Arabic and Germany mainly in institutions where they are taught and at embassies.

Food and drink is a key sector in Uganda’s economy with agriculture accounting for 21% of the GDP, responsible for about 46% of total export earnings and employing over 72% of the population. Ugandan cuisine consists of traditional and modern cooking styles, practices, foods and dishes in Uganda with English, Arab, and Asian cuisine (especially Indian cuisine) influences. Like the cuisines of most countries, it varies in complexity, from the most basic, a starchy filler with a sauce of beans or meat, to several-course meals served in upper-class homes and high-end restaurants. Most tribes in Uganda have their own speciality dish or delicacy. There are various cuisines in the Cuisine of Uganda. Most of them being extremely traditional, however some out influenced due to its history of invasions. Nevertheless, you are most likely to find yummy banana dishes, stews, pastes and juicy fruits and drinks in the Ugandan Cuisine. One of Uganda’s most popular street food options has to be “the rolex” that is a play of words on “rolled eggs” made with eggs & vegetables wrapped in a chapatti. Rolex vendors are found all of the country at almost all trading centres attempting to meet the insatiable demand for this cheap & quickly made snack.

What is the estimated population (current 2020) in your Place?

44000000

Challenges: Describe the current (2020) and the future (2050) challenges that your food system faces.

Musana carts being a social entrepreneurship company at its core is aiming to provide franchisees/vendors with an affordable hygienic work station & financial literacy skills whilst catering to final consumers with safely prepared, cheap & tasty street food.

However, most food vendors in Uganda currently use charcoal stoves to prepare their various delicacies that is way more hazardous to the environment.

Uganda has 50% of the population below 18yrs of age, meaning that there will not be enough job opportunities for the youth thus driving them into entrepreneurship but given that 95% of our population lives on under $5 a day means that most of these youth cant find the capital required to start up their own entities.

Kampala's street vendors work in what is known as an informal economy because they are not officially registered and do not pay taxes. They are essentially illegal businesses.  Approximately 2/3 of the workers in the world are employed in the informal sector, which represents a market of $10 trillion dollars worldwide.

In this sector, where the government usually sees chaos and uncertainty, we see opportunity and entrepreneurial spirit. We believe in creating legitimate employment in these economies, and in so doing creating a more egalitarian world. Because it is in the informal economy where most individuals are currently able to earn money, to live and to prosper, it is our mission to help co-create that more egalitarian future with them.

Address the Challenges: Describe how your Vision will address the challenges described in the previous question.

Job Creation

Each Musana Cart employs between 3 and 6 vendors. Musana Carts Ltd is based in Uganda, employing, maintenance technicians, field agents, designers, engineers and managers in Kampala.

Eco Cooking

Every year charcoal smoke inhalation causes over 2 million deaths worldwide. Musana Carts are equipped with an eco stove, reducing smoke emissions and fire hazard for the safety of the vendors and the residents of Kampala, further improving health and well being for themselves and their community.

Food Safety

In order to acquire a formal business license, each vendor will be medically cleared and trained to handle food, as well as pass a food safety inspection. Residents of Kampala will for the first time enjoy clean, affordable, food, which is made safely, free of carbon emissions.

Income

Musana Carts allows Kampala vendors to reduce energy costs and to work at night, creating additional working time to sell more products and increase revenues. The street vendors in Kampala will now be able to invest in the livelihoods of their families (e.g. pay school fees more consistently), treat common illnesses more often and save money for emergencies for the first time.

Solar Energy

Musana Carts provide solar energy, allowing vendors to save on charcoal expenses in a safer and more hygienic way. This also offers the capability for a fridge and other electronic resources at an affordable price.

Legality

Musana Carts deliver a pathway to formalized business through partnerships with the local city council. Vendors previously worked in legal limbo, uncertain whether their daily inventory would be confiscated by local authorities. With legally recognized Musana Carts they are freed from this uncertainty and enter the formal economy.

Full Vision: How do you describe your Vision for a regenerative and nourishing food future for your Place and People for 2050?

Having been born and raised by a more than fortunate family (by Ugandan standards) within Uganda I have been lucky enough to taste and experiences almost all cultural staple foods & customs. And what I have come to notice is that Uganda as a whole being a country based on the equator with abundant rainfall & sunshine is mostly dominated by the commercial and subsistence farming of starchy foods such us matooke (bananas), sweet potatoes, millet , cassva, rice & yams.

   The medium-sized green bananas are locally known as "matooke". They are peeled, wrapped in the plant's leaves and set in a cooking pot (sufuria) on the stalks which have been removed from the leaves. The pot is then placed on a charcoal fire and the matoke is steamed for a couple of hours in water placed in the bottom of the cooking pot.
While uncooked, the matoke is white and fairly hard. Cooking turns it soft and yellow. The matoke is then mashed while still wrapped in the leaves and often served on a fresh leaf. It is then eaten with a sauce made of vegetables, groundnut sauce or some type of meat (goat and beef are common).

In southern Uganda and especially in Buganda (Kampala, Masaka ...) the cusine consists of Matooke and 'luwombo' = to delicious stew (chicken, beef or Groundnuts) steamed in banana leaves.
Uganda is predominantely agriciltural country and the food is good
Besides matooke, the cuisine of Uganda consists of traditional cooking with English, Arab and Asian (especially Indian) influences. Like the cuisines of most countries, it varies in complexity, from the most basic popular dish to the refined and more complexe several-course meals served in upper-class homes and high-end restaurants.

Cassava, yam and African sweet potato are also eaten, the more affluent include white or "Irish" potato and rice in their diets. Soybean was promoted as a healthy food staple in the 1970s and this is also used, especially for breakfast. Chapati, an Asian flatbread, is also part of Ugandan cuisine. Amaranth (dodo), nakati, and borr are examples of regional greens.
Chicken, fish (usually fresh, but there is also a dried variety, reconstituted for stewing), beef, goat and mutton are all commonly eaten, although among the rural poor there would have to be a good reason for slaughtering a large animal such as a goat or a cow and nyama, (Swahili word for "meat") would not be eaten every day.
Fruits like oranges, papayas, lemons, pineapples….are plentiful and regularly eaten, as in the Western World, as snacks or dessert. Europeans introduced cake and this is also popular.

Most of these foods are prepared using a locally made charcoal stove usually known as a “sigiri” that is cheap to acquire and even cheaper to use given it burns charcoal. But Every year charcoal smoke inhalation causes over 2 million deaths worldwide and Musana Carts are equipped with an eco stove, reducing smoke emissions and fire hazard for the safety of the vendors and the residents of Kampala, further improving health and well being for themselves and their community.

Despite all the staple foods mentioned above, Uganda’s favourite snack has to be the “ROLEX”. Chapatis, eggs and vegetables are the three humble ingredients needed to make Uganda's ubiquitous snack food, the Rolex. A play of words on 'rolled eggs, with no relation to the watch brand. Musana carts were built to aid the preparation of this Ugandan delicacy by vendors all around the country with the aim of increasing overall output whilst reducing the carbon footprint left by vendors on a day to day  basis. Musana Carts provide solar energy, allowing vendors to save on charcoal expenses in a safer and more hygienic way. This also offers capability for a fridge and other electronic resources at an affordable price.

There are over 500,00 vendors in kampala city alone that are all classified to be within the informal economy. Musana Carts deliver a pathway to formalized business through partnerships with the local city council. Vendors previously worked in legal limbo, uncertain whether their daily inventory would be confiscated by local authorities are now legally recognized Musana Cart vendors.

In order to acquire a formal business license, each vendor will be medically cleared and trained to handle food, as well as pass a food safety inspection. Residents of Kampala will for the first time enjoy clean, affordable, food, which is made safely, free of carbon emissions.

Each Musana Cart employs between 3 and 6 vendors whilst Musana Carts Ltd employs maintenance technicians, field agents, designers, engineers and managers within Kampala aimed at boosting job creation for our very young population.

How did you hear about the Food System Vision Prize?

  • Email

3 comments

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Comment
Spam
Photo of Archiebold Manasseh
Team

Cool project! All the best

Spam
Photo of muhammad alhaji kaka
Team

Hello nice to see you here

Spam
Photo of Lauren Ito
Team

Hi Daui Bitature great to see you joining the Prize!

We noticed your submission is currently unpublished. Was this your intention? We'd love to have your submission included in the Prize. Even if you've not started populating your Vision just yet, by publishing your submission you can make it public for other teams in your region to see, get in touch and possibly even collaborate with you.

You can publish it by hitting the "Publish" button at the top of your post. You can also update your Vision at any time before 31 January 2020 by clicking on the "Edit Contribution" on top. If you need inspiration or guidance, take a look at the Food Vision Prize Toolkit. linked here: http://bit.ly/2X4ZxQk

Look forward to seeing your Vision evolve.