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Aleboe Farms

Deliver wholesome, tasty organic food for all

Photo of Aleboe Wollie-Wollimoh
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Written by

Lead Applicant Organization Name

Stimuluz Corporation

Lead Applicant Organization Type

  • Farmer Co-op or Farmer Business Organization

Website of Legally Registered Entity

www.stimuluz.org

How long have you / your team been working on this Vision?

  • 1-3 years

Lead Applicant: In what city or town are you located?

ACCRA

Lead Applicant: In what country are you located?

Ghana

Your Selected Place: what’s the name of the Place you’re developing a Vision for?

Ghana, a country of 238,535 km²

What country is your selected Place located in?

Ghana

Describe your relationship to the place you’ve selected.

I was born and bred in Ghana and having lived most part of my adult life. I love the culture- the food, the music, the dance, the costume. Everthynf dress has a code and evry code is a fashiob expression. Ir could be to celebrate a triumph, mourn the dead, or name a child.; each piece of cloth design has a name, with deep-rooted meaning that gives legitimacy to wear it to an event or Occassion. Costume for Roylaty, the marvelous Kente for the south or Agbadza ,in the North. Food is spicy and divers. Although the staple may be the same, recipies may differ from one tribe to the other; although in recent times, the tastes buds have transcended tribal barries. There is a way to enjoy Ghana; Look up, look down look around and take it all in. Our Vision is to provide enough poultry to bridge the poultry meet gap of Ghana.

Describe the People and Place: Provide information that would be helpful for an outsider who has never been there and may have no context about this Place to better understand the area.

The Culture- the music & Dance; the diversity of dilects and food. The genuine hospitality and warmth to strangers...Ghana ia Africa's Hometown.

What is the estimated population (current 2020) in your Place?

30

Challenges: Describe the current (2020) and the future (2050) challenges that your food system faces.

The Global Agricultural Information postulates that Ghana's 2017 broiler meat production reached 35,000 tons, supplying less than 25 percent of demand. Imports were expected to increase by 14,000 tons to 158,000 tons due to insufficient domestic supply and rising demand in the same period. U.S. poultry meat exports to Ghana hold over 35 percent market share. Competition from Brazil and the European Union has been increasing; however, U.S. poultryenjoys brand loyalty advantage over its competitors. By 2018 Ghana is said to Import. over $383 million; translating worth of chicken annually; the gap of poultry production very huge. The lack of sustainable support for commercial farming from Farming to logistics and Market, has contributed to a larg extent to the low level of production.

Address the Challenges: Describe how your Vision will address the challenges described in the previous question.

P.O BOX CT7615 CANTONMENTS

High Level Vision: With these challenges addressed, now provide a high level description of how the Place and the lives of its People will be different than they are now.

Our Vision is to see A Prosperous People In A Prosperous World. Our Mission to Make a wealthy, healthy and happy people in a wealthy, safe and clean world through Advocacy, Personal and viable[scalable & sustainable] business Development initiatives in an environment of fairness, nurturing and fulfilment; creating new frontiers and living a legacy for generations unborn… The Aleboe Farm program is to provide wholesome,organic food for all. The project seeks to create a viable,scalable and sustainable poultry production system that targets 10,000.00 susbistent farmers with over 70% women in this area; who can each produce at least a 1,200 at 3 bathes per year of broilers birds ; making some 36000 birds per annum. These farmers will be provided with Movable semi-intensive,semi Battery cage system that can take 300 birds at a time. Farmers with larer space can opt for up to 4 of these poultry units; making 1200 birds. Each farmer will be supplied with bird stock day olds Broilers; Feed for the period; vitatmins and medications; farm extention services and market demand for the birds. A system is made available to convert poltry dropings into organic compost manure;bagged and sold for extra revenue. A mobile Poultry processing van will help farmers process their birds with the highest standards of care and hygiene- HACCP. A central purchase point for the birds will be made and birds bout at fair price and re-supplied to households, iinstitutions, special sales point with security agencies and wholesares etc. The pilot project will see the structure materialise, processing Van,compst making machine and day olds \, feed and medication for the first 2 yrs. This will further be scaled up as described above. Culturally, susbistence farming is part of us. Making a way to do the same more efficiently is the pur[ise of this program. This has a huge potential to transform poultry production, provid wholesome protein, create jobs and support Government/WFO policy.

Full Vision: How do you describe your Vision for a regenerative and nourishing food future for your Place and People for 2050?

Ghana, country of western Africa, situated on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea. Although relatively small in area and population, Ghana is one of the leading countries of Africa, partly because of its considerable natural wealth and partly because it was the first black African country south of the Sahara to achieve independence from colonial rule.Situated on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea in western Africa, Ghana is bordered to the northwest and north by Burkina Faso, to the east by Togo, to the south by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the west by Côte d’Ivoire. Soils Throughout the country, weathering, leaching, and the formation of laterite hardpans (hard, impervious layers composed chiefly of iron and aluminum oxides cemented by relatively insoluble materials) by capillary movement (the movement of water containing mineral salts to the surface) and evaporation are common processes that vary in importance according to the characteristics of each locality. Leaching is more pronounced in the wet south, while the formation of laterite is more widespread in the drier north. In general, most soils are formed in place from parent rock material that has been subjected to prolonged erosion and consequently has limited fertility. In the forest zone the soils are mostly lateritic. They are subdivided into relatively fertile and less-acidic ochrosols (red, brown, and yellow-brown, relatively well-drained soils) in areas of moderate precipitation and into more-acidic and less-fertile oxisols in the extreme southwest, where annual precipitation exceeds 65 inches (1,650 mm). Ochrosols occur over considerable areas in the coastal and northern savanna zones. As in the forest zone, they are the best soils for agriculture. The coastal savanna zone has an abundance of soil types, including tropical black earths, tropical gray earths, acid vleisols, and sodium vleisols. Except for the tropical black earths, known locally as Akuse clays, most of these soils are of little importance agriculturally. The Akuse clays fill a broad zone across the coastal savanna plains; although heavy and intractable, they respond well to cropping under irrigation and mechanical cultivation. Because of their intrinsic poverty in nutrients, most of the soils are heavily dependent upon the humus supplied by the vegetation cover. There is thus a delicate balance between vegetation and soil fertility, which may be upset by uncontrolled burning or overuse. Climate Ghana’s climate, like that of the rest of the Guinea Coast, is determined largely by the interplay of two air masses: a hot, dry continental air mass that forms over the Sahara and a warm, humid maritime tropical air mass that forms over the South Atlantic. Both air masses move toward the Equator with their hemispheric winds and meet at the Guinea Coast for several months each year. Continental air moves southward with the northeast trade winds, known in western Africa as the harmattan, and maritime tropical air moves northward with the southwest trades. The zone where these air masses converge is characterized by seasonal line squall precipitation. The convergence zone itself oscillates north and south, following the seasonal movements of the overhead sun and the thermal equator; it reaches its most northerly position in the central Sahara, about latitude 21° N, in August, and its most southerly position about 7° N, a few miles north of the Ghana coastline, in January. Rains occur when the dominant air mass is maritime tropical, and drought prevails when continental air and the harmattan dominate. In the savanna country north of the Kwahu Plateau, there are two seasons—a dry season from November to March, with hot days and cool nights under clear skies, and a wet season that reaches its peak in August and September. The mean annual precipitation is between 40 and 55 inches (1,020 and 1,400 mm), but there is a marked moisture deficit because of the long, intensely dry season that follows. In the southern forest country, where the annual mean precipitation from north to south has a range of about 50 to 86 inches (1,270 to 2,180 mm), there are two rainy seasons—one from April to July and a lesser one from September to November—and two relatively dry periods that occur during the harmattan season, from December to February, and in August, which is a cool, misty month along the coast. In the Accra Plains, anomalously low annual mean precipitation figures vary from 40 inches (1,000 mm) to less than 30 inches (760 mm), and the precipitation variability and the vegetation bear close resemblance to conditions in the northern savanna zone. Temperatures show much more regional uniformity. The annual mean temperature is from 78 to 84 °F (26 to 29 °C) and the daily range only some 10 to 15 °F (6 to 8 °C) along the coast and some 13 to 30 °F (7 to 17 °C) in the north. Average relative humidities range from nearly 100 percent in the south to 65 percent in the north, although, during the harmattan season, figures as low as 12 percent have been recorded in the north and around Accra. Enervating conditions produced locally by the combination of high temperatures and high humidities are moderated by altitude in the higher parts and by land and sea breezes along the coast. In general, the hottest months are February and March, just before the rains, and the lowest temperatures occur in January or—along the coast—in August. Plant and animal life Although soils and biotic factors (i.e., those pertaining to living organisms, including humans) are important, vegetation is primarily determined by precipitation. There are three principal types of vegetation from south to north occurring in the coastal savanna, in the forest zone, and in the northern savanna zone. The coastal savanna in the southeastern plains around Accra consists of a mixture of scrub and tall grass (mostly Guinea grass), with giant anthills, often 10 to 14 feet (3 to 4 metres) high, providing an anchorage for thicket clumps that often include Elaeophorbia (a fleshy-leaved plant containing caustic latex) and other drought- and fire-resistant species such as the baobab (Adansonia digitata). In the forest zone (the southern third of the country and the area along the Akwapim-Togo Ranges, where the mean annual precipitation exceeds 45 inches [1,140 mm] and is well distributed throughout the year without a pronounced dry season), the predominant vegetation is evergreen and tropical semi-deciduous forest. There are tall trees of varying heights, forming a closed canopy at the top, above which tower a few forest giants, such as the silk cotton tree, the wawa tree (African whitewood, a hardwood), and the African mahogany. The evergreen forest is in the extreme southwest, where the precipitation exceeds 65 inches (1,650 mm) a year, while there is a semi-deciduous forest farther north.The dense forest zone formerly covered an area of about 30,000 square miles (78,000 square km), but farming activities and timber exploitation have reduced it to less than 8,000 square miles (21,000 square km), including about 6,000 square miles (15,500 square km) of reserved forest. To ensure the sustainable use of the country’s rapidly diminishing forest resources, the government has embarked on a forestry policy involving the compulsory reforestation of cutover areas and more-accurate measurements of exploitable timber and rates of extraction and regeneration, as well as a ban on the export of round logs. The third vegetation type, the northern savanna, is found in the northern two-thirds of the country, where the low annual precipitation, between 30 and 45 inches (760 and 1,140 mm), occurs in a single season and is followed by a period of intense drought. There the vegetation consists mostly of tall Guinea grass, together with a scattering of low trees, such as the shea butter tree, various species of acacia, and baobabs. Along the northern border the savanna gives way to a more open type of grassland that has developed largely as a result of prolonged human interference. Ghana is relatively rich in animal life, although it has been reduced by hunting and the spread of human settlement. Large mammals include lions, leopards, hyenas, antelope, elephants, buffalo, wild hogs, chimpanzees, and many kinds of monkeys. Among the snakes are pythons, cobras, horned and puff adders, and green mambas. Crocodiles, the endangered manatees, and otters are found in the rivers and lagoons. Hippopotamuses are found in the Volta River. There are many species of lizards, tortoises, and giant snails. Among the numerous birds are parrots, hornbills, kingfishers, eagles, kites, herons, cuckoos, nightjars, sunbirds, egrets, vultures, snakebirds, and plantain eaters. woodland kingfisher woodland kingfisher Woodland kingfisher (Halcyon senegalensis) perched on a branch in Ghana. © Feathercollector/Dreamstime.com The ocean, rivers, and inland lakes are rich in fish and other forms of life. Sardines, locally called herring, arrive seasonally in the coastal waters in large shoals; other fish include anchovy, tuna, mackerel, soles, skates, mullet, bonitos, flying fish, lungfish, elephant fish, sea bream, and sharks. Edible turtles, barracuda, and stingrays are fairly common; mussels, crabs, lobsters, and prawns also are found. Insect life is particularly abundant. There are beetles, fireflies, ants, termites, butterflies, crickets, and bugs. Among the most dangerous insects are mosquitoes, tsetse flies, and blackflies (Simuliidae), which are responsible for transmitting the endemic diseases of malaria and yellow fever, trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), and onchocerciasis (river blindness, a parasitic disease), respectively. The Mole National Park near Damongo is about 1,900 square miles (4,900 square km) in extent and has an abundant game population including elephants, monkeys, and crocodiles. Kakum National Park, which is located 14 miles (22 km)...

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Photo of Kehinde Fashua
Team

Welcome Aleboe Wollie-Wollimoh  to the Prize community and thank you for your submission. To build a stronger vision for Accra, It will be great to see pictures, photos, videos and other visual materials depicting your chosen Place. Could you also explain how your Vision will address the 6 themes; Culture, diet, technology, economics, environment, Policy in your place?

The Prize tool kit on pages 9, 13 &14 details how your Visions will be evaluated.
https://tinyurl.com/wzbavw8

You can always update your Vision at any time before 31 January 2020. I look forward to seeing your Vision evolve through the coming days