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This Not So Retired Life UPDATE (1-22-17)

Welcome to This Not So Retired Life, a podcast that spotlights inspiring individuals and their non-traditional approach to "retired life."

Photo of Rachel Rosenbaum
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Who is your idea designed for and how does it support the dreams and obligations of those 50 and older?

To start, we are targeting the following three groups: 1. Individuals 50+ looking for a more fulfilling job. 2. Individuals late in their career who have hit a crisis (e.g. laid off, sick family members, divorce) 3. Millenials just starting to plan their careers and saving. These three groups will find value in the podcast for different reasons, however, they share a common need to shift their perception of what's possible. Our goal is to provide the spark of inspiration to kickstart that shift.

The Current Paradigm:

The belief that retirement is a predetermined age, around 60 or 65, when we stop working and start "living", was formed at a time when life expectancy was much lower. Now, we could live to be twice that age.  However, our cultural norms have not caught up. 

The Challenge: 

So the question becomes, does retirement have to be all or nothing? How might we inspire and empower these individuals to re-frame the way they approach retirement so they can live a long, fulfilling life,  in a financially-sustainable way?

For some, retiring at 60 is still desirable and feasible.  For others, this is not the case. Whether because they simply want to keep working, they're looking to try something new, or they need extra money to support multiple generations, there is a large population of individuals between 50-65 that are looking for an alternative to "traditional retirement." 

Our Solution:

This solution is intended to spark new thinking. It is not a financial solution...exactly. Rather, it is intended to be a catalyst for change. By sharing inspiring stories of real people in their late careers/early retirement who are discovering new careers, part time jobs, working in their communities, or starting businesses, we hope to make this new, more financially-sustainable model, more accessible...and maybe even desirable! 

How does it work?

For many reasons, these stories will be gathered and shared at a local level. First, we would like the stories to be culturally relevant. Second, we want to share tangible, relate-able stories that help inspire action. We'd like to highlight real models (as opposed to role models) that listeners have a higher likelihood of knowing and potentially even meeting with. However, the stories will likely be housed on a common platform, for those interested in stories from different communities.

We will leverage local journalists, entrepreneurs, credit-unions, and/or communities to find initial sponsors and interviewers.  Each interviewer will receive a toolkit which shows these sponsors how to find, conduct, edit, and post local interviews. Where we may suggest ideas for putting this idea into action, each community will develop its own approach to curating and sharing depending on its culture. 

Assumptions and design questions for prototyping:

  • A podcast is enough to move someone to action after years of thinking in a           different way
  • Interviewees and listeners would actually suggest other people to interview
  • People want to work more and find a new job their passionate about
  • A podcast is the “correct” form of media for reaching this population of people
  • What questions inspire people to act?
  • How might we reach a broad audience?


First podcast prototype: Sit Down and Think


Please listen and provide feedback on our first Podcast prototype! How do you feel after listening to the podcast? What are you left wondering? How could it be improved to reach a broader audience?


Insights and Implications gathered from prototypes

What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

I will start by interviewing people I know who have started second careers after 50 or are working part-time and share their stories on a blog. I would make sure to add a comments and "share" section to learn about how people are taking in and reacting to the information. I will also contact the local NPR station and morning shows to see if they'd be interested in running some of these stories.

What skills, input or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

What type of media does this population consume? what format is most digestible and approachable? How could you actually help plan, not just educate people on what's possible? How could we package and share the stories? What institutions could we collaborate with?

Tell us about your work experience:

I have worked with human-centered design as a way of approaching problem solving with kids, in non-profits, with cities and corporations.

Please check all that apply:

  • I'm not currently involved in a credit union, but am curious to learn more!

This idea emerged from

  • A Design Jam

How would you describe this idea while in an elevator with someone?

For the past few generations, we have operated by an unwritten law that retirement is a prescribed time in life when we stop working and start enjoying ourselves...if we have the funds to do so. By sharing examples of individuals 50+ who are reframing this construct with renewed purpose we can inspire current and future generations to do the same.

How might your idea be transferable to a large number of people?

Because the stories will be captured online, they are available for people around the world. We would like to start locally so that people in the community can relate to the stories shared. This process is then easily replicable by other communities who want to share the stories of their own residents. It can also be scaled nationally or internationally by creating a website or app where these stories are housed.

How do you plan to measure the impact of your idea?

-Number of listeners -Number of times its shared -Comments posted -Rate at which individuals are recommended to be interviewed -Follow up with survey: ask individuals to share stories of how they were impacted by this podcast

What are your immediate next steps after the challenge?

Finding a few initial interviews and a platform or organization that wants to share the first few stories, lend their editing/recording resources. Find sponsors or organization that would want to advertise their services that relate to the purpose of the podcasts.

18 comments

Join the conversation:

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Team

https://moroccotravelagency.net
https://moroccotravelagency.net/desert-tours-from-fes/

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Photo of Andrea Zelenak
Team

Hi Rachel!

I can easily picture this idea becoming real! The prototype is great! Seeing my aunts and uncles in retirement, approaching retirement or even skipping retirement, this is something I can easily see having an impact on their lives and decision making. For my aunt who had an extremely taxing job and is now retired, she has a brilliant mind and is bored from retirement and looking for somewhere to give her skills. I think this will be inspiring to all ages, showing it's not too late to follow or pursue a dream!

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Photo of Linda Dorman
Team

Hi Rachel,
I realize we're near the end of the challenge but I wanted to reach out and tell you that I think this is a great idea! As a 50+ digital nomad (no home base) who lives and works all over the world, I enjoy podcasts and videos that help me learn from others' experiences and keep me motivated. All too often, the content is geared towards a younger audience (millennials) or an older audience (retirees) however not much focuses on the life in-between, particularly age 50-65. Life on the road can get lonely so it's also a nice way to feel connected with a like-minded community and I try to devote 30-45 mins daily to listen and watch. Good luck with your idea and keep up the good work!
Linda Dorman

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Photo of Rachel Rosenbaum
Team

Thank you for sharing Linda Dorman !! Your story is inspiring and helpful in thinking about who this podcast will really impact. I'd love to hear more about your story if you're interested in sharing!

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Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Linda Dorman - thank you for commenting. Are there any financial topics or types of people you would like to hear on the podcast?

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Photo of Linda Dorman
Team

Since this challenge focuses on my peer group (age 50-65), I’d like to hear content geared around life stage events we experience during this time – career transition, pre-retirement, empty nesters, being single (or divorced/widowed), physical and emotional changes – and ways we can cope (or how others have done so). I realize this challenge is supposed to be about financial services but I think there are plenty of programs on TV, radio and online that speak to that topic – and too many of them focus on retirement planning and ignore the opportunity to help listeners live their best life in the years before retirement. I’d be more interested in programs on how to manage through these challenges and interviews with people who have done it, supported with downloadable guides on practical steps the listener can take to work through their own personal situation. One example of a weekly podcast I like is An Uncluttered Life https://www.anunclutteredlife.com/thepodcast/ though Warren & Betsy Talbot are no longer doing it (episodes are still available online).

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Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rachel,

It is great to see the example Podcast and User Journey.

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Welcome to the Refinement phase Rachel! We've added new Refinement questions to your original submission that we'd love for you to answer. Please check out the Refinement Phase Toolkit for instructions on how to answer the new questions and other recommendations we encourage all idea teams to consider in the upcoming weeks.

Refinement Phase Toolkit: http://ideo.pn/2du9sf7

Lastly, here's a useful tip: When you update the content of your post, it'd be helpful to indicate this in your idea title by adding an extension. For example, you can add the extension " - Update: Experience Maps 12/21" to you idea title. This will be a good way to keep people informed about how your idea is progressing!

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Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rachel!

I look forward to seeing how your idea develops in the refinement phase.

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Photo of Rachel Rosenbaum
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Excited to dive in!! Thanks for the support!

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Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Rachel!

There are a few stories in the research phase that might be a good starting point:

Career Reinvention: from a Corporate Job at ABC News to Working from Home as a Voice Over Artist - case study of a man in his 50s who was laid off then took acting classes and reinvented himself as a work from home voice over artist fulfilling his childhood dream.

Career Reinvention - examples of redefining yourself after 50 through choice and through circumstances and following your passions

Next Act! - changing careers in your fifties and the lack of financial support available

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Photo of Naman Mandhan
Team

Hi Rachel!

I love this idea! I was recently listening to a Hidden Brain podcast about how people struggle to make accurate predictions about their futures and how the role of reviews and insights from other people help them make those decisions, so I definitely see this being very useful for a lot of people!

How do you think the cultural/geographical backgrounds of your interviewees is going to factor into how these podcasts are broadcast? For example, some of Geert Hofstede's research on the effects of society and culture on behavior suggests that people in the US tend to be more individualistic and have more willingness to try out something new or different than someone who lives in India. From what I understand, this could mean that a 50-65 year old US citizen might be more willing to redefine his/her career at that age, whereas someone from India, despite living in the same location as the US citizen, might be more dependent on his/her society to affect change and/or may want to do more work within the community as opposed to for himself/herself.

I think the podcast could benefit from interviewees who come from a diverse set of geographical and cultural backgrounds to cater to a wider audience and provide different behavior perspectives to help a wider range of people relate to the content in the podcast.

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Photo of Rachel Rosenbaum
Team

Naman, thanks for your in depth response :) It definitely got my mind running. One of the reasons I wanted to localize this podcast, was to make sure that those interviewed were relate-able, and potentially even someone those listening would know. My parents and I were talking about how the people you know are really those who help define who you are and the actions you take, so if we want to change that, it has to come from someone we trust, rather than an unknown, far away role model. Your global perspective though, makes this localized approach even more important. I wonder how we could recruit a diverse group and build a flexible toolkit so that depending on the individual, community, or organization sponsoring the podcast, it would reach a wider variety of people, cultures, and perspectives.

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Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

There is a post in the research phase on 'Marketing to the 50+ consumer with authentic language' posted by Qyana Jené - https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/financial-longevity/research/marketing-to-the-50-consumer-with-authentic-language that might help with the development of your idea. 

I also found one article on podcasts for baby boomers - https://careerpivot.com/2016/baby-boomer-podcasts/

One on the best length for podcasting - http://davidjackson.org/2014/06/study-shows-best-length-podcasting/

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Photo of Rachel Rosenbaum
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Thank you for your help Kate!!! These are awesome suggestions!!

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Congrats on this being today's Featured Contribution!

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Photo of Kate Rushton
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Hi Rachel!

Thank you for sharing your idea! I really like the community element. I can’t wait to hear your first broadcast.

Could the financial planning institutions include credit unions? Could the credit unions also advertise the idea to its members?

What are the typical commute times in terms of time of day and duration in the US? Do people aged 50 - 65-years-old listen to the radio on their commute and what stations do they listen to?

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Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Rachel.  I love this idea!  You might find inspiration from, or maybe a partner with,  AARP  which has a radio show weekly, "with guests who fascinate and inform America 50+."  
Financial resiliency and work/jobs are some of the topics.  
http://www.aarp.org/tv-radio/prime-time.html

Naman Mandhan  Your comments are really interesting!  I think having a diverse group of contributors is a great idea, as we can learn much by sharing stories and ideas.

I wonder if partnering with community members that use a particular credit union might be an interesting approach in terms of local needs and storytelling.  From the challenge brief;  "Credit unions are member-owned and exist to serve their members and be a safe place for saving and borrowing. They’re focused on community and often linked to local organizations."   I am aware of  credit unions in NYC that are associated with Settlement Houses, Community Service Organizations, which have historically provided multiple social services within low income and immigrant communities.  Are there credit unions in your area that are affiliated with local organizations where you might find members to share this idea with?

Example from NYC:  University Settlement
http://www.universitysettlement.org/us/programs/
http://www.usfcu-nyc.org  

Looking forward to watching this idea develop!