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Portable Clean Rooms Using Recycled Shipping Containers

Recycle steel shipping containers. Retro fit them to create portable clean rooms that can be outfitted with automatic showers to help disinfect care workers. Shipping containers are available around the globe. A used shipping container can be easily altered to make an isolated clean room where care workers can safely get sprayed off by a mist of chlorine water, then safely remove their clothing and walk into another section of the container to disrobe and dispose of their clothing and then finally take a full shower in the third compartment of the container. We can also retrofit used shipping containers with toilets and commercial grade washing machines to make them available to the general public to prevent the spread of disease.

Photo of Javier Colon
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Shipping containers can be retrofitted to include dressing rooms, decontamination rooms and a showers so that care workers can shower and get dressed in one container and then enter another container to get sprayed with a cholrine solution and dispose of their clothing in a contained environment.
These containers can also be used to create portable toliets outfitted to safely dispose of patients waste. With the frequent lines of patients waiting outside of overcrowded medical facilities, it is important to stop the spread of Ebola from the sick patients waiting around the hospital. So containers can be created to house seperate/individual toliet facilities which sick patients can utiltize. Upon each sick patient using the toilet, a fine automatic mist of chlorine water can disinfect each room which houses an individual toilet to make it safe for the next person to use the facility. The waste can then be collected into a container holding chlorine water which can kill the infectious waste material. Once the waste has been treated with a chlorine solution it can then be disposed of more safely. We can easily begin creating these clean rooms/toilet facilities using local shipping containers on the ground in the infected regions or assemble them abroad and ship them completely put together for direct transport to communities affected by Ebola. A major challenge is not only fighting the disease but preventing it's spread and we must find cleaner ways to dispose of waste in these communities. In Liberia for instance only one-third of Monrovia's 1.5 million residents have access to clean toilets. This must be a major factor in the spread of Ebola. So let's start building the infrustructure needed to prevent the spread of Ebola and protect the spread of other diseases at the same time.

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Photo of alex boyd
Team

Very useful indeed. Companies like http://www.azteccontainer.com/ can absolutely give a hand on this mission.

Photo of Edward (E. Barry) Skolnick, M.S.
Team

Javier, your idea includes repeated mentions of "chlorine water" as the misting disinfectant to be used. Large volumes of this fluid would be needed under your scheme, raising problems of respiratory exposure of workers and patients to emissions of highly-toxic toxic chlorine gas; also, concentrated chlorine bleach (if used as the source for your "chlorine water") is made to be highly alkaline (pH ~12) for stable shelf-life, and this alkalinity can pose exposure and waste-handling risks to persons, as well.

Please see my OpenIDEO "Research" phase contribution at URL: "https://openideo.com/challenge/fighting-ebola/research/the-epa-has-adopted-a-better-bleach-innovation-of-acid-neutralized-ph-adjusted-bleach-replacing-the-usual-alkaline-water-dilutions-for-facility-surface-and-ppe-disinfections-during-anthrax-incidents-and-decon-exercises-why-not-then-for-ebola". An acid-neutralized ("amended" or "pH-adjusted" chlorine bleach) formulation would have much higher concentration of the germicidal hydrochlorous acid (HClO) molecule near neutral pH, than does the typically water-diluted and alkaline (pH>11) bleach, so would be predicted to deactivate Ebola virus much more rapidly (perhaps in seconds) under misting-spray treatments of PPE before doffing it, than does the conventionally water-diluted alkaline bleach.

Also (notionally), because the "enveloped" Ebola filovirus is regarded as being highly susceptible to inactivation by disinfectants (i.e., very low on the "Spaulding hierarchy") substantially more-dilute bleach solutions could be used for reliable Ebola virocidal disinfection than may be needed with alkaline bleach (or "chlorine water"), thereby both improving Ebola disinfection cost-effectiveness, and reducing risks to healthcare workers from handling larger quantities of toxic chlorine in more concentrated alkaline bleach solutions. The innovation of pH-adjusted bleach as an improved sporicidal disinfectant has long been adopted by US EPA (but without the higher dilution) for anthrax-spore bioterrorism response preparedness, but needs some R&D to adapt it optimally, safely, and effectively, to global public health virocidal needs, like for reliable Ebola disinfection.

Note also the Medicin Sans Frontieres' standard practice of spray-disinfection of PPE before removal, according to its illustrative poster available at URL: "https://d3gxp3iknbs7bs.cloudfront.net/attachments/edbd3865-4698-4f4e-bf04-a45ecdaff57e.pdf", as linked to the OpenIDEO's "Fighting Ebola Challenge" Brief at URL: "https://openideo.com/challenge/fighting-ebola/brief.html". -- ebskolnick

Photo of Javier Colon
Team

I didn't know that another disinfectant could be used. I only knew that currently chlorine is their main disinfectant being used.

Thanks for the information!

Photo of Rebecca Buechel
Team

mobility aspect is great to reach infected areas as they appear; also "mist of chlorine water" can also be from just from a spray can rather than a complex system

Photo of Javier Colon
Team

There isn't anything complex to a mist sprayer. My aim is to reduce the number of people involved with the disinfection process. It's challenging to spray yourself down with a spray can. But having a pump action mist spraying shower can be very helpful. People are not reliable to spray a can of cleaner around a bathroom to disinfect it. I believe that it's very important to automate the disinfectant process in a toilet. Just look at how quickly a cruise ship can get infected with a stomach virus... simply from people not washing their hands after the use the facilities. Automating the disinfectant process can diminish human error.

Photo of Rebecca Buechel
Team

spray cans could be used while your systems are being built

Photo of Javier Colon
Team

I think sprayers are being used currently. Similarly to the pump sprayers used to spray fertilizer on your plants. I have seen this equipment being used regularly.