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Use a UV visible-only compound to assess whether healthcare workers are inadvertently contaminating themselves when taking off protective gear.

The idea is to use a UV visible-only, water-soluble compound, such as CalcoFluor or GloGerm, to assess whether healthcare workers are inadvertently contaminating themselves while putting on or taking off their clothing and performing tasks. Healthcare workers will douse their gloves in water containing this compound, perform required tasks, then take off their hazmat suit. After they have taken off their suit, a UV light will be turned on to evaluate whether they have inadvertently contaminated themselves or surfaces with this compound. This exercise will provide visual feedback on whether they are adhering to protocol and underscore how easy it is to contaminate surfaces.

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Team

Hi David, interesting post! Any chance you could find an image to go along with it? Images help grab attention and tell a story with higher impact. You should be able to use the Update Entry button on the right of your post and follow the instructions to add images from there. We know occasionally people have issues uploading images so let us know by hitting the Feedback button at the bottom of most pages of our site if you face any problems. Looking forward to seeing more of your inspiring insights on OpenIDEO.

And here's some tips on adding visual goodness to your idea: http://ideo.pn/vis-uals plus more on evolving your thought-starter: http://ideo.pn/oi-evolve

Photo of M. Ricciardi
Team

Hi David

This would be an ideal adjunct technology for my socio-metric badge concept (for contact tracing amongst healthcare workers), see:
https://openideo.com/challenge/fighting-ebola/highlights/using-social-metric-sm-badges-to-monitor-potential-exposure-and-expedite-contact-tracing-amongst-healthcare-providers

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi David! Thanks so much for joining the conversation with your amazing insights, expertise and passion. Congratulations on making our highlights list, we were really impressed by the potential your idea has to help rapidly equip care communities in the fight against Ebola and we hope that it will inspire the community to contribute more to the cause. Thank you!

Photo of Raul Villaseca
Team

I think a good method to train health personnel.

Photo of Rebecca Buechel
Team

Here's the cnn chocolate example showing inadequacies in CDC protocol http://edition.cnn.com/video/?/video/health/2014/10/14/sgmd-gupta-ebola-suit-demo.cnn&video_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2FqSWEdFoQhR

Photo of Chris Davies
Team

Or if you don't have glowgerm, my idea on here is just to use plain old paint.

Photo of Rebecca Buechel
Team

Did you see on TV (cnn int'l) Dr. Sanjay did this exercise using CHOCOLATE as a marker & showed how even following the CDC protocol, two vulnerable spots occurred on his skin.

Photo of David K
Team

Paint and chocolate both sound like very cost-effective ways to do this! Perhaps a two-tier training system could use both, starting with paint to see what you're doing and then graduating to UV.

Photo of Ursula
Team

Hi David, interesting idea! You may want to see these videos about donning and doffing the PPE to identify during which steps or on which elements of the suit should the chemical/substance be applied:
Donning PPE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5knZceQ1xA
Doffing PPE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ls69Tib1PjU

Photo of David K
Team

That looks quite tricky!

Photo of Emily Nghiem
Team

http://www.inquisitr.com/1533349/xenexs-germ-zapping-robots-eradicate-ebola-mrsa-c-diff-in-minutes-with-ultraviolet-light/

I read about UV machine used to disinfect whole rooms of Ebola traces.

Photo of Jab Thorn
Team

This would be goo for training. One doctor says it takes 14 hours to train how to put on and take off. Anything that could cut the time down would be good. They could perhaps disrobe under UV light so they could see exactly at what spot the contamination occurs. I think you could also douse a manikin to see where the contamination is usually picked up.

How expensive and hard to make is the SYBR Green? Could it be sprayed on vomit before being cleaned up to provide a trace in real circumstances?

Photo of David K
Team

SYBR Green is probably way too expensive. Apparently they do this for radiation training; I looked up the compound that they use, it's called CalcoFluor. There's also a melamine bead suspension used in healthcare called GloGerm. I'll update the idea to reflect this.

http://www.radpro.com/dye.pdf