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Fall Prevention Suspenders [Update 05/30 - Prototype & Feedback]

A pair of active suspenders that detects falls and contracts to counteract the falling.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
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Who is your idea designed for and how does it enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls?

Our solution is designed for seniors who have previously fallen. After falling, many of them are afraid to fall again. Therefore, individuals decrease their physical activity which increases their risk of falling; a vicious cycle. The fall prevention suspenders prevent falls actively and dispel the patients fear to fall. These suspenders are a perfect solution to break this cycle, create confidence and give seniors their independence back.


Description

Our solution prevents falls by contraction of trouser suspenders. The suspenders are worn over the shoulders and fixed on the hips with a belt. Motors are integrated in the front and the back of the belt. If a person begins to fall, sensors located at the chest detect the fall and start a feedback control, which controls the motors to pull the suspenders in the front and the back. The user becomes stabilized and the fall can be prevented.  The powering battery is only used when a fall happens and therefore only needs to be charged after a prevented fall. 

The solution is lightweight and can easily be worn under a t-shirt or dress. Seniors do not want to show their need for a medical device, therefore the Prevenders are discreet and invisible. A visible sign of needing help, like a big red button for emergency calls, can be a trigger for seniors to reduce social interaction. Our invisible solution enables seniors, which have already fallen, to live their life as before, without the fear of falling and the social stigma of a visible supporting device. Furthermore, it offers maximum comfort and perfectly integrates into a person's life, since many already wear a belt or even suspenders.

Due to the use of cheap components (suspender belts, small motors) the solution comes with a low price tag. 

Overall, our solution prevents falls by an active mechanism of pulling suspenders and stabilizing the upper body of seniors. It offers maximum comfort through invisibility and integration in an everyday object. No special training or knowledge is required. 

User Story



Market and Competition

Our solution is made especially for seniors living on their own who have previously fallen and are afraid of falling again. Currently, there are 2.6 million seniors in need of care in Germany and this number is expected to rise up to 3.4 million in 2050. While the number of seniors in need rises, the number of nursing staff stays the same. Due to high demand of patient care, there is an increasing need for technology that supports seniors to prolong their independence. A lot of companies already offer solutions for seniors to wear and call for help when they're in need, e.g. SOS buttons. However, there currently isn't any technical solution to actually prevent falls. The only solutions on market are physical training for seniors to help reduce the risk to fall. There are not currently wearable devices that work day to day.

Team & Current Work

Our team consists of a mechatronics engineer, a electronics engineer, and a designer. We have been working on falling detection hardware for seniors for over 2 years and are highly motivated to finally prevent falls at all. We are currently building our first working prototype as a proof of concept and intend to test this on seniors by the end of 2017.


Progression of the Idea:


Updates

05/30 - Prototype testing

We attached a small motor of an RC-car to the prototype, which is supposed to pull the belts and therefore create forces to stop people from falling. However, the motor was too weak to show any effect on the wearer of the belt. Having a second person to pull on the belts, showed that the belts are able to put forces on the body to put someone in an upright position. To do so a very strong electric motor needs to be used.

05/29 - First Prototype try on

We built the first version of our prototype, where the printed belt connection is attached to all belts from our first design. The belts go over the shoulders, around the chest and around the waist. The length of the belts can be adapted individually to fit every person. Our first findings are:

  • Plain belt slips over shoulders and is unable to transfer forces -> improved it by using adhesive type, silicon prints could improve the grip for a production version
  • Belts around the chest should be elastic to not impede on breathing  
  • Other belts can be rigid but need to be comfortable


05/28 - Design Mock Up

  

The Prevenders would be made to be worn under clothing. This mock up is a version of what the Prevenders could look like. The fabric is breathable, with a stretchable chest waistband for breathing. The aim of the mock-up is to show others that wearing a device to help with falling does not have to necessarily look like a "medical tool". The Prevenders should not be noticed under clothing, but make the user feel confident and good in it. Different designs would be made for females and males and possibly different skin tones.

05/25 - Printed belt connection

The first part of our prototype is ready: the belt connection. This will be located at the chest and will connect all the belts, that wrap around the body. The belt on the lower end will be connected to a motor, while the other belts have the purpose of transferring the forces to the body. 

05/25 - Feedback

We proposed the system to Ellen, a 82-year old, very active lady, already wearing a bracelet with a SOS-button to call for help since she has already fallen three times. She told us about her experience with the bracelet, which she is wearing most of the time, but sometimes she forgets to put it on or doesn't want to wear it in public. This fits our previous experience, where many seniors told us, they sometimes forget to wear it or put it on their bedside stand. Nonetheless, she told us the bracelet gives her a feeling of security since she knows she can get help if something happens. She reported that many seniors are not willing to wear a SOS-bracelet, since they don't admit that they are in need of it. Regarding the suspenders, she was skeptical, if it is too complex to put these on an everyday basis. She also told as about seniors, which are afraid of electronics worn on the body and that we should consider the negative impact on pacemakers. If she would wear the suspenders, she would expect them to prevent all falls regarding the time-consuming process of putting them on. Based on this first feedback we conclude:

- The suspenders must be designed to be as comfortable as possible to wear and to put on

- The early adopters are probably people, which have serious trouble with falling and are willing to try out this advanced solution

- The suspenders must be able to prevent most of the falls to get accepted

If you have a relative that could need the suspenders, someone who could use it or just want to say something about it please give us feedback via our Google Survey:

https://goo.gl/forms/UgwC0U9E7gDL0uBX2


05/22 - Prototype Creation

CAD Design of the belt connection is done! It now needs to be 3D-printed and connected to the belts and the motor, so we can start the first tests!

Current steps: build prototype, get feedback from seniors and orthopedists



What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

Based on the first idea prototype in the picture, we made a first feasibility observation and it seems to work. As next we will build a conceptual prototype out of bought suspenders and perform further tests. Furthermore we will talk to seniors to find out if a solution like this is desirable or not.

What skills, input, or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

As engineers we mostly come up with practical solutions, which aren't beautifully designed. Therefore we could need help in developing a appealing design, which is ergonomic and comfortable to wear. Furthermore we would be thankful for any feedback about the viability, desirability and feasibility of the idea. Also the OpenIDEO network can connect us to experts and people passionate about social technologies.

How long has your idea existed?

  • 0-3 months

This idea emerged from

  • A student collaboration

Tell us about your work experience:

We are a group of students, that developed a falling recognition shoe sole during a makeathon two years ago. Ever since we have been active in further developing this idea. Therefore, we have been working with seniors and relatives and one of us is currently pursuing his master thesis on this topic.

How would you describe this idea while in an elevator with someone?

One out of three people over 60 falls at least once a year. A fall does not only cause physical harm but also has strong psychological effects. To prevent seniors from that we are developing the first technological solution to prevent falls. Equipped with an intelligent falling recognition and a dual-actuator technology our suspenders will put a tripping person back into an upright position.

How does your idea demonstrate our Criteria of Affordability?

Since there is a high percentage of seniors falling each year, through insurance etc. it is costing both the individual and taxpayer (2.8 billion euro annual costs for broken hips in Germany). Our suspenders could cut these costs down to zero, since they prevent falls at all. We suggest, that if a patient purchases our suspenders, health insurances cut down the costs of the insurance for an applicable amount. We also cut down the costs of production by using only a few components.

How does your idea demonstrate or plan to demonstrate scalability?

We plan to offer our suspenders to nursing services, nursing homes and also hospitals. Nursing services, like the red cross, already provide help to a lot of elderly living at home. These services could act as a reseller or people could rent the suspenders from them. Providing the seniors with such a technology enables the seniors to be more independent and less in need of the nursing service, therefore the service could reduce costs. This also applies to nursing homes.

How do you plan to measure the impact of your idea?

We want to gather qualitative feedback from first test users to measure how big the impact of the suspenders on improving the life of an individual is. Is s/he able to live more independently? Does s/he feel more secure? Did her/his social interaction improve by wearing the solution? Quantitatively we plan to measure the amount of falls that have been prevented. This number can then be converted into a value for saving money and therefore the savings for the society.

What are your immediate next steps after the challenge?

After the challenge, we want to build a full-scale proof of concept prototype, which includes all actuators and sensors, which are necessary for the product. With this prototype, we will go to seniors and let them try it out for several days to gather more feedback. As soon as the proof of concept is done, we want to find partners, which help us make the suspenders a reality. This will be first customers as well as manufacturers.

33 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of victoria longino
Team

7/22/19--Hi--This product sounds really promising for people of any age who are at risk for falling. Would it work to protect, stabilize, and keep from falling Parkinson's patients who fall due to orthostatic hypotension? My friend has this problem, male, 6'4". Thanks, VML

Photo of Srijay
Team

Hi Lucas,

I wonder if the analysis can be used to for posture correction or even discovery worsening posture.

- Srijay

curbd: https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/fall-prevention/finalfeedback/an-assistive-device-for-curb-elevation-detection

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas and team

Thank you for all your hard work in this challenge and dedication.

All of the ideas posts are locked but the comments section is still open, so please feel free to look at other ideas and comment on them, seek feedback on your idea etc.

I know I have asked many ideators this question but I am asking again as some ideas pivoting in the challenge. Would you say your idea is Most Viable or Most Promising? How would the incentives associated with that Award (Most Viable/Most Promising) be helpful for you?

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Kate,

I would say our idea is most promising. Our idea is not developed enough to go to market or a pilot study, but needs to be further developed and the feasibility needs to be further examined. Nonetheless our idea could have a great impact, because it overthrows current fall prevention strategies and tries to solve the problem on a technological basis. If our prevenders are able to prevent people from falling, many other technologies, like fall detection technologies, could become obsolete, because falls would simply not happen anymore. This impact on concerned seniors would be even greater. They wouldn't need to fear falls and they wouldn't need to suffer from fall related injuries. This would enable them to live an independet and confident life. Also society would benefit, since it wouldn't need to take the costs for fall related injuries and since seniors could live longer on their own the need and costs for retirement and nursing homes would decrease rapidly.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas,

It is great to see the feedback and the survey for Prevenders. Are you able to share this with your network? Would you like members of the OpenIDEO community to take the survey as well? Are there any specific types of people you would like to get feedback from?

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Kate,

thanks for your feedback! We just shared this survey with our network in facebook and slack. It might be a little bit hard to get feedback from seniors over this channel and since I am currently in China I don't have access to my focus group of seniors, but let's see. One senior already answered the survey. Yes it would be great if members of the OpenIDEO would take the survey as well. Mainly we want to get feedback from relatives of seniors, which have already fallen or of seniors themselves. But everyone is welcome to contribute and to give feedback in any way, also technical feedback is desired.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas,

Thank you for responding so quickly and I hope you are having a good time in China. Do you have the capacity to amend the survey so people can indicate if they are a senior or relative of a senior etc.?

I suspect a lot of OpenIDEO members have relatives who are seniors. I am going to tag a few people below and, hopefully, they have the capacity to take the survey.

The Survey:

If you have a relative that could need the suspenders, someone who could use it or just want to say something about it please give us feedback via our Google Survey:

https://goo.gl/forms/UgwC0U9E7gDL0uBX2

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Lillian J Warner Isaac Jumba Manjunath Khuyen Bui Gia Gina Michael DF Susan Jackewicz Tuba Naziruddin Bettina Fliegel Kumi MJ Mariah Burton Nelson 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Kate and Lucas.
We are having an OpenIDEO NYC Meet Up tonight. I can share the suggestion to do the survey with people there as well.
Tagging Adhish Patel and Joy .

Photo of Mariah Burton Nelson
Team

Hi Kate and Prevenders Team,

Here are a few thoughts on this subject:

1) I see that your team includes engineers and a designer, and I do not have expertise in either. However, I want to respectfully question your premise as I understand it. I'm frankly dubious about the central concept - that corrective "righting" of the upper body alone will prevent falls - or very many of them.

Falls are caused by a number of things: slipping, tripping, poor eyesight or hearing, medications, high blood pressure, poor gait, poor balance...

In the case of tripping, if the head and torso lurch forward while the feet stay behind, I don't think any amount of straightening the torso will help; the problem is that one cannot stand unless the hips or legs or both are below the torso. So the problem is the torso/hips relationship, not the bending of the torso.

In other words, it's not the shape of the torso that is the problem, it's that the torso is no longer over the hips/legs/feet. I'm not sure I'm explaining this well, but can you imagine a person bent over until they are in the shape of the small letter "r"? Even if that cross-bar of the "r" (the torso) is straight, the problem (being off balance and heading toward a fall) remains, since the torso is not over the legs (the downward stroke of the "r.")

Now, if the suspenders extended down into the hips, and could right the entire body... that might be a step in the right direction - albeit one can also fall with a perfectly aligned legs/hips/torso; imagine slipping on the ice and simply falling flat, like a statue knocked off its pedestal. Again, the problem is not the curvature, but the overall balance and erect posture of the person.

2) Your idea got me thinking, and this question arises: What if we treated fall prevention like a life-and-death situation? (Which it sometimes is.) What if we decided it was imperative that certain people NEVER fall? We could leave them in wheelchairs, but no one who is able to walk really wants that.

So... We might do what construction workers and mountain climbers do: Use harnesses that are connected to lifelines (ropes) with those lifelines attached to something secure (such as, in the case of workers and climbers, a chimney on a roof, or a boulder on a mountaintop).

Now, using your idea as a springboard, I'm starting to imagine this very outside-the-box scenario (Kate and Bettina Fliegel I realize we're beyond the ideation phase but am including this in case it sparks other ideas that are useful): Picture a trolley car with an overhead wire. Or - Picture a hanging curtain that can encircle a bed in a hospital room.

What if vulnerable seniors who are living in retirement homes could wear harnesses that were attached via rope to a stable overhead steel curtain-rod sort of thing that extended throughout the home and into their apartments? (Yes, doors would present challenges.) In this (very outside the box) scenario, a person who falls would be caught before they reach the ground. Just as a mountain climber or construction worker does not die in a fall because they are caught by the harness, rope, and anchor, so too the old person would be caught, and then could right herself or be rescued from her half-fallen position by others, if she needed help. Imagine how confident people would be then, walking down halls securely harnessed to something above them!

Just sayin... because this is a welcoming place for all ideas!

Meanwhile: Good luck to all of you as you test and refine your ideas.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Would be great!

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Mariah,

1) Yes you are right, it is not proven yet, that the prevenders can actually prevent falls and as you stated there is a good chance that they can't. We are currently exploring this with our first prototype and see where we need to change things or introduce new designs, that also include the lower body.

2) This is actually a great idea, which could easily be introduced in retirement homes. The only question is if old people would accept this solution. We experienced that many don't want to show that they are in need of help and feel already uncomfortable with the SOS-bracelet. By the next chance I will talk to a retirement home about this.

Thank you very much for your feedback!

Photo of Mariah Burton Nelson
Team

Hi Lucas,

Glad you're exploring the lower body too.

Thanks for letting me know you're receptive to my responses to your ideas. With that encouragement... here's another thought:

True, many elders (and "youngers") are reluctant to reveal vulnerabilities, and, in the case of old people, don't want to broadcast the fact that they're old.

However, old people are not all the same. And over time, many accept a number of assistive devices, and get used to them.

My mother, for instance, adamantly rejected a cane, then accepted it, then "wouldn't be caught dead" using a walker, then accepted it, then HATED the prospect of using a wheelchair, and now accepts that that is simply her fate.

Others may accept these things more readily. In any case, I caution you against making generalizations about old people because they're simply people - and the strong desire to stay out of the hospital, and not break a hip or other bones, can often overcome any reluctance to appear frail, needy, or old.

All the best to you as you continue to refine your idea.

Photo of Nico Bentenrieder
Team

Mariah Burton Nelson thank you for your detailed feedback. I worked on our first functionality prototype today and experienced some of the issues we had in mind and you mentioned in your comment (see Prototype Update in our contribution).

1) In its current state it just supports in the case of imbalance. It definitely won't help if a person slips, turns unconcious, trips or loses muscel contraction in the legs. During ideation we focussed more on user experience than on feasibility which is why we still have to explore that. The first prototype actually gave us some insights on what might work and what is a deadend.

2) I really like your approach here. I have been playing around with something similar - a cart were people can sit in and walk while they are carried (like the thing for toddlers). Lucas already mentioned why we didn't pursue this further, but you are right with your caution about generalization.

We will see where all this leads us, but it is always nice to get such valuable feedback.

Photo of Susan Jackewicz
Team

Hi Lucas,
I like that you want to help those who have already fallen feel more secure in their movements. Just took your Google survey, and think you'll get a lot of different ideas for feedback. Encasing the wires in the suspenders, even up to more of the vest arrangement, I agree would help give a bit more feeling of security. I know in caring for my mother, I used gait belts of varying widths - some even had extra webbing and padding in areas to help distribute the weight. You might consider varying encasement design for the Prevenders for different areas of the body to help in the weight distribution....and give more of a feeling of security. I'd just note though, if it's something designed for people to wear everyday underneath their usual clothing, particularly for people in warmer climates being breathable will go a long way in encouraging daily use.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Thank you very much for your feedback and for taking the survey. The breathability is a good point!

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas and team,

It is great to see the new design for the suspenders and the user experience map. In the user experience map, it is mentioned that Susan meets a specialist. Who would that specialist be? Also, when do you think you would be able to build a full-scale proof of concept prototype? Would you need additional expertise to be able to do this?

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Kate,

Thanks for your answer and your questions. Since we want to distribute the suspenders through nursing services, like "Rotes Kreuz" in Germany, the specialist could for example be one of their therapists. On the other side we plan to work together with orthopedists. Their stores would be another point of contact and advice for the suspenders.
About the prototype: this weekend we will build a first prototype to test the effectiveness of a motor putting a person in an upright position and where to position the motor to get the maximum effect. Also different belt arrangements will be tested. This will all be done by easy and cheap components. From that on we will work iteratively and incrementally towards the full scale proof of concept together with seniors. From a technological point of view we have the basic skills to build that prototype. The biggest challenge at this idea is to get the suspenders to recognise and act quickly enough to prevent a fall. This really must happen in the timespan of a single blink. Therefore we will either need to find already existing products which fulfill our requirements or work directly together with manufacturers. Here maybe a mentor could help us, who could bring us together with companies. Furthermore support in designing the algorithms (controlling, fall recognition, machine learning) would be definitely helpful, since it will be a lot of work to do and we are currently only two engineers working on the idea. Last but not least financial support would be needed, since we probably can't pay for a prototype on this level out of our own budget - unfortunately we are still students. I think if we get enough help we are able to build the proof of concept by the end of this year.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas,

It is great to read all the updates on your idea and about the testing you are planning. Are you able to video it or take photos of the session?

Have you been able to get some feedback from older adults on the new designs? Maybe they could give some feedback from the different belt configurations or the user experience map?

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Kate,

Sure! We will provide videos and/or photos of the prototyping session.
We also start to ask older adults for their feedback with our reviewed storyboard!
The belt configuration is more a technical matter, since we need to be able to prevent falls in different directions (front/back, right/left). To do so we need to find a belt - motor configuration, which can change the body position in all relevant angles.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas and team,

We are half-way through the refinement phase and I can’t wait to see continued updates on your idea. More information can be found in the refinement toolkit which can be found at the top of the refinement phase page.

An easy first step is to complete the refinement questions which can be found by logging into your OpenIDEO account and selecting the ‘Edit Contribution’ button on the top left hand corner.

If you scroll down to the bottom, you can see the five added questions with a character limit (including spaces) to help you focus your answer. The questions start with "How would you describe this idea while in an elevator with someone? (what's the elevator pitch for this idea?) - 400 character limit"

In addition to answering these questions it would be helpful if you could mention how your solution fits in the market in the ‘full description’ section of your post. Who are your competitors and how is your idea unique?

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to me, my email address is krushton@ideo.com

Hope to see you on the refinement call this Friday at 9 am PST.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Kate,

sorry, we haven't updated anything yet. We currently only work in our slack group. We will update the refinement questions until friday and start updating more the next week. I hope I can see you again on the refinement call, but I recently moved to China for an exchange semester, so it could be difficult for me because of the time difference of 15 hours. Nonetheless I hope at least one of my teammates can join.
See you soon!

Lucas

Photo of Jackie Toale
Team

I love this idea. Have you thought about a vest design vs. suspenders? The ability to use leverage some of the sensory calming features of a more substantial article (not to mention ease and ability to add additional bio feedback or other features) may be worth looking into. If fear of falls causes inactivity, using a design that adds a sense of safety (compression, weight, etc. used for people with sensory issues) could possibly help increase mobility.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas!

Welcome to the refinement phase.

There are also a few ideas from previous OpenIDEO challenges that might interest you.

All-Generation Friendly ATM (a finalist idea from our financial longevity challenge) -
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/financial-longevity/top-ideas/all-generation-friendly-atm - has a good video of the prototype to articulate the user journey and how the product works

Sweat band (a top idea from our past healthy lives challenge) is a physical monitoring product -
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/healthy-lives/top-ideas/rekindle-the-sweat-band - it has a good example of a user profile, user journey and direct consumer feedback. They have also thought about how they could advertise their product.

Photo of eldy wullur
Team

Hi Lucas,
Very interesting because you focus on the elderly who have fallen and the effort not to fall again. Psychically in this period, the elderly will be very haunted by fear, because the body is vulnerable, body resistance has been greatly decreased. And drastic reduction of activity. I sincerely hope and encourage you to produce the best because this tool is really an urgent need.

Photo of Khuyen Bui Gia
Team

Hey Lucas Spreiter , I really like this technological wizardry! Have you thought of sandwiching these suspension components between two shirts (so that you can hide the details)? I thought that might be an easy way to improve the look.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Khuyen!

Thanks for your feedback. We haven't thought of that yet, but this would be a nice idea to make it more discreet. Thanks!

Photo of Manjunath
Team

Hi Lucas,
I like the idea of suspenders to detect falls and get them back into stable state. What kind of motors are you thinking of using? How will the sensors talk to the motors? I am wondering if the suspenders will put stress on their shoulders or back.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Manjunath,

thanks for your feedback. Motors are a good question, they need to be light, fast, precise and produce enough torque to stabilize the person. So thats not an easy question. The german company Faulhaber has some flat dc-motors for example, which I think should be suitable. They currently developed a motor for an automated fall protection for climbers (https://www.faulhaber.com/de/global/maerkte/umwelt-personenschutz/automatisches-sicherungssystem-fuer-kletterer-epic/ , http://www.auroco.de/en/).

The suspenders will have a controller board, which connects the sensors to the motors and also does the fall detection.

I think stress is mainly put onto the shoulders, but it would be better to put more stress on the back. Maybe a second belt around the chest could improve this design here to put more stress on back and chest and less on the shoulders.

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congratulations on being today's Featured Contribution!

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Nice! Thank you! :)

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Lucas!

Thank you for sharing your project. It is really interesting!

Do you have any video footage of the suspenders? Then we can see how it works in reality and how responsive it is.

How does it differentiate between falling and bending?

How would you remind older adults to recharge the battery?

Would you tell me more about the falling recognition shoe sole you made during the makeathon two years ago? Would you consider submitting that as a project idea?

Is your team based in Germany?

Khuyen Bui Gia and Lillian J Warner - I would love your ideas on how to improve the design.

Photo of Lucas Spreiter
Team

Hello Kate,

thanks for your feedback. We actually just started to work on this idea, so we can't provide any video footage yet.
The differentiation between falling and bending can either be done with the detection of exceeding a certain acceleration (falling happens way faster than bending) or with a falling pattern recognition. The first one is rather unaccurate but we already made good experiences with the latter one for falling detection.
Reminding to charge the battery should be made acustically and visually. A red light will indicate, that the battery needs to be charged and after the suspenders are taken off an acustic signal will remind the senior to charge.

The falling recognition shoe sole detected falls based on pattern recognition and sent an alert to relatives via SMS with the location of the senior, if a fall occurred. However, most of the falls occur at home and seniors tend to only wear slippers or no shoes at home. Furthermore it is not feasible to have the falling recognition in all shoes or as an inlay sole, since many wear special tailored shoes and it would be a hassle to change the sole from one shoe into another all the time. Therefore I focus on an easier gadget for falling recognition. I do not really consider to submit this, since it does nothing to prevent falls, it only detects them.

Yes we are based in Germany.

We are happy for get any feedback!