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pathVu - Accessible Pedestrian Navigation [5/29, edited Homer's Journey, user journey, user feedback, Prototype, partners, OpenIDEO quest]

pathVu is building a tool that navigates pedestrians along the most accessible and walkable routes to increase safe and independent travel.

Photo of Eric Sinagra
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Who is your idea designed for and how does it enable older adults to live their best possible life by preventing falls?

We started pathVu with a focus on helping people with disabilities. My brother and our co-founder both use wheelchairs. We believe that designing for accessibility is universal design, and helps all pedestrians. Our navigation tool will allow older adults to travel more independently, confidently, and safely along sidewalks. It will tell them the most walkable routes to travel, the location of potential tripping hazards, and even places to sit. It encourages people to be active through walking.

Problem

Pedestrians face significant health risks when traversing a pathway that has not been maintained or was poorly designed.  One in three older adults (>65 years) experiences a fall each year, many of which occur outdoors.  The result costs the U.S. $30 billion in direct medical costs annually.  Falls are the most common reason for traumatic brain injuries among adults and children.  Among wheelchair users, tips and falls are the most common source of injury and they occur most frequently when the wheelchair user is traversing outdoor terrains that are not flat.  Additionally, wheelchair users are subjected to unhealthy levels of vibration exposure due to rough pathways, and are twice as likely to suffer from back and neck pain.  Wheelchair users cite the environment as a significant barrier to their social participation, second only behind problems with their wheelchairs. These adverse pathway conditions (APCs) translate into reduced social participation.

Another challenge that pedestrians face is the uncertainty of the path that is ahead of them.  Is there a sidewalk?  Are there curb ramps?  Are there clearly marked crosswalks?  How accessible/walkable is the path?  Common pedestrian navigation tools, such as Google Maps, Apple, or Bing, use the roadway to navigate pedestrians rather than the sidewalk.  At times, a person could be directed down a road that has no sidewalks.  Furthermore, they do not know about the quality of the path.

Solution

pathVu’s pedestrian navigation tool solves this problem.  pathVu provides the user with the most accessible route that contains sidewalks, crosswalks, curb ramps, and limits tripping hazards.  This route is tailored to the user’s specific needs and settings.  If a user wants to travel a route that has a curb ramp at each intersection, the route will include curb ramps.  By selecting the route that limits tripping hazards, older adults will be less susceptible to dangerous conditions that could cause them to fall.  This will also help older adults to become more active in the community to live healthier lives by increased walking.  Similarly, this applies to wheelchair users and all other pedestrians.  A prototype of the pathVu navigation tool has been developed.  The initial launch will be available for all computer and smartphone users via a website.  Future versions will be included in the pathVu mobile app.  This version will alert pedestrians by vibration and sound as they approach a hazard.

The data used for routing can also be used to prioritize improvements to the sidewalk infrastructure.  Pedestrians can use pathVu’s data and navigation tools to advocate to their local government for improved sidewalks.  One of pathVu’s goals is to work with cities and municipalities to manage their sidewalks and get the problems fixed.  Through the use of this data, we can help eliminate the original problem…tripping hazards and dangerous sidewalks.

Data collection tools

PathMeT: PathMeT is a manually propelled stroller-like device that pathVu uses to collect high resolution, highly accurate data about sidewalks and pathways.  Data includes: tripping hazards, running slope, cross slope, roughness, location, and images.


pathVu App: The pathVu app is a free crowdsourcing tool that allows pedestrians to report sidewalk conditions, such as tripping hazards, curb ramp locations, construction, etc.  The pathVu app is free for Android and iPhone smartphones.  It will allow us to scale our routing functionality quickly to different cities.

                                       


CLICK HERE for an interactive map of sample data.


PROTOTYPE

Our prototype (see image under Solution above) is a navigation tool that takes into account sidewalk, crosswalk, curb ramp, and tripping hazard location.  It routes a pedestrian along the sidewalk/crosswalk paths and around potentially hazardous conditions.  This prototype is based on the user feedback that knowing sidewalk location and conditions is a valuable tool in navigating sidewalks safely.  The green line in the image provides the suggested route.  Additional features will be added in the future.  Paper maps can easily be created for non-internet users.

The prototype has not yet been published for public use.


PARTNERS


pathVu was part of The Crossings project to promote safe intersection crossings, hosted by Aging Your Way and Lively Pittsburgh.


pathVu and Lively Pittsburgh conducting a "walkability study" in the East Liberty neighborhood through use of the pathVu app.

What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

An early test of our pedestrian routing would initially include a focus group of older adults, wheelchair users, and other people with disabilities. After the focus group, we would have the participants go into the community to use the app. We would have them travel different routes using three different methods: 1) No navigation tool 2) Existing navigation tool (i.e. Google Maps) 3) pathVu. This test will allow us to gain important insight to the usability of the tool and receive user feedback.

What skills, input, or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

The most important resource to gain is a network of connections, interested stakeholders, and potential users. pathVu believes in designing a product that revolves around the users' desires and needs. This means talking to potential users, receiving input and feedback, and designing based on their comments. In addition, IDEO's experience in UX/UI design will be invaluable in developing a product that older adults can use easily and will want to use.

How long has your idea existed?

  • Over 1 year

This idea emerged from

  • A student collaboration

Tell us about your work experience:

I have a Bachelor's degree in Physics and Mathematics and a Master's in Rehabilitation Science and Technology. I became an entrepreneur three years ago and was part of an accelerator in Pittsburgh. Our team has experience in mechanical engineering, design, and working with people with disabilities.

How would you describe this idea while in an elevator with someone?

1 in 3 older adults fall each year, the majority occurring outdoors. pathVu is developing the "Google Maps for pedestrians" to prevent falls and improve accessibility. Typical pedestrian navigation, like Google Maps, use the roadway to direct pedestrians, sometimes down a road without sidewalks. pathVu's navigation uses the sidewalk/pathway location and quality to inform you of the safest routes.

How does your idea demonstrate our Criteria of Affordability?

pathVu focuses on developing tools that are accessible for all, including older adults and people with disabilities. pathVu navigation will be available for free to all pedestrians, which will be accessible via a web app for internet users. A mobile app will be developed later for those who use smartphones. pathVu understands that some people do not use the internet or smartphones, and so we will develop paper maps and partner with local organizations (port authority) to make those available.

How does your idea demonstrate or plan to demonstrate scalability?

pathVu's goal is to implement our pedestrian navigation worldwide. pathVu will start by conducting a pilot project in Pittsburgh with the support of local organizations who have shown interest. Upon successful completion of this pilot, we will begin scaling to other walkable cities because of their expected acceptance of our tools. pathVu expects to grow through the support of community groups collecting data with our app, which was designed for the purpose of scalability.

How do you plan to measure the impact of your idea?

pathVu plans to measure impact in part by the number of recurring users. One of the most powerful ways to know if someone likes your product is whether they use it. We will also measure impact by the feedback that we receive from our users, especially in our pilot project where we will be working closely with older adults and people with disabilities. Finally, impact will be measured by the number of cities using our tool, showing that we are helping more and more people.

What are your immediate next steps after the challenge?

The next steps after this challenge are: 1) Finalize development of pathVu navigation tool 2) Collect appropriate data for pilot project 3) Conduct a pilot in Pittsburgh. pathVu has a prototype of its navigation tool, but further development is required prior to public use. With the help of our local partners, we will collect all of the appropriate data necessary first. Lastly, we will recruit older adults and people with disabilities to be advisors for our Pittsburgh pilot.

50 comments

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Photo of Alex
Team

This is actually a great idea. But the major drawbacks with these kinds of inventions is that these can only be implemented in places where the basic development has been done properly. In other places, these things won’t work properly.
https://www.falconmarketing.com

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric and team

Thank you for all your hard work in this challenge and dedication.

All of the ideas posts are locked but the comments section is still open, so please feel free to look at other ideas and comment on them, seek feedback on your idea etc.

I know I have asked many ideators this question but I am asking again as some ideas pivoting in the challenge. Would you say your idea is Most Viable or Most Promising? How would the incentives associated with that Award (Most Viable/Most Promising) be helpful for you?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Kate, Thank you! We are excited for this next stage! I would say that our idea is considered Most Viable. The incentives and funding would help us to refine our user interface/user experience. It will help us to further develop our navigation tool to include some of the added features that users have expressed interest in. The AARP mentorship will help us to connect with many older adults to increase usage and the potential of making a large impact. The research panel and pilot opportunity will help us to conduct a study and test the navigation tool to receive important information about usability. The next steps for us are to improve the user interface and continually test it with users. Development is an ongoing process that involves feedback from users and software developers to make the improvements. The incentives as part of this challenge would be invaluable in advancing our pedestrian navigation tool. The goal after this challenge is to launch in one city and have the foundation to launch in others.

Photo of Angela Grollmisch
Team

I agree with you - for fall prevention, a lot can be taken from designing accessibility for wheelchair dtivers like opening door, ways free of falling risks, no stairs, call for help, mounting a tram or bus. In fact, architectural design should be revised under this aspect, because any human being would benefit. What if you cooperate with that person designing the apo, forgot the name, sorry. It would enhance both of your solutions. Good luck.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Angela - do you mean Wanderlust: An app to connect walkers ?

Photo of Angela Grollmisch
Team

Yes.

Photo of Valentina Sierra
Team

Thanks, Angela and Kate.
I agree with you, Angela. I recently tested my project and it would had been very useful to know in advance which was the most walkable route so, Eric let me know if you would like us to cooperate.

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Angela and Kate, Thank you for the recommendation. Valentina, I think it would be great to discuss further. Would you be interested in setting up a video chat or phone call? Please email me on the side and we can arrange. Thanks! eric.sinagra@pathvu.com

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric!

We're impressed! Over 40 comments?! We want to point out that not everyone will have time to read all the comments, so make sure you've included information that has helped shape or pivot your idea in the description of your idea above. Keep up the amazing collaboration!

It is great to read your bios because it helps to demonstrate your expertise. Lillian J Warner - I would be interested to know your thoughts on the user journey and stakeholder feedback.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric,

We are half-way through the refinement phase and I can’t wait to see continued updates on your idea. More information can be found in the refinement toolkit which can be found at the top of the refinement phase page.

An easy first step is to complete the refinement questions which can be found by logging into your OpenIDEO account and selecting the ‘Edit Contribution’ button on the top left hand corner.

If you scroll down to the bottom, you can see the five added questions with a character limit (including spaces) to help you focus your answer. The questions start with "How would you describe this idea while in an elevator with someone? (what's the elevator pitch for this idea?) - 400 character limit"

In addition to answering these questions it would be helpful if you could mention how your solution fits in the market in the ‘full description’ section of your post. Who are your competitors and how is your idea unique?

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to me, my email address is krushton@ideo.com

Hope to see you on the refinement call this Friday at 9 am PST.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric,

Welcome to the refinement phase!

There are some ideas from past OpenIDEO challenges you may want to check out for inspiration:

Rightsize (a finalist idea from our financial longevity challenge) has really good user profiles ‘The Dabbler and the Researcher' and a user journey outlining how the user would find out about Rightsize and how they might use the tool - https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/financial-longevity/top-ideas/rightsize - it might give you a few ideas for the user journey for Path Vu

Re-plate (a finalist idea from our food waste challenge) which matches donors of surplus food to recipient has an interesting demo video and user research - https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/food-waste/top-ideas/a-robust-system-for-re-plating-surplus-meals

If you have any questions, please reach out to me on krushton@ideo.com or tag me here using ‘@‘ and Kate Rushton

Photo of eldy wullur
Team

Hello Eric,
Sidewalks have been enemies for pedestrians, not just for wheelchair users but also for women who wear high heels. There is a curved pavement, perhaps to avoid puddles, but the resulting slip even for those who use flat sandals though. I think PathVu can be the way out for everyone, especially the elderly and wheelchair users, when designed for various users.

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Hi Eldy,
I completely agree with you. Although I often refer to people with disabilities and older adults, our goal is to help all pedestrians of all abilities. When I mention accessibility or people with disabilities, I am talking about universal design. We believe that if you design for the wheelchair user or the person who is completely blind, then you are designing for all (with some exceptions). So if you want to know the best route to walk when wearing heels, our goal is to make that happen because we have already collected the important data for the person who is blind and that data affects you, too.

Photo of Fadila Lagadien
Team

I totally agree with you, Eric - Eldy, this is the beauty of universal design. My experience while observing people, I see 90% non-disabled people use ramps instead of stairs given the option because I believe it is easier on the knees. So I ask with tears in my eyes, 'why the need for stairs in the first place?' So, I think the same will happen once Eric's project is completed.

Photo of eldy wullur
Team

Thank you Fadila

Photo of Fadila Lagadien
Team

Eric, although I am half a world away from you, we face the same issues regarding disability and access. I really hope to work with / learn from you as you cover the problems universally. My idea focuses on facilities and services and adding the 'outside' environment now seems like a major omission. However, as I follow you I will learn and refine my idea while giving you the credit:-) Thanks for sharing your idea.

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Fadila,
Thank you for your comments. Please do continue to follow us. Our goal is to one day be global and exist in places like South Africa. And, we will likely need your help to do that! We are still developing some of our tools so that we can scale, but we are not too far away. I think issues with facilities and other services tie closely together with what we are working on.

Photo of Fadila Lagadien
Team

Exciting to hear! I am very happy and willing to be your go-to person in SA:-) Good luck.

Photo of Fadila Lagadien
Team

A great too indeed! I like Bettina's input and you response Eric. I hope It will be something we can use in South Africa. I will track your progress even if it not a winner her (which I hope it is).

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Eric. Thanks for sharing PathVu! I am really happy to see this tool. I had been trying to think about how to use crowdsourcing to map out safe walks for older adults. Combining a free crowdsourcing mechanism with the PathMeT data looks to be a powerful tool! Is the idea that the PathMeT machine would be replicated and used in other communities? Who is currently collecting the data?

Regarding the app could someone potentially input their location and generate a map with the safest route for one to take from their location to a particular destination in the neighborhood? Would one be able to print a map for an older adult who either doesn't use apps, or cannot see the small map on a smartphone?

Would it be possible for the app to have some sort of alert system so that when one is walking they might be alerted if there is a problem with the sidewalk ahead of them based on the data?

Good luck with your testing!

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Bettina,
Thank you for your comments! The idea with PathMeT is that pathVu would be hired to come to a city/neighborhood/community to collect that data to help the community prioritize improvements. Then, the data can be used for the pedestrian routing. We are the only ones collecting data right now. We have considered selling devices directly to organizations, but we are not at that point yet. Also, we have considered going to cities and collecting data on our own, but we do not have the funding to do it in that way yet.

Right now the app is focused on the crowdsourcing of the data (tripping hazards, curb ramps, benches, etc.). The routing tool will initially be available on the computer only, and later on the app. It would indeed let you select your location and destination, as well as allow for printing.

Great suggestion! We have already piloted the alert system but have to work out some bugs. It alerts the user as they approach specific hazards that they have selected.

These are all great comments and suggestions. We appreciate feedback and comments so that we can be sure we design the tools that people want. One of our biggest challenges is getting the data in the first place. If the data does not exist, then our alert and routing systems do not operate to their fullest capacity.

Thanks,
Eric

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Eric.

How are you advertising PathVu so that people know about it and can participate?
I was thinking that this might become part of a hospital discharge plan for people in rehabilitation units. Imagine a patient being discharged either with a walker, or in a wheelchair, as examples. If PathVu was a tool known to the hospital unit's team, nurses, docs, social workers, they could share this with the patient's family early in the discharge planning process, so that they could use it to map out whatever paths their loved one might need to take from home - to market, church, bus stop etc. They might be able to mobilize friends, community, to help them. I think this would be a very powerful tool in this planning as it might create a mechanism for patients to have independence, or at least to go out of the home safely early as they return home after being hospitalized.

Another thought was to market this to an organization that supports family caregivers so that caregivers can become aware of it's potential. They could then go on to mobilize community to map safe routes for their loved ones.

As targeted groups input data the greater communities will benefit.

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Bettina,

We have advertised primarily locally in Pittsburgh thus far. We have partnered with some local organizations and have done some Facebook ads. We have also done some marketing by participating in webinars. We have not done any extensive advertising yet.

I like your ideas of it being used for rehabilitation. I agree, they are definitely potential stakeholders and data collectors. Our goal is for general navigation and basic features be free to the user. But a hospital or rehab unit could potentially purchase more detailed data. Right now we have been focusing on transportation-type organizations.

I think the idea of the family caregivers ties very well with the goal of the crowdsourcing. I, too, could see caregivers and families mapping an area to find safe routes. I am hoping that this pedestrian routing tool that I am suggesting for this project will help demonstrate how the collected data can be used.

Thanks again for your feedback!

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Eric. Interesting. What type of data are you thinking a hospital might be interested in purchasing?

Can you clarify what the pedestrian routing tool you are suggesting is? Is that the crowdsourcing feature?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

I am not positive. I have not tested it yet. Potentially the exact locations of hazards vs just knowing the best routes to travel. I would have to do some market research first.

The crowdsourcing and routing are two different, yet connected pieces. The crowdsourcing is only the ability to submit reports, such as tripping hazards. This feature is currently available in our app. The routing is what I am suggesting be developed as part of this project. We have a prototype of it, but nothing that has been implemented anywhere yet. The routing would use the app data along with other PathMeT data. It would calculate the most accessible route to travel and display that route to the user, initially through a web app and later through our mobile app. Hope this clarifies it. There are a number of moving parts that all come together.

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Yes, it is clear now. Thanks Eric!

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric,

Could PathVU be used for older adults who are on vacation?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

I think on vacation is one of the primary uses of our tool. I see it helping older adults and people with disabilities plan their routes and trip ahead of time. I think it would bring a sense of relief or comfort to know where the pathways are, how accessible it is, and how many issues there are before actually traveling to that place. It might even help to determine which destination to travel. One time my co-founder (who uses a wheelchair) and I were at a conference. We were going up the hill to the hotel to come across construction at the top. So we had to go back down and up the other side in order to get to the hotel. I hope that our routing can help to avoid situations like this. Even as someone who is able to walk well, when I travel I find myself taking longer and less enjoyable paths than I need. Great question!

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric!

Who would be your closest competitor?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Our closest competitor in regards to pedestrian routing is probably companies like Google Maps, Apple, Bing, etc. However, they generally use the road network to route people and do not know about the conditions of the route. We recently heard about some research being done in Seattle that uses sidewalk locations for routing, but it is still in the research phase and they use only open sourced data that already exists.

Photo of Zandri Kuun
Team

Hi Eric,
I really like the concept behind pathVu. It is very concrete! I'm wondering, how will older adults use it to navigate their environments especially those who aren't tech savvy or have to hold onto a walking frame? Do you have any ideas for a hand-free or low-tech solution?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

We have thought of a few ways to make it easier for older adults. First, although it still includes use of a computer, older adults would be able to plan their route on the computer first and print out the map/route. This would be similar to Google Maps or other mapping software. Second, we have prototyped a feature in the app that alerts the user as they approach a hazard. It would vibrate and/or announce the hazard they are approaching. The user can customize which conditions to be alerted to. In the future, this could be integrated with other technology, such as smart watches, hearing aides, and other wearables (including products currently used by older adults).

Our goal is to work with older adults and people with disabilities to ensure that we are developing technology that they will and can use. As part of our development process, we talk with people to understand what it is they want and how it looks. Thank you for your question.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Eric!

Thank you for submitting Path Vu to the challenge. I like the use of crowdsourced user data and data from the PathMeT.

Would you say you are a ‘most viable’ or ‘most promising’ idea - https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/fall-prevention?

Where are you planning to conduct early testing? How often do you think the sidewalks would need to be scanned/tested?

Have you thought about monetisation?

You might want to check out this idea mentioned in the research phase from Taiwan - Our City Love 

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Kate, Thank you for your questions and comments.

I would say that we are a "most viable" idea. We have done work in different cities and will be at a point that we are ready to pilot our routing tool.

Early testing would be conducted in Pittsburgh, since this is where we are from. Our recommendation is that 1/3 of a city be scanned every 3 years. However, this is not always feasible. But, no one actually knows the anwer to that question. Our data will allow us to develop more sophisticated estimates to that question. This is why we offer both PathMeT and the pathVu app. PathMeT is higher quality and higher cost. The pathVu app is lower quality and lower cost. The pathVu app data could be continually updated even without use of PathMeT. Think of how Waze reporters contribute roadway hazards.

We have thought about monetization. We generate revenue in two ways. 1) We perform services to use our PathMeT tool and analyze the pathways of a city/community. We help them prioritize improvements to the infrastructure. 2) We sell a subscription to software and data to help communities analyze and manage data. This includes app data that is included in the community.

Thank you for the suggestion to connect with them. Sounds like another great piece to the routing puzzle!

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

How much is a PathMeT? Do you have a ballpark figure you can share?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Kate, Sorry for the slightly delayed response. We currently do not sell PathMeT devices. We do consulting work and use our PathMeT device for the data collection. The cost for data collection ranges depending on the amount to collect and other scope of work.

Photo of Nick
Team

Eric,

Awesome idea. Do you anticipate needing help with the application?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Nick, I assume you mean with the software development. We have worked with some software development companies before to help with different pieces of the app. But, we may be looking for a developer in the future. Are you a software developer? Anything specific you were thinking?

Photo of Tuba Naziruddin
Team

Hey Eric, I love the idea, you should think about gamifying the experience for the user. Rodney Lobo you should share your insights from your game from the Design Jam. Path me looks like a trendy mobile car.

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Tuba and Eric.
I think there would be two sets of users here. One would be the user who needs information on a safe walking route, the older adults etc. The second would be a user who inputs information, those who contribute to the crowdsourcing. This user might be anyone - old, young, and in any physical condition. For which users are you suggesting ramification Tuba? I wonder if it might be a motivator for users who are inputing data to build this tool?

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Tuba, Thank you for your comment and suggestion. We actually have piloted some with gamifying the reporting aspect of the app...and even paying people for the data that they collect. Users can earn points for the data that they report. We saw pros and cons of using this method and are working on improvements before we launch it again. It might be a little while. Our strategy right now is to work with communities whose employees or volunteers will walk around the community in a systematic way. We like to think of our PathMeT tool as the Google cart for sidewalks. haha

Bettina, You are right. There are two users. Contributors and consumers (I'll call them). Sometimes they are the same and sometimes they are different. Contributors add data. Consumers use the data or routing to understand the best routes for walking/rolling. And yes, the gamification is meant to motivate or incentivize users to report data.

Thanks again for all of the comments!

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congratulations on being today's Featured Contribution!

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

That's great! Thank you!

Photo of Nick
Team

Great idea Eric

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Thanks!

Photo of Gregg Helfer
Team

Great idea, Eric!

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Thanks!

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Eric!

Great to have you onboard! We noticed your post is currently unpublished. Was this your intention? We'd love to have it be included in the challenge. You can publish it by hitting the "Publish" button at the top of your post. You can also update your post by clicking on the "Edit Contribution" on top. We're looking forward to seeing your contribution in this challenge.

Photo of Eric Sinagra
Team

Thanks. I did not publish on purpose because I had not completed my submission yet. I am working on a couple sections and will publish within the next few days. Thanks again.

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Thanks Eric!