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A comment on the growing personal and collective memory bank that the internet generation is creating.

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We are living through, and creating a time in which a trail of personal activity and memories is being left by every connected person on the planet.

No where is this more clear than in China.

As two westerners living in Shanghai, we are able to see with an outsiders perspective the level of hyper-connectivity that many people alive today possess, as well its vast potential. The average Chinese adult spends 40 minutes a day on We Chat. That is 243 hours, or 3% of every year.

These online interactions often involve posts of personal meaning or interest, whether or not they represent who you are in your dying years. In fact, these posts will be part of our footprint in history; showing what we were passionate about or interested in at a specific time or place. What moved us, what motivated us, what we found funny or strange. 

Whether we like it or not these interactions illustrate part of who we are. As time moves on, our ability to document a richer spectrum of our lives will increase. This digital footprint will allow us to access a depth of community and a vivid remembrance of life unavailable to any previous generation.

What is a provocation or insight that might inspire others during this challenge?

Whilst the process of communication and understanding of wants and needs is key, we wonder if what we are creating through our internet footprint can be channeled to help inform, curate or inspire the end of life experience. How can we reimagine the end of life for an individual who from the age of 16 has documented almost every day of their life in some shape or form.

Tell us about your work experience:

Shanghai based, one a musician and one a guy working in sustainable innovation.

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