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Listen - Collect - Create [update in description 8.7.16]

Creating stories, tales and legends inspired by the lives lived by our loved ones.

Photo of Jess Paik
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Who is your idea designed for and how does it reimagine the end-of-life experience?

We hope to encourage children to listen, create and tell the stories of their family history to reveal friends or family members at the end of their lives as heroines of a true tale. Families and children will create stories to make the end-of-life experience a magical one.

                            


                                               I REMEMBER  //  RECOLLECT


                                                                Table of Contents

                                                           1   Inspirations - Listen

                                                           2   Ideation - Collect 

                                                           3   Implementation - Create



                                                          INSPIRATIONS

                                                                  Listen  

Kim Ok Sun


                                                                IDEATION 

                                                                        Collect

Image title

A family history is rooted in the traditions and stories that are passed down through generations, yet most families still resort to stories like Cinderella or Beauty and the Beast to tell a tale about endurance, kindness, and love.

Kim's story: "You never know when or how your kindness will repay you"

Everyone has a story - A child's mother, father, aunt, uncle, or grandparents have compelling stories to share that taught them all important and meaningful lessons in life. And before it is too late to know, especially for grandparents, I hope that children will actively listen to the stories most close to their own history and identity and help transform an end-of-life experience into an everlasting one.     


                                                        IMPLEMENTATION

                                                                   Create

[Official Title: I Remember, Recollect, Once Upon a Time] will set up an online community/site where families, and more specifically grandchildren and grandparents, can come together to build their family story or stories. Similar to making an album of photos, this platform will be a place where people can have personal accounts to store any collected photos, interviews, writings and other remnants of their family history. Soon, your personal account would become something like a virtual "Cabinet of Curiosities".

However, to make this a more tangible experience, the online accounts of collected items will act more as a resource for building objects/products. Children and grandparents can browse through the collected items on their accounts to be inspired to make a particular story into more. The option to create a story into an illustration, book, video, music, or performance will also be provided with guidelines and other app tools to facilitate in the making process. 

Website Image title

In summary, this idea is first simply a way to digitally store and collect family stories in forms of photos, objects, writings, recordings and more.

To turn this simple platform into something more, we provide creative ideas and resources in transforming one's collection into creative activities and projects.



                                IDEAS FOR CREATIVE MAKING OF STORIES

http://www.claytiemason.com/

http://www.pre-texts.org

http://conservatorylab.org

http://simplebooklet.com/publish.php?wpKey=3k0QJLcVFvNea7LBG3ux2L

Mother Tongue Books http://matenwaclc.org/mother-tongue-books/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmDO-X_d9YU
"Only a child can know what a child is interested in……"  - from the video.

https://www.thehistoryproject.com


                                                            UPDATES

8/7/2016 - Organization

8/5/2016 - Titles and inspirational additions 

8/3/2016 - online platform photo and title feedbacks

8/1/2016 - Description and website wireframe update 

7/30/2016 - Title feedback, presentation

 

What early, lightweight experiment might you try out in your own community to find out if the idea will meet your expectations?

[update 8.1.16]
Harvard Ed portal students, Shiying and Ashley, were interviewed and assigned with a task to collect a family story. Both of these students interviewed their parents. Ashely wrote a story about her father and wants to make a documentary video about her father. Shiying posted an interview session about her mother on StoryCorps and wants to make an animation about her mother, most likely using animation coding on Scratch.

What skills, input or guidance from the OpenIDEO community would be most helpful in building out or refining your idea?

Please share your stories here! We would love to start filling in requests to help you start your accounts and also archive your stories!

Title Feedback - Please Vote!
1) I Remember when
2) Recollect
3) Once Upon a Time

Attachments (1)

user map.pdf

User Experience Map

47 comments

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Photo of sambhav
Team

nice post....thanks for sharing!!
have a look on my website for various types of templates in different form
http://www.allformtemplates.com/annotated-bibliography-examples-formatstemplates/

Photo of Joanna Spoth
Team

Hi Jess! I wanted to quickly share some feedback we recently received from our sponsors and advisory panel: "We love that your idea is kid-centric. They're such an important part of this conversation and topic. Another part we're a fan of: the fact that your idea ties in family history in a fun way and the focus on storytelling. We can't wait to see it evolve! We're wondering if the name of the overall idea might embrace those pieces a bit more than the fairy tale component it currently focuses on."

We look forward to seeing the exciting progress your idea will make during this last week of the Refinement phase!

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Joanna Spoth Thank you! 
I recently updated the project and listed a title voting. To clarify, I hope this was the title feedback was what was being referred to? I still listed it in the presentation, but in the description, a list of options are listed for commenters to vote. Please let me know your thoughts! 

Photo of Joanna Spoth
Team

It's a great way to get more feedback on your title! Thanks for incorporating our feedback. :)

Photo of Josh Benjamin
Team

How about a name that suggests more of what a kid gets to build...like "Family Story Cabinet"
Also your project reminds me of thehistoryproject.com (which isn't targeting kids at all).

Photo of Joanna Spoth
Team

I love #2! It's a neat thought starter and I could see it easily expanding to marketing efforts. It has an intention and nostalgia from the outset.

Photo of D'vorah
Team

Hi Jess,

Those sound like good solutions for people who want to use this wonderful project but don't have the technology access or technical abilities.  

And I think creating ways of introducing the project and guiding questions  that are oriented to different religious and cultural perspectives and backgrounds is a good idea.  I'd be pleased to discuss with you in more detail and to also provide resource materials.    

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Jess.  The presentation slideshow looks great.  As to why the students are more drawn to interview their parents or siblings…. what does the guideline card ask or suggest that they do?
From a practical point of view if they only had one or two nights to do the assignment they might just interview their immediate family, those they live with.   Are the grandparents easily available to interview?  

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Bettina Fliegel Hello! 
Yes, their grandparents were not easily available and the students only had a few nights to work on this. When I asked them about their grandparents, both said that their grandparents are residing in different states. But do you think that the card guideline should still ask them to interview their grandparents? 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Does the card guideline currently ask them to specifically interview grandparents?  (I can't read it.)

If the goal of your project is to connect kids to their grandparents, and their grandparents' stories, you might have to extend the timeline for them to be in touch with them.  Some children may live closer and have easier access.  If time is limited…... Maybe give options - Those that live nearby to grandparents, or are "close", and though might live far from each other have easy access by phone, or Skype, they are able to interview them.  For the other children maybe suggest interviewing another older relative, parent or other, but give prompts that ask for stories or learnings that the relative had from their parents, or even their grandparents?  (Does that make sense?  capturing stories or wisdom that still goes back another generation, or more?)

Ultimately if this is going to be done in a school setting maybe the assignment can be given with sufficient time for children to be in touch with grandparents even if they are far away.  I might leave it somewhat open in case they have no grandparents.

What are your thoughts about facilitating the conversation?

Photo of Jamie Whittaker
Team

Hi Jess,

My vote is for the "Once Upon a Time" title. I LOVE your idea and I can't wait for it to take off (and for my four month old niece to be old enough to use it)! What a treasure to have these stories to enjoy at all times of one's life and to pass on to future generations. Beautiful!

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Jamie Whittaker thank you for your vote! 
I can't wait for your niece and you to use this platform to collect your memories and engage in activities inspired by your stories. 

Photo of Marsha Hurst
Team

Jess, 
Yes, Eddie Gonzalez at Story Corps is great.  We love working with him, and the Legacy Project is all about partnerships and collaboration.
I wanted to share with you this amazing work that is being done by a former student of mine, Claytie Mason http://www.claytiemason.com/#!presently/cee5.  Claytie was a theatre MFA student at Columbia when she took the "Narratives of Death, Living and Caring at the End of Life" course I teach.  She was very interested in how children experience serious illness and imagine death.  The production she created, "The Big White Door," was just beautiful, crafted from qualitative interviews with parents, clinicians, and conversations with kids.  I just wish we could produce "The Big White Door" for clinicians and carers in every setting in which children face illness and death.

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Marsha Hurst Thank you for telling me about Claytie! What an amazing project. I recently contacted Claytie because I think her project would be an amazing idea and inspiration for a creative storytelling media and or activity. Plus, she used qualitative research to craft the production- I must learn from her! Similarly, for a final proposal for the arts in education program at Harvard Graduate School of Education, I proposed incorporating qualitative research and interviews to continue the Illuminations Program, which is a rotating art exhibit housed in the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, designed to enhance our environment of care and reflect the diversity of the communities we serve. Instead of simply featuring artworks by regional and national artists, I proposed that the art gallery become a collaborative gallery in which artworks are themed and created according to patient's imaginations or dreams. In this way, artists are encouraged to interview and get to know patients to create pieces that are inspired by the patients themselves. 

Photo of D'vorah
Team

Hi Jess, 
This is such a wonderful idea! Helping people remember and share their stories can bring incredible healing and sense of connection, especially at the end of life. Some questions: (a.) How might these tools be made available to children/families/elders who'd like to participate but don't have access to the technology due to economics, lack of computer literacy, etc. (b.) Would this project need to be presented to different cultural or religious groups in different ways?    I'm looking forward to seeing the next step!

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

@D'vorah Thank you for your comment! To answer your questions... 
a) I recently updated the images with a presentation to address this question! However, I think it needs a more detailed answer needs to be added as well. Thank you so much for bringing to light this important factor. If children/families/elders do not have access to technology, I see two different solutions: First, I am hoping that public target places (schools, hospitals or community centers) can provide with tools and user assistance for everyone to engage in Once Upon a Time. Secondly, if the children/family/elders want to do the activity at home, I hope to provide a personalized card guideline (see presentation pg 14) to take home where they can use or get ideas on how to make storytelling into a fun and memorable family activity. It would be something like a take-home kit.
b) I do believe that this project must take into consideration the different cultural or religious groups. Do you think the personalized cards can be a way to address this? Perhaps specific types of questions can be asked when the get to know you questions are sent in order to make a personalized card. Please let me know your thoughts! 

Photo of Marsha Hurst
Team

Hi Shane,
This project really resonates with me right now.  I am taking care of my grandchildren this week in a house by a lake that holds lots of memories.  They love hearing about the family members who spent summers here before they were born, about old friends on the lake, and about how their own parents played as children.  They also are very interested in when relatives lived and how they died, in a kind of approach/avoidance way.  They would love an app that allowed them to create stories using family pictures and their own art work.  I wonder if there is some way you could tie this into a Story Corp type element (or work with Story Corps Legacy project) that would help children interview family members and ask questions about how they lived and how they died.  This active involvement really enables children to connect with the life cycle as a natural part of family life.

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Hello Marsha Hurst !

Thank you for this lovely note. Your experience and observations resonate with me as well, and I can't wait to start launching this project/homework to a few students that I am working with this summer. Please share your own stories on this platform so that I can start documenting a few stories and perhaps collaborate with you and your family on creating the stories into something more. 

I am also so glad that you mention Story Corp! I actually connected with Eddie Gonzalez who works at storyCorps early on! I have incorporated their app into the user map experience and will be handing out an instruction sheet on how to download and use story corps when students interview their grandparents/family members. 

I agree that this activity will indeed enable children to connect and learn about the life cycle as a natural part of family cycle, and I hope that such important lessons can be collaborated into school agendas and assignments! 

Photo of Shane Zhao
Team

Jess, we're excited to see how you'll prototype Once Upon a Time with the elementary students at the start-up! It'll be great to see how kids will translate their family history into stories. One piece of feedback that we got on this idea was that the stories don't necessarily have to be fictional fairy tales — perhaps some of the stories can be true accounts of memories from loved ones. This might be a question to answer as you test out the type of content that kids will resonate with the most. 

Also, in addition to the mockups of the website it'll also be helpful to dive deeper into what the entire user journey will look like and feel like for kids. The user experience map is just one way to do that. Looking forward to how this idea will progress in the next few weeks!

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

@Shane Zhao Thank you so much for the feedback! And yes, I agree and plan on not limiting the stories to be fictional fairytales- this would be one way/idea to turn one's collection of memories and stories into more. I am excited the different kinds of projects kids come up with once I start prototyping the activity! 

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Welcome to the refinement phase Jess! Here are some key questions and milestones we encourage from all ideas in the Refinement:

1. How might this idea address the unique needs of the target audience you're designing for?
2. Clearly summarize the value offering of your idea in 1-2 sentences
3. Communicate your idea in a visual way with user experience maps http://ideo.pn/UX_Map
4. Identify assumptions that need to be answered in order to validate your value offering: http://bit.ly/1Oi8ZHu
5. Collect feedback from potential partners and users to answer the assumptions you’ve identified.

Lastly, here's a useful tip: When you update the content of your post, it'd be helpful to indicate this in your idea title by adding an extension. For example, you can add the extension " - Update: Experience Maps 07/12" to you idea title. This will be a good way to keep people informed about how your idea is progressing!

Photo of Morgan Meinel
Team

 Jess, thank you for your contribution to the ideas phase! This is such a remarkable and lovely idea. 

On our Palliative Care Unit at Mount Sinai, our team often uses legacy work and shared projects between children and their loved ones who are dying - to assist in the grieving process of that child. Often, our patients and their children are very grateful to have something tangible (that they've created together) to have and reflect on - especially after their loved one dies. 

As a young child, I remember reading many fairy tales and stories and imagining my loved ones, family, friends, secret crush, as the fictional characters and would find great meaning and joy in that! It would contribute to my wellbeing in very profound ways. So, the idea of utilizing the real life stories of our loved ones and portraying them in story books, let along with beautiful and creative illustration, would be such a wonderful and meaningful way to remember them and carry the spirit and essence of their life on. 

Thank you for your contribution! :) 

Photo of Shane Zhao
Team

Well said Morgan:) Jess, I love the simplicity and beauty of this idea! Have your read Alyssa Frances Thompson 's post in the Inspiration phase of this challenge? Involving Children and this post about StoryCorps? StoryCorps Legacy - A Model for Integrating StoryCorps Interviews within Hospice and Palliative Care 

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Shane Zhao Thank you so much for sharing the two contacts! Alyssa and Eddie's stories and backgrounds resonated with my own experiences with teaching and overcoming loss through storytelling. I reached out to Alyssa and Eddie - I hope that as a team we can collaborate on a project. 
I am so thankful and thrilled to find people who can share the same interests and ideas on OpenIdeo!  

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

 Thank you Morgan Meinel ! I am very touched by the work your team does with children at Palliative Care Unit. In fact, I would love to work with a team at Palliative Care Unit on a project to create impactful experiences for the children who are experiencing loss of a loved one. I also reached out to Eddie Gonzalez and his project on StoryCorps Legacy - A Model for Integrating StoryCorps Interviews within Hospice and Palliative Care . 

Thank you also for sharing your story about imagining loved ones as fictional characters! I did the same when reading my favorite tall tales. As someone who has aging loved ones, I am also channeling my fears of loss into the creation of beautiful and everlasting stories. My grandmother recently shared her life stories growing up through the Korean War, losing family members, husband, and then starting all over in as an immigrant in the United States with her three children. It is so humbling to listen to the stories and adventures our beloved grandparents went through to bring us here today :) 

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Morgan Meinel !
Please give me feedback on this wire framing of a website platform:
https://d3gxp3iknbs7bs.cloudfront.net/attachments/74b8c32a-bc89-4c47-a55c-776cf9473080.pdf

for Update 7/01/2016- Once upon a Time 

Photo of Morgan Meinel
Team

Jess Paik - This looks wonderful! I love the layout and framing of your idea. It appears very user friendly and easy to navigate. Do you have this framework in English translation by any chance? Thanks so much! :)

Photo of Gary Skeete
Team

 Yes but just created within this construct a list of memories photographs and ideas that could lead into stories told by children be memory we collect aspect of memory research and allocation of designing a visual reference to documentation the aspect of creating audio memories visual memories video  and having pictoral and holographic representations of relatives who have passed on to produce a quick scenario for research into the details of storytelling 

Photo of Doug Wilson
Team

I feel inspired! Such a helpful and beautiful idea! Not everyone has elders who can just spin stories children. I feel so thankful for those stories from my parents and grandparents, and wish you every success in helping this become more available so more children can have a better sense for who they are.

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

I love the story and illustration you posted Jess!  Great example of what you are proposing here!
Also, wow - collaborating with Story corps sounds great!  Will people be guided to go to their app first to tell the stories?  How will the flow of information and stories go?

Can people illustrate their own stories or is the plan to gather audio, or written stories, and then to have others do the visuals?

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Bettina Fliegel Hello! 
I envision people using the sotrycorp app as a tool for recording and archiving the stories and also the processes of collecting and interacting with people. Submitted stories/interviews on story crops are archived, and so this would also be a great resource. Once the collection or research step with storycorp is complete, then the initiator can collaborate with artists,designers, editors and more to customize a product that fulfills the vision. However, the initiator and those involved in the story making process will be the main creators. Assistance will only be available as an option to the initiators, but the aim will be to guide and encourage families, friends, and loved ones to get their hands dirty with creative media! For example, I remember that when we spoke you mentioned a great idea: "Why not let the kids draw the stories out?" - Bettina Fliegel  . I thought this to be a great idea and way to empower the youth in expressing their perspectives and sharing their worlds, visions. 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Jess.
How are the mock ups coming along for the website?
I do really like the idea of kids drawing their stories!  Glad you liked it as well.  What about older youth who might want to make a video, or animation to go with their story?

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Bettina Fliegel I am currently making mock up html and css sheets on Dreamweaver! It should be launched onto a host site soon as a mock test soon :) I am hoping to connect this online platform/idea to a summer program that I will be working for briefly. Perhaps some kids can get involved to do some drawings. As for older youths, I am open to accept and upload all types of mediums to this website and also perhaps organize stories into three major media: books/illustrations, videos/animations, finally recordings/written texts, and finally crafts/plays. Sort of like a multi-media platform for creative story-telling. What do you think about this organization? 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Great!  Do you have any quick handwritten web page sketch mock ups you can share to get feedback here? 

I love the idea of kids getting involved as you develop the site and to do drawings.

re: Organization - I like your idea.  (What do you mean by crafts?)  Maybe cross reference stories in some way?  By media type and by something related to content?  Or if it is kids maybe by age group?  Kids might enjoy reading stories written by other kids their age. (or videos etc.)

Did you have a look at the Mother Tongue Book Project links?  Maybe they have some stories about elders?

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Thank you Bettina Fliegel for the feedback and comments! 
The new image I added to this post is a web page mock-up. I am recreating the piece as a html/css coded page so that it can potentially be hosted to a website. I will start sharing more ideas about how the website will function this week! 
By crafts: I was imagining another way/medium for storytelling- for example, a small puppet show or simply using evocative objects as reminders to a great story. Similar to how your glass jar can be that evocative object where stories and memories come from. 
And just as you imagined and expressed in this comment, I was thinking of organizing first by age category: Children, in-between and elders. Then under these categories by different story mediums by content (illustrations, books, videos, crafts, objects and so on). What do you think? 

I also envision having a specific illustration portraying the organization of this diverse platform--to be posted shortly! I will most likely create some sort of collage of images and sketches to communicate this! :) 

I also did have a look at the Mother Tongue Book Project. It was amazing! Thank you so much for sharing this. I could not find any records of documented stories...would you suggest that I reach out about this? 

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

https://d3gxp3iknbs7bs.cloudfront.net/attachments/74b8c32a-bc89-4c47-a55c-776cf9473080.pdf

Check out the website wire framing! Please send over your feedback! :) 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Jess,
Can you add the images to the text above?  Or link the PDF directly to the text and write Update 7/1/16 - wireframes - and then link it there?  I think it will be easier for everyone to find it there.  Or indicate the Update - What the update is - and that there is a file linked below?  

I like it.  I am not clear from the wireframes how Storycorp fits into your website though.

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Congrats on this being today's Featured Contribution!

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Thank you so much for this! I am very excited to start this project in the near future! Currently collecting some great stories :) 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Jess.  
Great idea for preserving memories and stories for families!  I am curious about your idea to make them into fairy tales.  Is the idea to preserve memories and to document stories about elders, or to document the elders' stories and remembrances from their earlier lives?  Both?

 I had a cool experience years ago in regards to families and stories.  My extended family was together after the funeral for a cousin who died suddenly, leaving a wife and young child.  As is the ritual everyone returned to his family's home after the service.  Standing in the crowded kitchen I heard my other cousin's 7 year old daughter say something about my grandmother.  She remarked, "I know, Grandma Bess would drink from a jar", as she asked her dad to help her find a cup.  (It seems the cups were all in use.)  She had never met my grandmother.  My grandmother used to drink out of jars when she visited at her daughter's homes - "Why dirty a perfectly clean cup/glass?"  It is one of those funny family things that my mother used to mention, even while my grandmother was living as she told her it was ok to dirty one of our cups.  It was so odd and heart warming to hear my cousin's 7 year old repeat this.   I had my back to them.  I remember turning around thinking that my cousin is telling his kids the same stories about our grandparents that my family is re-telling.  What a lovely moment particularly at a very sad time. The story brought my grandparents right into the room.  These are the things I love to recall and share - all the things that make the people we love unique to us.   
Sometimes when I hear the younger generation mentioning my grandparents I need to take pause because it feels like they knew them, which they did not.  They know "of them" through the stories they hear, photos, and objects that we have saved from their lives.  Interesting also is that they hear stories directly and indirectly as we share between ourselves, and also with others that we meet along the way.  Also I have observed that sometimes stories change in the telling over time, and depending on who is doing the telling.  This has definitely come up within my extended family.  I wonder if getting to the truth is important, or might at times potentially be harmful.

What are your thoughts on fairy tales vs. other types of narrative?  Some fairy tales are dark and scary.   Do children need to change stories to make them more appealing, or to emphasize what they value?  It  might be interesting to see what children of different ages gravitate towards in terms of genre when writing their stories.

Congrats on your very cool project!  I am excited to see how it develops going forward!

(I am curious when you mention that millennial children are disconnected from their heritage and history. Is this an observation, or have studies been done specific to this generation?)

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Hello Bettina Fliegel ! Thank you so much for sharing your lovely story. Your story and questions certainly made me consider important details. 

To answer the first question: Is the idea to preserve memories and to document stories about elders, or to document the elders' stories and remembrances from their earlier lives? Both?

I initially imagined participants to document and preserve the current and past stories of elders within their circle of families or friends. So this idea would be more about documenting elders' stories instead of documenting about elders in general. However, I believe that by collecting and creating unique stories from individual elders empower their roles as important 'key-holders' into seeing the many different perspectives of history within all communities. 

What are your thoughts on fairy tales vs. other types of narrative?
Yes, I agree that some fairy tales/fables are dark and scary! 
However, I am hoping such stories will share important messages about topics that are not openly talked about, such as death- Alyssa Frances Thompson - or war. I do not think children need to change the stories to be more appealing. Some children may want to create a book or documentation of some sort that is more real, and there is no criteria or limitation to this. My hopes are to make sure such stories are passed down like a family heirloom. However, the point about reimagining collected stories into unique fables or fairy tales is because young children gravitate towards such genres. And instead of resorting to popular fairy tales such as Cinderella, I hope that children can find their own grandmother or father to be that inspirational story or figure. More than making stories appealing, my goal is to bridge the two worlds between children and adults. 
And yes I agree on taking this project to children of different age ranges! I am curious to see the different outcomes. 

millennial children: I misused this term and edited it in the body of my text. I was trying to express how the majority of generations born during the late 20th century and beyond have become somewhat obsessed with socializing through media and gaining fame through 'likes'  or 'followers'. It is common to witness, and I admit to having been a part of, friends and family gathering over coffee or a meal only to be immersed in their phones or tablets. I tried to generalize the issue by stating that many millennial children, including myself, are somewhat disconnected from family stories and conversations. 

Thank you again! I would love to continue this conversation :) 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Thanks for adding me to the team!

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Hello OpenIDEO  !


Please give me feedback on this wire framing:
https://d3gxp3iknbs7bs.cloudfront.net/attachments/74b8c32a-bc89-4c47-a55c-776cf9473080.pdf
for Update 7/01/2016- Once upon a Time 

Photo of Bettina Fliegel
Team

Hi Jess.
Did you see this inspiration post?  I think you will enjoy it.
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/end-of-life/research/beginning-to-comprehend-your-impact-on-the-world

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Bettina Fliegel 
Hello! Thank you for this reference! I did very much enjoy this video, and it is very close to what I imagined for potential projects to take place with Once Upon a Time. I plan on adding my grandmother's photos as an addition to the post this week. The subject in this video had so many great photos- perhaps some sort of book can be produced! 

Photo of Sherri McElroy
Team

I love the idea of translating stories with a narrative that may have meaning for a wider audience. I have written a children's book about loss and am working with a pro-Bono illustrator, and have found it difficult to expect work to be completed in a timely manner. I would like to hire an illustrator, but don't have funding for illustration. Are you hoping to have illustrators donate their time? 

Photo of Jess Paik
Team

Sherri McElroy , 
great to hear from you! I am an artist/illustrator myself. 
When this project goes into action I plan on working with children and family to develop scenes, characters and a storyboard. And yes, I am hoping to have illustrators donate their time and I also know a few close friends who are great illustrators as well! I will also probably illustrate and be a part of the making process.