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upROSE: Understanding and Promoting Resilience in Families with Young Children

upROSE is a dynamic app to drive early childhood practitioners' identification of family strengths, hope, and resilience.

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Updates: How has your idea changed or evolved throughout the Prize? What updates have you made to this submission? (1500 characters)

Feedback, discussion with mentors, and utilization of other resources from IDEO have significantly improved and deepened our original concept of upROSE.

We have added a storyboard to better explain how end users will interact with the app in a home setting. We are working on adding information to our submission about the significance of upROSE for data collection and measurement that validates the scales we plan to test. And we are working to be more mindful about how we talk about upROSE as a game-changer for home visitors, ensuring that we acknowledge the significant, positive impact home visitors are already having for families while proposing that the need for more practical tools like upROSE is an impediment for taking strengths-based research to practice on a large scale.

During discussions with partners working in home visiting, we are learning that by conducting assessments and discussing the results with parents very early during service delivery, families are more likely to be engaged. Based on this feedback, we will develop materials for home visitors to facilitate conversations about the tools in upROSE. Families will have immediate feedback about their profile and leave the first meetings with a tangible depiction of their strengths.

A focus on hope and resilience resonated with many commenters on the IDEO platform who work across the lifespan. We will continue to develop relationships with these new-found partners who use hope and resilience strategies in their work with individuals and families.

Commenters also underscored the need to explore the context surroundings of potential users of upROSE by looking at identifies, beliefs, and capabilities. We will incorporate HCD and complexity methods throughout prototyping and piloting. We are exploring SenseMaker http://cognitive-edge.com/sensemaker as a tool to gather experiences of individuals and allow them to make meaning of their own experiences. A tool such as SenseMaker would greatly expand the reach beyond small focus groups.

We have had several enlightening discussions with mentors, team members, and commenters on our submission around the ideas of cultural sensitivity and systemic inequalities. Our initial approach was primarily based at the individual level - and did not necessarily consider intersections of class, race, culture or other structural realities. We believe the ongoing development of the application, and the information collected through its use will provide a unique opportunity to better understand how systemic inequalities affect the lives of families and children.

The IDEO Challenge has also highlighted the importance that the tool grow beyond measurements on a scale. Scores measure only one dimension and do not define a person.

Additionally, several commenters were outside the US, suggesting a universal convergence around hope and resilience.

To incorporate these aspects into the project requires:

*Ongoing measurement analyses of the scales across diverse groups (race/ethnicity, gender, community, etc.) to see if similar or different constructs are captured across those groups. Analysis and adjustment would continue throughout the life of upROSE, illustrating the need for additional staff and resources for maintenance.

*Qualitative data collection to better understand people's conceptualizations of constructs like hope and resiliency. Value and belief systems will affect the way the tool is received by the very people we are trying to help.

*Tool design that accommodates the fluid nature of the measurement scales. User interface should allow for adding and subtracting of measurement scales as we learn more.

*Cultivation of relationships and exploration of international partnerships to work toward global scalability.

Name or Organization

The Center for Public Partnerships and Research (CPPR) at the University of Kansas.

We provide backbone support for early childhood initiatives by partnering with state and local agencies and nonprofits in several states, including Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Geography

CPPR is located in Lawrence, Kansas at the main campus of the University of Kansas.

What is your stage of development?

  • Advanced Innovator with 3 to 10+ years of experience in ECD

Type

  • University

What is the stage of your proposal?

  • Research & Early Testing: I am exploring my idea, gathering the inspiration and information I need to test it with real users.

Describe how your solution could be a game-changer for your selected Opportunity Area (600 characters)

Home visiting – a service that meets families where they are (literally and figuratively) - is an intervention that works. Research proves it, and there’s bipartisan support. Home visitors are making a difference, but what if we could amplify what works by providing a visual depiction of how strong families are from the moment a home visitor walks in the door? What if there was a tool that helped show parents their resilience skills using real data and offered resources to help leverage those skills? Would this enhancement make a difference for how families view and engage in services?

Select an Innovation Target

  • Platform: Creating a community or market that facilitates interaction between users and resources.

Tell us more about your innovation (1500 characters)

UpROSE is a mobile app and website offering a suite of resources, tools, and assessments that provide families with individualized Resilience Profiles. These profiles and tools support home visiting models using a two-generation approach to address risk characteristics. Home visitors use upROSE to amplify strengths-based approaches by: 1) quickly understanding a parent’s past experiences using the ACEs questionnaire (an indicator of Adverse Childhood Experiences such as emotional or physical abuse), 2) developing human-centered interventions with resilience as a change-making tool, and 3) empowering individuals and families to understand their ACEs score and their Resilience Profile in tandem to develop goals for how they parent. We believe upROSE will give home visitors critical information to build on families’ strengths from Day One, and that engaging with the tool will help parents see their own strengths as just as important and tangible as their challenges. This will ultimately improve engagement and retention in services, a common challenge in home visiting.

In addition to acting as a game-changing practice tool for home visitors, upROSE gathers valuable data to further the field of strength-based early childhood services. While much has been made of the efficacy of resilience, hope, and growth mindset in recent years, research on these topics is still in its infancy. UpROSE will collect the data necessary to develop, test, and use new, strength-based interventions.

What problem are you aiming to solve? (3 sentences)

Adverse childhood experiences (such as abuse, neglect, parental conflict, or other kinds of household dysfunction) have a long-lasting impact on individuals, and can be transferred from one generation to the next. upROSE may provide a lever in breaking the cycle by focusing on strengths, shifting mindsets, and using hope and resilience strategies to envision a brighter future with concrete pathways to get there. Family service delivery needs more tools that use a strengths-based approach.

Explain your idea (5000 characters)

UpROSE is an innovative, family-centered app aimed at improving child well-being. Human Centered Design (HCD) is critical for success. We will work in phases to develop the upROSE platform using the HCD framework--Inspiration, Ideation, and Implementation.

PHASE I - Inspiration. We will conduct listening sessions, focus groups and explore other complexity facilitation methods to explore upROSE from the inside out and learn how home visitors and families understand the concepts in upROSE and how they would engage with the tool. We will learn more about current practice approaches, including how deficits and strengths are defined and what ignites positive relationships with families. Just as critical as speaking with home visitors will be engaging with families of young children, especially those who would qualify for home visiting services due to risk characteristics. We want to understand directly from families what gets them excited about services and makes them feel confident that they can influence their child’s future?

The experiences of home visitors and the families they serve will influence the process of testing and developing assessments that measure hope, mindset, strengths, and protective factors. We will rely on these stakeholders to tell us what we've missed and to identify opportunities we have yet to explore. We will draw from our current cross-state partners to identify home visitors with a history of innovation and early adoption and families who are willing to share their experiences about how they might use an app like upROSE or if it has relevance for them at all. If not, we will iterate until we have a set of concepts, needs, and possibilities that resonates with families and home visitors.

PHASE II - Ideation. The ideation phase will have two distinct processes. First, we will assess existing tools and measures from our literature reviews and from contributors to our idea to determine whether or not they fit our understanding of end user needs and goals (as gleaned during the Inspiration phase). These are the tools which will shine a light on a family’s resilience, hope, mindset, and protective factors, as well as ACEs. With input from home visitors, we will determine whether these assessments ask the right questions and measure the human characteristics we hope to highlight. If they don’t, we will adapt, refine, and develop new tools and partner with others to ensure that the tools are culturally relevant and aligned with strengths.

Second, we will begin to build a prototype of upROSE. Through the upROSE website and app, practitioners will access a variety of resilience tools, assessments, and dashboards that generate family Resilience Profiles. We envision a web-based application that home visitors, and eventually other family support professionals, can easily use on a mobile tablet during visits. As these two ideation processes unfold, we will invite partners to test the platform, while we modify and enhance the application. The iterative nature of this phase will continue until we have identified a prototype that addresses the input received. Several mock-ups displaying the first design of the upROSE user interface are attached to this section. Additionally, we developed and attached a storyboard to show a visual depiction of how upROSE could be used during a home visit with a family.

PHASE III - Implementation. Once we have a functioning prototype, we will develop an implementation plan with pilot sites that includes training and technical assistance for the following: 1) how to use strengths and resilience-based approaches in early childhood service delivery, 2) how to use the app, and 3) best practices for collecting and using data. This initial implementation phase offers an opportunity to scale the system strategically and allows for us to anticipate needed tweaks and enhancements likely to surface when the application becomes widespread. Our experience with scaling two other applications (i.e., DAISEY and IRIS) will inform this initial implementation strategy.

While we have described the potential reach of this product in other sections, we realize that full, large-scale implementation will come in the future beyond this initial implementation phase.

Taking this stage-based approach provides us with the structure to remain flexible to the needs of the end users, and open to ideas beyond our own. We will consider our idea successful and achieving its purpose if, through this process, upROSE is adopted and embraced.

Who benefits? (1500 characters)

Positive relationships between families and service providers are critical to make a difference for people in need, and upROSE helps strengthen these relationships, leading to better outcomes and forging pathways of hope and resilience. UpROSE will benefit three groups close to our mission – home visitors, parents of young children, and ultimately children ages 0-3. While families in need may receive services from many different practice fields (e.g., healthcare, mental health, child welfare, child care, early childhood home visiting), upROSE will initially be piloted with families receiving voluntary early childhood home visiting.

For over a decade, CPPR has supported innovation and research within early childhood home visiting programs. We count home visitors and other practitioners among our closest and most important colleagues. We also have a shared value in family – we are mothers and fathers, and aunts and uncles (no grandparents yet!), and people who seek to leave this world a better place than we found it for children and families. We know firsthand that every family is complex, that risk is not static, but rather a stage we all go through as life presents challenges. Every family is valuable and deserves respect and support. It’s core to our work that families and those providing support to them benefit from our efforts. These working relationships have led to similar work, like upROSE, building and implementing apps and online learning platforms.

What kind of impact will your idea have? (1500 characters)

The current state of early childhood service provision in America often requires families to qualify for services based on risk factors and characteristics. This systemic restraint sets the stage for deficits-based approaches. Home visitors who value and are naturally inclined to work from a strengths-based perspective face an uphill battle to flip the script if deficits are their starting point. Moreover, the tools home visitors have at their disposal are not doing enough to help them in this regard. Some may even work against them. UpROSE will catalyze immediate illumination of family strengths, providing home visitors with tools and resources to uncover family social supports, sources of hope, and resiliency.
 
What if we developed tools which honored home visitors’ natural proclivities toward a strengths approach? What could be achieved with more holistic approaches that inspire and give confidence to identify alternate pathways toward family’s goals? What if families with young children had concrete tools and resources for building on the positive so that they can grow and thrive? Evidence supports flipping the script in this way. Taking a positive, strength-based approach has been shown to improve social networks, enhance well-being, and increase retention. This approach empowers families to cope with adversity and is associated with academic success and life satisfaction. Despite its promise, strengths-based approaches are not widespread in early childhood.

How does or how could your idea impact low-income children? (1500 characters)

UpRose predominantly benefits low-income children because they are a target population of evidence-based home visiting: nearly three-quarters (74%) of the 160,000 children and families served in 2016 lived below 100% of the Federal Poverty threshold. Studies have shown that home visiting achieves the best gains when serving low-income families. Reaching low income children is so critical that federal investments in evidence-based home visiting require examining multiple socio-ecological levels to ensure programs reach families most in need. At the community level, federal home visiting programs are currently serving families in 893 counties across the country. The process to determine these communities required state applicants to examine all communities within a state and identify those most at risk who could benefit most from home visiting. As a result of these needs assessments, a quarter of all U.S. counties implement the federal home visiting program.

Innovation: What makes your concept innovative? (5000 characters)

For this early childhood challenge, we bring with us both a disruptive mindset, and the experience and resources to take the latest and most innovative research to practice. We aim to build upon an approach that we already know works, and through HCD, make that approach the most widespread and effective strategy employed in the field. Over and over again, we've witnessed home visitor, parent, and child success as families move toward change using a strengths-based frame. Given that promise of success, we believe we owe it to our colleagues and the families they serve, to equip them with accessible tools and a plethora of resources to truly move the needle both individually and system-wide. The disruption, then, happens at the nexus of technology at-the-finger-tips, and actionable data and insight gleaned from fast-growing adoption of that same technological tool.

For some, disruption may mean upROSE will be the catalyst for making a wide left turn, significantly changing how they think, behave, learn, and go about their day-to-day interactions with families. For others, upROSE is simply the tool they've been waiting for all along to enable them to work faster, better, and with more hope for the futures of the families they serve.

Significantly, the data produced through widespread use of upROSE will provide researchers the opportunity to establish the validity and reliability of resilience assessments for the field, and develop an evidence base on the co-occurrence of ACEs and resilience to better understand how individuals overcome adversity and build resilience.

upROSE will be the first of its kind and is poised to be a game-changer for family support professionals everywhere. As such, upROSE will be what Harvard Business Review calls a “catalytic innovation,” by "approaching social-sector problems in a fundamentally new way and creating scalable, sustainable, systems-changing solutions."

Clayton M. Christensen, Heiner Baumann, Rudy Ruggles, Thomas M. Sadtler. "Disruptive Innovation for Social Change." Harvard Business Review. N.p., 31 July 2014. Web. 14 Feb. 2018.

Scale: Describe how your idea could reach a significant number of end-users. (1500 characters)

Home visiting is increasingly acting as an important access point to families of young children, particularly those who would otherwise be difficult to reach. The federal government invested considerable funding to expand evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs in the last decade. Over the past 5 years alone, 3.3 million home visits occurred. While this figure certainly is impressive, it may actually under-represent the complete reach and scale of home visiting, as many states have invested heavily on their own, in addition to federal initiatives. While our idea has a market potential to reach hundreds of thousands of service providers and families with young children, there are two barriers to scaling we have considered.

First, scaling out toward market saturation would require us to build relationships with states outside our current portfolio of partners. We currently provide statewide data systems and implementation support for four states receiving federal home visiting funds with a fifth state likely to join this year. These state partnerships provide a model for further scaling.

Second, scaling deep--producing a robust, high-quality, high-demand product--is reliant on significant financial support for sustainability. We have, however, considerable experience taking ideas to scale--including three other technological innovations--using limited financial resources by inspiring a shared vision among partners.

Feasibility: Where are you with understanding the feasibility of your idea? Describe what you’ve done so far and your plans. (3000 characters)

CPPR has a cross-disciplinary staff of 60 social workers, psychologists, educators, and sociologists devoted to navigating social change efforts. Staff specialize in three areas of expertise: 1) social innovation, 2) data science, and 3) research and evaluation. Many within CPPR view upROSE as an amalgam of all these areas of expertise, and as such, upROSE has generated widespread support and excitement within CPPR including individuals at the director level, senior staff level, and junior staff level with capacity to devote to this idea. The prospective team to carry out the development of upROSE will draw on these areas of expertise and our diverse disciplinary and professional backgrounds.

In addition to the considerable strengths of our own staff, we currently partner with two information technology organizations to support software programming and engineering, system architecture, database administration, operational support of hardware and software, and quality assurance testing. The team CPPR dedicates to upROSE will be responsible for defining user expectations and business cases to technology partners, completing user acceptance testing of application and system iterations, and interfacing with end users to train and implement.

In addition to our staff and technical capabilities, we have also already engaged one focus group of early childhood service providers and program leaders to provide preliminary feedback and generate further inspiration. This group was made up of a range of child maltreatment prevention professionals, including direct service staff, researchers, technical assistance coordinators, and leadership. Group members provided us with thoughtful feedback which has already shaped our understanding of upROSE’s potential. Among the questions they raised was how we would frame resilience and protective factors in a way that wouldn’t be perceived by end-users as simply the opposite of risk factors. We were most struck by their response when we asked them about how they approach early childhood work from a strengths-perspective. Their answer was simple, but we feel it provides the strongest case for our idea: “We say we’re strengths-based, but we’re really not.” They told us that service providers want a strengths-based approach, and in fact many learned about the perspective in college. Unfortunately, in practices, the tools and resources they have available are often focused on deficits. This insight drives us to pursue upROSE, and gives us confidence that this tool will meet an important need in early childhood service provision.

Additionally, we met with a regional child and family-serving organization in the midwest that has echoed the need for concrete tools to allow staff to do strengths-based practice - not just at a theoretical level, but by fundamentally changing interactions with children and families.

Business Viability: How viable is your business model? (5000 characters)

The upROSE business model is built on 4 S’s: Seed, Sell, Scale, and Sustain. We’re seeking seed money to support the facilitation of Human Centered Design approaches, and to support tech costs for initial application development. This ensures that no partner seeking to use upROSE has to shoulder start-up costs. The truth is, although we haven’t started development of the application yet, we’ve noticed that as we talk about the idea to home visiting and family support organizations, it seems to sell itself. CPPR provides professional development and organizational mindset shift work around a strengths-based model, and engagement around hope and resilience, to a variety of early childhood and maternal and child health partners including home visiting programs. During national conference presentations and one-on-one conversations, when we discuss hope and resilience, we hear the need for and interest in an application like upROSE.

To support the scaling and sustainability of upROSE, we want to find a costing model that covers costs and allows room for updates and enhancements while keeping the cost reasonable for non-profit organizations and state agencies. We intend to pursue foundation funding as one option. Partnering with a foundation would allow us to offer and implement upROSE for large and very small organizations at a cost they could bear and sustain. If (or while) ongoing foundation support is not an option, we are committed to providing upROSE at a cost that is sustainable for the partner, while ensuring we can provide sufficient staffing to support implementation best practices. As upROSE is implemented with more and more partners, we will spread ongoing maintenance, upgrade, and technical costs among all partners, reducing the individual cost for each.

We are committed to providing a high level of implementation support for any organization wanting to use the app. As a tool to support best practice, upROSE will only be successful if users are involved in the implementation process, understand the value add of upROSE to their work, are sufficiently trained to use the tool, and are supported with adequate and ongoing technical assistance. Initial costs for implementing upROSE at any organization will include staff time to support implementation best practices and user training. Ongoing or maintenance costs for an organization post-implementation should be reduced, and will generally be limited to supporting the hard costs of the application (server hosting, application maintenance and upgrades, etc.) and some ongoing training and technical assistance support.

Based on our experience developing, selling, scaling, and sustaining other applications (i.e. DAISEY http://daiseysolutions.org, a shared measurement application used in single-community collective impact projects as well as large-scale, statewide initiatives; and IRIS http://connectwithiris.org, a community referral communication tool) we are confident in the viability of the business model we’ve described. We will apply lessons we’ve learned developing our business model for our other applications to our approach with upROSE. Unforeseen factors that may impact this business model will likely come to light as we conduct additional HCD activities, begin application development, and think through the details of implementation with partners.

Based on our experience conceptualizing, building, and implementing DAISEY and IRIS, we know there will be bumps in the road and things that force us to pause, evaluate, and pivot. On the design and development side, we will need a tech partner who understands the vision of the app and who is committed to making upROSE the best it can be for users while keeping costs reasonable. This will require creative problem solving and a real partnership. On the implementation side, data governance and client consent questions are likely to come up. Implementation will also look different depending on the type of organization and the culture of the organization- whether staff embrace technology to support their work, whether leadership buys-in to the focus on hope and resilience and potentially a new way of doing business. All of these factors may impact our business model. Our challenge will be to continue mapping them out,strategize as best we can, and adapt as necessary. We embrace a fail forward approach. We’re willing to take risks and try things, amplify what works and dampen or pivot away from what doesn’t.

We are excited to explore this business model using the Value Proposition Canvas and Business Model Canvas tools. We are confident these tools will help us refine our model and identify missing connections or orphan elements. We know securing foundation funding can be difficult without a good business model. We intend to use these tools to help us articulate and strengthen our business model.

HCD: How have you used human centered design to build or refine your concept? (5000 characters)

We are committed to ensuring that a Human Centered Design (HCD) approach is woven throughout all phases and processes of our work. The HCD framework and design thinking in general resonate with us, and as discussed in the “Explain Your Idea” section of this proposal, we will use the Exploration, Ideation, and Implementation phases as our signposts for understanding which complex social space we are in at a given time. When we are in need of direction, experiencing barriers, or downright stuck, we will fall back on HCD for guidance and forward progress. Simply put, HCD will provide the foundation on which our success stands.

We have already taken a number of actions to establish our commitment to HCD.
First, we have remained active with the OPEN-IDEO community providing comments and feedback on our proposal’s message board. One comment specifically struck and challenged us on the notion that concepts like hope, resiliency, and mindset could have vastly different connotations depending on cultural and historical contexts of the families engaged in early childhood services such as home visiting. We engaged this commenter in a session to discuss her comment in depth during which she suggested that the data collected in upROSE presents an interesting and unique opportunity to understand the meaning of these concepts on a larger scale. It becomes our responsibility to disseminate this knowledge to the broader research community and help spread diverse, non-normative ways of knowing.

Second, we recently facilitated what we called a “Moving to What Matters” inspiration session with community partners who provide critical support services to children and families in the foster care system. The purpose of this session was to inspire a shared vision and understand what success looks like from different perspectives. We relied on a facilitation technique from The Field Guide to Human Centered Design toolkit called “Sharing Inspiring Stories” to lead this session. The session included staff from all levels of this organization from frontline staff to program administrators and supervisors to organizational directors and data managers. Our facilitation team received positive feedback regarding this session and is actively pursuing conducting a similar session with families served by this organization. Please see the attached photos of the “Moving to What Matters” session.

Finally, CPPR has engaged in at least three conferences and workshops since submitting our proposal to learn more about HCD and get a general sense of peoples’ thoughts regarding upROSE. At two of these conferences, held in Washington D.C. and Lawrence, KS, CPPR staff were able to engage directly with service providers and policymakers, some of whom actually commented on our proposal message board. At another workshop, held in Buffalo, NY, two CPPR staff participated in a HCD-oriented workshop specifically focused on Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS). The objectives of this workshop were two-fold: 1) to generate an understanding of the human perspective and generate empathy for parents and children to inform the design of key features of a community system and 2) to identify, refine, and prioritize key features of a human centered ECCS system. We will rely on these staff to support HCD efforts of this project.

We also envision HCD guiding and influencing our future decision-making processes. For example, we will choose an app and software developer who is also familiar with and committed to HCD principles. Specifically, we will work to ensure upROSE is developed iteratively by identifying milestones of prototype development where the app should be put into the hands of actual end users for testing, feedback, and refinement. We’ll ensure the right people are at the right table at the right time.

Tell us more about you (3000 characters)

We have seen people overcome seemingly impossible odds. These are people who didn’t have a head start in life--who have faced poverty, systematic oppression, and adverse childhood experiences spanning generations. Some experienced maltreatment and chronic stress. Some had few, if any, positive relationships with trusted adults in their lives. For many experiencing such adversity, including ourselves, our parents, our friends, our neighbors, the natural reaction may be to fight, flee, or freeze. There is another option—freedom from these deeply ingrained responses, the ability to see what is possible, and the pathways to get there. We are committed to providing hope and resilience tools that open up a new world of possibilities for ourselves and the next generation. This is our own story AND what we want to see in the world.

When we invest in young families, we acknowledge that early childhood experiences matter. Families of young children deserve support because thoughtful intervention can prevent the transmission of adverse childhood experiences from one generation to the next. Home visiting is an exciting space for this work because early childhood presents so many opportunities - specifically the opportunity to impact multiple generations. ACEs and poverty impact both parents and their children. A universal truth is that everyone wants a better life for their child(ren). The reality is we all bring patterns of behavior with us—some we want to carry on and some we want to stop. Toxic stress experienced in the early years can be a barrier to parenting the way we want and coping with the normal challenges of raising a child.

Young children are particularly vulnerable because parental responses to toxic stress can get in the way of critical bonding between parent and child, which is fuel for infant brain development. We believe upROSE provides tools and strategies to shift mindset and give parents the confidence and ability to recognize their strengths and power to influence the life they want for their child. Uplifting parents paves the way for home visitors to help parents set achievable goals.

CPPR seeks to optimize the well-being of children, youth, and families. Solving complex social problems is tough stuff, but we are up to the challenge. We began working with large-scale early childhood initiatives in 2006 and have consistently scaled this work. We support 5 states’ early childhood initiatives including 2,500 early childhood practitioners working in 500 organizations serving 140,000 families.
 
We’re committed to practice and technological innovations in early childhood and have the portfolio to prove it. A select list of our innovations include:

Lemonade for Life - a robust training program for early childhood service providers to identify ACEs and build hope and resilience

The Protective Factors Survey

The Institute for the Advancement of Family Support Professionals

DAISEY and IRIS – web-based data applications

Do you have the people and partners you need to do what you’ve described? (600 characters)

We rely on our partnerships in pursuing our mission of optimizing the well-being of children, youth, and families. CPPR has cultivated lasting partnerships with a range of national- and state-level organizations that support families with young children. We look forward to working with partners implementing large-scale home visiting initiatives for critical early feedback and later to pilot and test prototypes. We will also to draw on a network of experts in the early childhood and prevention fields to guide us in understanding the research on resilience, including relevant assessments.

As you consider your next steps, what kinds of help could you use? Is there a type of expertise that would be most helpful? (1800 characters)

We call on all innovators who can help us make this idea a reality. As we consider our next steps, we welcome help identifying tools to build out Resilience Profiles. We’re looking for measures of resilience, hope, growth mindset, grit, or anything that could be used to amplify human strength. If you are aware of existing resources that could move this work forward, we’d love to hear from you. Maybe you have first-hand experience using these kinds of measures and can speak to how they've been used in the context of supporting families with young children. Perhaps you’re an early childhood practitioner with loads of practice wisdom; whether or not you’ve used any of these tools, and can offer suggestions on what’s worked in your practice. Maybe you’re not directly involved in early childhood but want to contribute to leaving this world a better place than you found it -- we want to hear from you. Perhaps you’ve programmed mobile apps and can offer us guidance on builds. Maybe you’re a graphic designer or visual artist and could offer recommendations for designing dashboards and communicating messages visually. We are excited to hear from all of you and hope you provide input.

Would you like mentoring support?

  • Yes

If so, what type of mentoring support do you think you need? (1200 characters)

We would like support from a mentor who will help us incorporate HCD practices into this project, and others in the future. As part of this process we would like assistance with ensuring our naming and branding of this project resonates with our target audience.

Are you willing to share your email contact information submitted on OpenIDEO with Gary Community Investments?

  • Yes, share my contact information

Mentorship: How was your idea supported? (5000 characters)

We were fortunate to be matched with not one, but two mentors, who truly helped take our idea to another level.

Our first mentor, Carol, gave us insight into ways that this idea could scale out to families and service areas beyond just home visiting. Specifically, she suggested this idea could serve early childhood education and preschool settings. We were particularly intrigued by Carol's suggestion to speak with Family Navigators of Head Start programs for feedback on how they might use a tool like upROSE.

Carol connected us with two potential partners to engage in the HCD process. We have reached out to these partners and are looking forward to exploring these opportunities. Carol also identified opportunities for upROSE to support family engagement and retention, and we appreciated her suggestion that upROSE could potentially be appropriate for families on waiting lists for service provision.

By the time we spoke with our second mentor, Gyanjith, we were a tad overwhelmed by the task ahead of improving this proposal. He was just the spark we needed, both by challenging us to improve and encouraging us that our proposal is strong and resonant. He challenged us to bring our idea to life. He told us about his own experience with another Open-IDEO Prize Challenge. He said our ‘why’ and passion for upROSE was compelling and came across well in the proposal. However, he believed the ‘what’ was disjointed throughout the proposal and that he had to read it a couple times to understand what upROSE actually is and would be. To support us, he gave us the tangible idea to create the storyboard to show ‘what’ upROSE really is. We agree unequivocally that this greatly improved our vision, direction, and proposal.

We cannot thank the mentors enough. We hope that each will take time to review our enhanced proposal and find elements of themselves and their contributions to it. Mentorship was time well spent.

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Photo of Gayanjith Premalal
Team

Really happy to see your progress and the idea that proposing is actually promising and practical as well. If you can think about how to scale and extend it to may be different regions as well, I think it will be more effective. Keep up the good work!

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

Thanks @Gayanjith Premalal. The feedback you and others have provided has been phenomenal. We have some follow-up work to do with some folks in the United Kingdom and New Zealand to explore your regional suggestion. We'll keep working!

Photo of Geoff Millener
Team

Really, really interested by your application - we are thinking about what we can do to better support early childhood success in our community, and part of our team will be in Kansas City for the US Ignite APP Summit later in March. If somebody from your team had a few minutes? We'd love to talk with y'all, in case there's an opportunity to work with Chattanooga!

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

Geoff Millener We would love to meet you and learn more about you and your interests. Haven't been to Chattanooga. Yet. Please reach out to me at jcounts@ku.edu and let us know when you are going to be in KC. If you are up for a road trip, we'd like to invite you to Lawrence to meet us and learn about our Center and upROSE. Thanks for your interest. I look forward to meeting you.

Photo of Dr. Jin Lee
Team

I would love your thoughts on
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/ecprize/open-submission/reaching-universal-developmental-screening-supporting-connections-among-parents-pediatricians-and-communities, is an app platform that
helps parents track their baby’s development at home and connects to the data to healthcare professionals and community members. We would love to partner with you to reach more kids in need!

Photo of Rebecca Gillam
Team

This is such a cool idea, Dr. Lee! We have been working on a project around developmental screening using the Ages & Stages Questionnaire in Kansas. The focus is really around systems building - working with medical practices and community partners such as home visiting to increase screening rates and ensure connection to appropriate early intervention when necessary. I could definitely see us using a tool like yours in work with families. We've developed a paper developmental screening passport that can be used to track screenings much like we track immunizations, but having it in an app like yours would make it so much more user friendly. Our website is screenearlystartstrong.org - you can find the passports and some developmental milestone postcards on the Community page under resources. What screening tools are you using? Do you work at all with Help Me Grow in California? We would love to talk more beyond IDEO with you!

Photo of Dr. Jin Lee
Team

Great! the author of ASQ is on our advisory board. We are in conversations with Help Me Grow National and other states affiliates. We would love to connect. please email asssitant@babynoggin.com with your time availabilities. Looking forward to connecting!

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Team

upROSE has significant potential to make a real difference in the lives of families and of the home visitors that support them. By identifying and working with resilience profiles it provides a context that takes account of the individual, familial and community 'strategies' that allow people to cope with and 'survive' ACEs and their impact. By focusing on hope and strengths it provides energy and willpower to engage with and change what can be changed, one step at a time. By focusing on the relationship between families and home visitors, it provides a practical and manageable way to engage with the situation and allow learning, adaptation and improvement.

The opening paragraphs in the description of upROSE refer to the work that will be carried out to collect, display and use relevant information in an effective and participatory way. This is a critical part of the project because it needs to take account of the web of identities, beliefs, capabilities, resource limitations, rules and other factors that constrain and enable how people make decisions and behave. In my view information will need to be collected, displayed and used in ways that reflect differences in constraints and enablers. One way to identify and respond to these differences is to use the Cynefin Framework™ developed by Prof. David Snowden and his colleagues. (NB. Cynefin is a Welsh word and is pronounced Ku-nev-in). This was introduced in a cover article “A Leader’s Framework for Decision Making” in the Harvard Business Review in November 2007 and is now widely cited. My overview of the Cynefin Framework can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/ThinkClarity_Cynefin.

The benefit of using the Cynefin Framework is that it allows the identification of aspects of the situation that are complex (rather than obvious, complicated or chaotic) and that are therefore amenable to the use of SenseMaker®. This collects experience-based data in narrative and visual fragments and allows the person who provides the data to signify what it (and the wider lived experience to which it provides access) means to them in their own context. Signification of the data indexes the importance of the experience in relation to a carefully crafted set of values and, in doing so, codes the qualitative data in a quantitative framework without the cost, time and bias that are often difficult to avoid in other qualitative methodologies. Indexed data are displayed in a small number of 'ethnographic maps' which, when sufficient data points have been collected, allow the identification of patterns and outliers. Regular capture, signification and mapping of new fragments, for example through the use of a diary or journal application powered by SenseMaker®, enables individuals, families and home visitors to work together to identify movements in patterns. Importantly it also allows them to highlight the impact of small scale 'safe-to-fail' actions that nudge and navigate changes in behavior and the underlying resilience profile. Data collected from and used with individual families can be aggregated anonymously to describe the wider landscape of the resilience profiles of families supported by teams of home visitors and triangulated with externally measurable inputs, outputs and outcomes. The CPPR team are familiar with the use of SenseMaker® and would be able to use it to good effect in a mixed methods approach to the work. An overview of SenseMaker® can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/ThinkClarity_SMOverview

Using SenseMaker® to create insight in to complex aspects of the situation has two further benefits. First, in line with Karl E. Weick's question "How can I know what I think until I see what I say" (The Social Psychology of Organising 1979: 207), it allows people to externalise what they think and to reflect on how they make sense of their world. Second it enables people to release change in their lives by providing a new narrative and / or new interpretation of the past.

For me, the key challenge and opportunity for upROSE is to think about the way information is collected, displayed and used from the 'inside out' - that is by standing in the shoes of the people who are being asked to engage with the process. This fits well with upROSE's commitment to the use of Human Centred Design. The Cynefin Framework™ and SenseMaker® would provide a valuable contribution to this endeavour.

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Team

Paul, thank you for the thoughtful feedback and insight. The way you talk about change gives us a lot to think about as we think about engaging individuals and practitioners. Your point about knowing the context of individuals and understanding both the system and the individuals is something we have been talking about this past week. We see the potential in upROSE, but need to spend the time upfront to step back and take a look from the individuals' perspective and the systemic factors that constrain and/or enable, as you mention. Do you know of any SenseMaker frameworks that have been used in a similar situation?

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Team

Hi Jackie. I am not sure that I understand your question well enough to provide a clear response. Typically, the individuals' perspective is identified through their signification of separate fragments and systemic factors are identified in patterns and changes in the wider ethnographic landscape. (Assuming that upROSE will use regular / continuous capture of data e.g. through a diary-based application, individuals will need to input a private / anonymized code to link their entries).

Constraints and enablers typically emerge from exploration of the patterns and landscape rather than being 'coded' in a specific signification framework. However, having said this, my concept of 'stress-testing' a framework for the potential value and impact of data mapped through it will typically highlight constraints and enablers because the test includes implicit consideration of the anticipated way(s) in which complex aspects of the system are disposed to evolve.

While you would need to design and test one or more SenseMaker frameworks for the upROSE projects, these are likely to be able to make use of a triads and dyads from an informal library of signifiers available through the practitioner network.

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

Sorry for not being clear, Paul. I was wondering if others have explored resilience through SM. I'll reach out on the Slack channel. Thanks so much for your input. Lots to think about, especially using SM as continuous data capture to see how experiences would/could change.

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Team

No problem, Jackie. Yes, various organisations have explored resilience through SM either directly or via related topics. We can chat about specifics when we speak.

Photo of Lisa Rue
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Love this idea. We may be able to help you with our resiliency measures for adolescents and mental health recovery. I think your focus on hope is an effective strategy for families who are struggling with poverty.

Photo of Jared Barton
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Lisa We would be happy to check out measures you've developed around resilience. Would you mind sharing a link where we could learn more?

Photo of Lisa Rue
Team

Hi Jared, These are the articles related to the measures we have for resiliency. I need to meet with our team and discuss the process for use of these measures. Lusczakoski, K. D., Olmos, P. A., Millnor, W., & McKinney, C. J. (2016). Measuring Mental Health Recovery: An Application of the Rasch Modeling to the Consumer Recovery Measure. The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 43 (1), 104-115.
• Lusczakoski, K. D., P. Olmos-Gallo, McKinney, C. J., Starks, R., & Huff, S. (2014). Measuring Recovery Related Outcomes: A Psychometric Investigation of the Recovery Markers Inventory. Community Mental Health Journal, 50 (8), 896–902.

Photo of Jared Barton
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Thank you for providing these references, Lisa. We'll take a look and see if it generates any questions.

Photo of Lisa Rue
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Hi Jared, I voted for ROSE in your recent survey. Here are the citations for our resiliency scales. If you have further questions, I think we should set up a call with our lead, Kate Lusczakoski.

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Team

Layne Jackson Hubbard Iliriana Kacaniku Peggy Sissel, Ed.D. Pegah Carol CarterLayne Jackson Hubbard 
Lisa Rue  Kristen Eshleman Ember Urbach Karl Fundenberger @panMocha64$ @Team 

We hope you'll help us name our app by taking the poll (there's only 1 question!)

https://goo.gl/forms/mIphEmzIdmUAylUH3

We're looking for feedback to help us name our app. Currently, we are calling it upRose (past tense of uprise and implies resilience and hope). Alternatively, we are considering the acronym ROSE (Resilience, Opportunity, Support, Engagement). We're also open to other suggestions that fit into a botanical theme.

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Team

We recently met with a group of foster home resource staff and had them imagine what success looked like for children and foster families and themselves. They had to generate what a child or a family would feel or say in a perfect future. What was really striking to me was the messages and wishes of hope and resilience that came out of that exercise. Instead of thinking about what was wrong with the system, we changed the narrative to what success/the future could or would look like and then how can we all get there. It really opened up some great conversations and shifted the mindset to a hope framework and I can see how this kind of web-based tool could change the conversation in social services. Can others think about how this web-based tool could be used in other domains beyond home visiting? It might open up a few other ways of thinking about how to design this and frame it for practioners working with children and families in a lot of different capacities.

Photo of Rebecca Gillam
Team

This is a great point, Teri Garstka. I would think there is a lot of application beyond home visiting - really in any work with youth or families where programs/people are currently measuring risk, the idea of using a tool that makes resilience measures a part of the norm seems appealing. Strengths-based practice in action.

Photo of Iliriana Kacaniku
Team

Dear Teri Garstka 
Thank you for sharing this valuable insight with us. Based on your description it sounds to me like a session of understanding and defining the problem, a core tenet of the design thinking. To be honest, the fact that it makes us look into the present and the future, rather than the past, is the reason why I became a huge fan of this method, after spending almost two decades in log-frame world. And the EC Prize merges these two perfectly.

Thank you again for sharing this valuable experience with our community.

Best regards,
Iliriana

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Team

The idea of hope is also central to Words To Grow On's premise. The birth of a child is a natural time to foster hope, but so many factors (stress, poverty, uncertainty, lack of support, and more) diminish and eventually can burn out that flame. We want to bring people together to explore ways to build baby's potential by using the untapped power that all parents have - the power of talk. We encourage them to talk with their babies and talk with each other about the hopes and dreams they have for their children, and then help them see a path forward. I applaud your approach, and look forward learning more!

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Team

Peggy Sissel I'd like to hear more about Words to Grow and what approaches you are using with families to support hope talk. Are you seeing changes in attachment? Parent-child interaction? In our work, we also talk about "nexting" to generate a future orientation. I've looked at your brochure http://www.wordstogrowon.com/WTGO_brochure_for_parents.pdf and love the ideas that you suggest for engagement. We've also started a project called Bounce Back Books to catalog books that promote aspects of resilience. Perhaps we could compare notes!

Photo of Peggy Sissel, Ed.D.
Team

We are going to be offering a range of products and services. One is our home "Power Up Parties" for parents. We address hopes and dreams parents have for their children, and what parents can do to help them grow and develop. We also build support for encouraging each other to move toward those goals. Another is our smart phone app "Time2Talk2Baby." Check out the results of the random control trial we did with support from HRSA. www.time2talk2baby.com/about

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

Thanks for the info @Peggy Sissel. I will check these out! It's so exciting that you are developing tools to support hope from the earliest years.

Photo of Peggy Sissel, Ed.D.
Team

By the way - I love the term "nexting!" The importance of creating future-focused role models for youth cannot be understated, but parents also need support to pursue positive steps. We aim to capitalize on the entrepreneurial dreams of people who want to earn money while making a difference in their community. Just imagine!

Photo of Rebecca Gillam
Team

I totally agree! "Nexting" is a really simple yet powerful way to build hope. It's never too early to start getting our kids thinking about the future.

Photo of Pegah
Team

I like the main approach of focusing on strengths and resiliency of families. One question I have is how will this program address the specific needs of minority families? I think in some early childhood interventions there is a tendency to approach what "strength" and "resiliency" means through a normative perspective (e.g. primarily White, America, able bodied, etc.). Additionally with the idea that if there are "areas of improvement" these might actually not mean the same thing to minority families. One area of investigation worth examining is how these assessments are working for both minority and non-minority families and as a result, service providers approach in creating goals with families. I see in the Ideation phase of the program it states "First, we will assess existing tools and measures to determine whether or not they fit our understanding of end user needs and goals (as gleaned during the Inspiration phase). With input from home visitors, we will determine whether these assessments ask the right questions and measure the human characteristics we hope to highlight. If they don’t, we will adapt, refine, and develop new tools." I like that there is room here for growth and change; I am left wondering, how? Also, how are families involved with this process? It's important to note that assessments and tools are also created in such a way that it voices the beliefs and values of a select few and that families of minority status may hold differing beliefs and values when it comes to rearing their children, parent attachment styles, and even conceptualizations of resiliency and strength. This is definitely a step in the right direction such that it doesn't focus on the deficits of families or dictate that there is "one-size fits all" approach to empowering parents and I look forward to how this progresses and grows!

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

Thank you for your feedback @Pegah. We agree with your observations about the tendency to apply normative perspectives to minority families. We don't want to do that with UpROSE. As you noted, in the ideation phase, we plan to examine assessments for fit with user needs and goals. That process will include looking at the sample populations where the assessments were developed and where they have been used. We will also conduct a literature review to see if our key terms mean the same thing in non-white cultures. We used a similar process in the exploration of protective factors in Hispanic communities. We found some differences in the terms. We'd employ a similar process in the development of the resiliency suite. However, we know this is not enough. We'd like to use human centered design and talk to families who would be using the profiles. If the terms and the tool does not resonate with families, we will not have achieved our intention of using a strengths-based approach to empower families. We are continually learning and want UpROSE to reflect our commitment to cultural humility. What other suggestions do you have for us? Thanks!

Photo of Jared Barton
Team

Hi Pegah 
Our proposal team has discussed your comment a few times now. We've decided that we're going to develop a visual and/or storyboard to give some life and illustration to how this proposal will address your comment. We'll keep in touch and let you know when its complete.
Thanks for helping us think bigger about this work!
Jared

Photo of Carol Carter
Team

Good morning,
This is Carol Carter- I am thrilled to see that we are teammates on this platform! I would love to hear more about your work in Early Childhood Education/Development and what points of collaboration and/or synergies you noticed in our proposals. My organization is called GlobalMindED, and we host an annual conference that includes an Early Childhood track that might be of particular interest to your partner organizations! Feel free to visit our website to learn more: http://www.globalminded.org/. We are also in the preliminary stages of organizing a pre-conference meeting of interested parties focused specifically on ECE, many of whom submitted proposals for the Gary Community Investments Innovation Prize, so keep that in mind if that is something any of your partner organizations might be interested in. Looking forward to hearing from you.
Best,
Carol

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Team

Carol Carter Thanks for reaching out. This conference looks fantastic. Would love to learn more about your work with youth and also talk with you about the pre-conference. We do some work with digital badging to help youth explore and discover their sparks. Copying my colleague Michael Lemon to connect on badging. Will get back with you about your first question on collaboration and synergies on our proposals.

Photo of Michael Lemon
Team

Carol Carter thank you for your comments on our submission! I would love to talk to you more about our digital badging work: http://ksdigitalbadges.com We are currently working with youth development programs that work specifically with low-income, first-generation youth -- all with the goal of gaining access to post-secondary education. As a first-generation college student, I am very aware of the challenges these students face. I just checked out your conference and it looks amazing! I would love to find out more about it and the work you all are doing at Global Mind ED!

Photo of Jared Barton
Team

Hi Carol Carter 
I read through your proposal for the H.O.P.E. HUB in Denver's Housing Authority. That's a fantastic idea, and it gives us a spark to see that others share our understanding that working with families facing complex social issues requires multi-generational approaches. I certainly see a number of other areas where our proposals overlap. Specifically, we share a common approach of connecting trained early childhood service providers directly with parents caring for infants and young children in addition to experiencing other significant risks like poverty, single parenthood, and housing needs. Furthermore, we've both selected to support families in natural environments like homes and community-based settings.

Obviously, we have chosen to focus our proposal, at least in the beginning, on home visiting programs. However, we have heard from several folks about the possibility that upROSE could drive resilience and strengths based approaches in multiple early childhood service domains beyond just home visiting. This feedback has been very encouraging because we believe upROSE has broader potential as well. We are currently discussing how we could expand and improve this work. Your proposal to create the HUB to support families in DHA brings this work to the forefront of the housing domain! Perhaps, it also presents an opportunity for us to partner to support families in need.

Good luck with your proposal! I look forward to seeing its progress and hope it comes to fruition.

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Team

Hi again! I just thought of a resource you may want to look into, if you aren't already aware of it. It's called the Family Map. I think it presents a family's strengths in diagrammatic form. It too is used in home visiting. Its creator is Leann Whiteside-Mansell, in the department of Family and Preventative Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

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Team

@Peggy Sissel, Ed.D. They do awesome work in Arkansas with home visiting. I'll definitely reach out to them to learn more. I like the way the map is meant to start conversations. The relationships are what is crucial. I also like that they have developed and tested the map with different groups. Thank you so much for all of your support and for passing on resources.

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Team

Hi Folks! I thought of you last night during Oprah's acceptance talk at the Golden Globe awards. Talk about a commercial for HOPE! Very inspiring. If you haven't seen it, it is a must!

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

I did see it! Very exciting and hit all the notes. It's powerful to think about how powerful role models are and how knowing that someone believes in you can make all the difference.

Photo of Keil
Team

This seems like a fantastic proposal. I've seen first-hand the power that a conversation about adverse childhood experiences can be with a family. I think that expanding the tools for home visitors on this topic is necessary, and timely.

Photo of panMocha64$
Team

This sounds wonderful. Having been a home visitor, I've seen some amazing results from the support and trusting relationships that develop between a family and their home visitor.

Photo of Mark
Team

Across Western Europe (including UK), Canada, Australia and NZ there are a lot of organisations working on the exact same issues as covered in this excellent proposal - The work includes new theory, practice development & IT tools - all to support better practice - while a lot of what they do is contextually specific and doesn't translate to other societies - surely with a platform like UpROSE we could look to how sharing ACE scores and other data could occur across societies??

For some ideas - have a look at:
http://www.abetterstart.nz/en/our-challenge.html
http://dunedinstudy.otago.ac.nz

Health systems are already making great progress with tools like interRAI - the global Needs Assessment tool.

What if we did an even better job than we already are with joining up Social care?

An example of a NZ programme with a significant Home visit component is http://westreap.org.nz/incredible-years/

If it works in Kansas it should work in Westland, NZ and South Wales and ...

Photo of Jessica Sprague-Jones
Team

Mark, I love this idea! I have a background in comparative social research and see a huge opportunity to understand how structural and societal factors interplay with ACEs and resilience in families, with potentially important implications for practice. I think I speak for the entire team when I say we would love to partner internationally on this. Thanks for posting these resources -- I look forward to reading them!

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Team

I love the design! I work in a field where there is also increasing interest in how to use cell phones and texting to increase client engagement -- are there plans to have a user interface for the families so they can see their data, and possibly even “tap into” and be reminded of their strengths on their phones when facing a down time? Or perhaps a way for the home visitor to schedule regular recurring texts reminding families about their strengths? The possibilities are endless!

Photo of Jared Barton
Team

Jenny Welch Buller you've described some of the longer term visions and ideas for this project. We're definitely interested in interfaces which would allow families to access and utilize their own data. We've commonly referred to them as Parent & Family Portals. Not necessarily what we'd call it in practice, but it's an idea we want to explore. The idea to give practitioners an interface to communicate strengths to families they serve is another innovative idea for this approach that we hadn't yet considered. Thanks!

As a part of our human centered design phases, we'll be interested to hear more from home visitors and families about the best places to start.

Photo of Shawna
Team

I really like the idea of Resilience Profiles and framing things from a strengths based perspective. Do you envision this work will someday move beyond early childhood?

Photo of Amanda Davis
Team

I love the idea of moving this beyond the early childhood realm! I understand starting with that population but think that expanding beyond the earliest ages could have a significant positive impact on the community around us.

Photo of Jenny Welch Buller
Team

Agreed Amanda Davis and Shawna ! I work with programs serving adults in work programs. There is a great need and interest in tools to help case managers practice a strengths-based approach as well as tools to help them interpret and apply assessment results. Fingers crossed!

Photo of Katy Merriweather
Team

Hello! I am very excited about resiliency and looking forward to reading more about this idea as it hopefully progresses. I was wondering how this project will address accessibility for populations with disabilities?

Photo of Ember Urbach
Team

Katy Merriweather That's a fantastic question. I think we think of technology as being inherently more universal for different populations, which causes us to overlook barriers to others. I think partnering with an accessibility agency would be helpful on this project.

I also wonder how this app would work with families who do not have internet access. Even with a 4G/mobile tethering, many people don't have data signal in rural/frontier areas. But it sounds like an internet connection isn't necessary for inputs.

Photo of Sara O'Keeffe
Team

Katy, I was thinking this as well, and think it would be great if home visitors and parents with experience working alongside persons with disabilities also provide feedback to your question!

Photo of Dylan Woods
Team

That's a great question. And very Human Centered Design! I'd be interested to see what modifications could be made and how they may positively impact all users as a result.

Photo of Teri Garstka
Team

One thing I wondered about our approach in the ideation phase is what are some meaningful ways or approaches to have families involved in this process in addition to home visiting practioners? Specifically, what are innovative, creative ways that others have involved families with children in the process for ideation and human centered design around a resiliency suite like this? How would families be involved in their own conversations about resiliency - are there other domains beyond what we have identified that resonate with how an individual defines resiliency? I'm excited to include families in UpRose!

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Team

This input and involvement is so critical. It would be interesting to hear from families and home visitors about how this platform and approach might change their conversations. What could interactions look like after implementation of upROSE? How might home visitors and families develop different pathways to engagement in services if the conversation and collaboration is focused on resilience?

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Team

I agree with you both. As I was reading the application, my mind when directly to thinking of the target population and how they could weigh in on this idea. Society continues to mature and that has pushed us in a direction where technology is key to maintaining engagement with one another, this includes families. I'm going to share this with some of my child welfare peers for some feedback.
Because many of the families enrolled in home visiting potentially have a lot of services/professionals surrounding them, I think it's important to give them a tool that feels like a resource and not something that assigns them work (i.e. Assessments Completed, Need Complete) or tells them when they have fallen short (i.e. Needs Work, Excelling). If a parent is feeling depressed or stressed out, maybe they can select a tool/assessment to help them understand ways to cope. Perhaps this application has categories to choose from that the parent or home visitor would like to focus on which populates specific tools/assessments. Giving the end user the power to better control how the application can be used may encourage buy in and more regular use of the tool.
I am so happy to be part of a Center that is innovative, passionate, considerate, and straight up Rock Stars!

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Team

I am also interested in the ideation phase and what resiliency looks like at the local levels. What does resiliency look like across communities? I think families and local practitioners are the key to understanding community specific resiliency. Focus groups sound like an important way to determine successful strategies for local implementation.

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Team

I really appreciate how this project has been not only put together by an innovative team, but reflects brilliantly the diversity of individuals who work with families involved in home visiting. Good work, team! I hope to see upROSE in action as an innovative technology solution to social issues.

Photo of Karl Fundenberger
Team

I love the branding! In my mind, it really eases the approach of what could be a daunting task - making a successful home visit, and doing the work to help these kids.

Photo of Jared Barton
Team

Karl Fundenberger Thank you for your comment! We are excited about this approach, and it's great to hear it resonates with someone else. You mentioned you liked the branding. We have actually had internal conversations about the name upROSE and whether or not we could come up with something better. Would you tell me us what the branding means to you and why you like it? It would help us continue these internal conversations.

Photo of Karl Fundenberger
Team

I particularly like the colors and the floral theme throughout. It just gives the whole project a soft and reassuring feel, like, "Yes, you can do this." I think the name is fine - it maybe doesn't even need the "up" at the beginning. Project Rose: Promoting Resilience.

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Team

@Kristen Eshleman Thanks for the feedback. I love the idea of UpROSE playing a role in economic mobility. Could you provide some ideas on what you think that would like like? How could communities use the Resilience Profiles as part of the innovation ecosystem? Very interested to hear your ideas.

Photo of Kristen Eshleman
Team

This looks great! Cities working on economic mobility improvements should incorporate this into complex strategies. Characteristics of resilience have a role to play in developing the kinds of innovation ecosystems that correlate strongly to upward mobility. Kudos!

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

I'd also be really interested in hearing if this idea has potential for organizations outside the U.S. We have learned so much from what is happening around the world. Does this idea have utility for other folks working to promote resilience?

Photo of Jules Yim
Team

Great stuff, Jackie!

Photo of Layne Jackson Hubbard
Team

Dear KU Center for Public Partnerships and Research,

I love that you are using the ACE questionnaire on Adverse Childhood Experiences in your work! I have been following this research for a few years, and I think that it can be transformative to understand these experiences and how they can affect our future health outcomes. I especially appreciate that you are working with the parents to help them understand their scores, as I see this having a preventative effect on future health complications—which certainly affect the health and safety of the children in the home.

Also, Nadine Burke Harris is a hero of mine and has taught me a lot about the importance of ACEs.

Her Ted Talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/nadine_burke_harris_how_childhood_trauma_affects_health_across_a_lifetime
Her Organization: https://centerforyouthwellness.org/
NPR ACE Scoring: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/03/02/387007941/take-the-ace-quiz-and-learn-what-it-does-and-doesnt-mean

Can you share with me your methods for resilience, especially for those with high ACE scores?

While researching this question awhile back, I came across a blogger who had contacted Dr. Vincent Felitti, one of the authors of the original ACE study. http://healwritenow.com/dr-filettis-suggestions-for-high-ace-scorers/

Dr. Felitti's advice for those with high ACE scores was:
-EMDR (Eye-Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing
-Ericksonian Hypnotherapy
-Websites: (Founder/Editor, Jane Ellen Stevens) www.acestoohigh.com
-Books: The Body Keeps Score,Brain, Mind & Body in the Healing of Trauma, Bessel van der Kolk , MD.; Scared Sick: The Role of Childhood Trauma in Adult Disease, Robin Karr-Morse; Jane Ellen Stevens, forthcoming 2015

While EMDR is a research-supported tool for mitigating trauma, it's also not necessarily accessible for many low-income populations. What methods do you employ, and what results have you seen? (I'd love to learn more about your strengths-based approaches).

Thanks for your help with this fascinating and important work!
Layne

Photo of Jackie Counts
Team

Dear Layne Thank you so much for your comments. I share your fascination with the ACEs research and am a fan of many of the authors you cite. There are a few that you listed that I need to check out. I'd also add Childhood Disrupted by Donna Jackson Nakazawa.

Several years ago, I was at a home visiting conference. I attended a session on using ACEs with families. Like you, I believe that the ACEs research has the power to transform how people understand their past and engage with their future. At the time, there wasn't a lot of professional development available to help social service professionals have a conversation about ACEs, and there was some concern that doing so could re-traumatize the family. I have found the opposite to be true in my work with families.

I had breakfast with a colleague and mentioned that I'd like to develop some type of training to empower social service professionals to use ACEs in their work. She said, "Let's do it." And that's how our passion project Lemonade for Life (LfL) was born. http://lemonadeforlife.com/

(I'm giving you this background to answer your question about our methods for resilience.) We wanted to create an approach that was not only trauma-informed, but hope-infused. LfL is not a program, but rather an approach and way of interacting with people to help them understand their past and be empowered about influencing their future. Included in LfL are many tools for parents to learn about early brain development and the power they have to shape their child's future. We also include practical exercises for individuals to recognize times when they have overcome adversity. Hope and mindset are also two of our strategies to foster resilience. These strategies are critical for both the professionals and for the individuals, for if individuals don't believe that change is possible, then that is a pretty significant roadblock. We also use hope as a change strategy. Hope is not wishful thinking, but is composed of two parts--the idea that something can be different, and the pathways to get their. For individuals who have high ACEs and have experienced toxic stress, we strive to open up different pathways other that fight, flight, or freeze. To date, we have trained over 700 individuals on LfL. Our developmental evaluation shows promising results. Home visitors report that families are more engaged and the relationship changes when they recognize why life may have been so hard. Here's the link to our article and results: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740917304528

If you have troubling accessing, let me know. Here's also a blog about the approach: http://kucppr.org/ideas-in-motion/the-juice-is-worth-the-squeeze-the-development-of-lemonade-for-life/

We believe that individuals are more than their ACE scores. However, services need to reflect this belief. Individuals need to enter services knowing how resilient they are, rather than that they have a high ACE score, are more likely to have negative social outcomes, and a lower life expectancy. So, that is how the need for UpROSE came about. How would engagement in services change if individuals saw their ACE score in relation to their resilience profile? Let me know if I've answered your question. I'd love to hear your thoughts and more about your work.

Best,
Jackie