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Whose Face is That?

In this story Penelope discovers eyes, ears, noses, & more as she and her grandmother, Antoinette, visit their favorite places in the city.

Photo of Sophia Ezomoghene
7 2

Written by

[Opening: Antoinette, a grandmother, and her granddaughter, Penelope, are leaving their row home to begin their day.]


Whose face is that?

Is that my face,

with its' eyes bright and warm?


No, those eyes belong to Mr. De Leon.

[Mr. De Leon is a city sanitation worker. He is waving to Antoinette and Penelope as they walk down the street.]


Whose ears are those?

Are those my ears listening so well?


No, those ears belong to Tao.

[Tao, a toddler and neighbor, is walking with his grandmother. Antoinette and Penelope stop to chat.]


Whose face is that?

Is that my face,

with its' nose wide and proud?


No, that nose belongs to Ms. Fube.

[Ms. Fube is a children’s librarian. Antoinette and Penelope are listening to a read aloud during toddler storytime.]


Whose mouth is that?

Is that my mouth,

with its full lips turning up into a smile?


No, that smile belongs to Officer Cunningham.

[Officer Cunningham is a city police officer. She smiles at Antoinette and Penelope as they play in the park.]


Whose hair is that?

Is that my hair,

with its soft curls twisting into locks?


No, those locks belong to Mr. Marcus.

[Mr. Marcus is a mail carrier. He hands Antoinette and Penelope their mail as they return home.]


Whose face is that?

Is that my face,

brown and around 

looking back at me?


Yes, that face belongs to you

brown and round,

strong and proud

looking back at you.

[Antoinette and Penelope are at home looking at themselves in a mirror.]


[NOTE: The last page of this book should contain a reflective/mirror like material, that would allow a child and a guardian to look at themselves and discuss what they see.]

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

I imagine a caregiver reading this story with their child. While they are reading, the caregiver is helping to identify the child's nose, ears, mouth, etc. They are also making connections between the community helpers in the book and the people they themselves see everyday.

Share your suggested book title

Whose Face is That?

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Whose face is that? Is that my face, with its' eyes bright and warm? No, those eyes belong to Mr. De Leon. Whose ears are those? Are those my ears listening so well? No, those ears belong to Tao. Whose face is that? Is that my face, with its' nose wide and proud? No, that nose belongs to Ms. Fube. Whose mouth is that? Is that my mouth, with its full lips turning up into a smile? No, that smile belongs to Officer Cunningham. Whose hair is that? Is that my hair, with its soft curls twisting into locks? No, those locks belong to Mr. Marcus. Whose face is that? Is that my face, brown and around looking back at me? Yes, that face belongs to you brown and round, strong and proud looking back at you.

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

With this book caregivers will be able to help build their child's vocabulary by using the pictures to discuss new words and to reinforce old words such as eyes, mouth, and ears. Not only does this book introduce a number of tier 1 words it also introduces an opportunity to discuss the roles of community helpers such as police officers, librarians and postal workers. The familiar situations and settings of attending storytime at the neighborhood library or playing in the park will allow children to make connections with what they see in the story and what they themselves have experienced. In addition, including a "mirror" at the end of the story would help to extend conversations about facial features and body parts. For example, while looking at themselves in the "mirror" children and their guardians can point out their eyes and hair to identify colors, texture, length and even compare and contrast. Source: https://www.pediatriccarectr.com/pcc-reads/

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I currently live and work in Philadelphia, PA.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

In writing Whose Face is That? I imagined a grandmother similar to the persona Josephine, taking her granddaughter out and about around town. Just like Josephine, I imagined this grandmother to have a network of neighbors and friends or community helpers who support her and her granddaughter. I hope caregivers and children, specifically people of color, see themselves in the story. I hope this book serves as a positive representation of an African-American family living in a diverse city neighborhood loving each other and growing together.

Location: Country

USA

Location: State or Department

Pennsylvania

Location: City

Philadelphia

Tell us more about you / your team

I'm currently an early childhood literacy specialist. I taught Head Start for two years in South Philadelphia. I also taught prekindergarten and kindergarten for four years in Washington, DC. I'm an avid reader of picture, middle grade, and YA books. However, I wish there were more stories that represented people of color in a variety of settings, situations, and time periods.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • No

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Twitter

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists
  • I am an educator

7 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Spam
Photo of Jennifer Buis
Team

Sophia, very interactive for child and reader! Nice job! Best wishes today!
Jennifer Buis
Author of Buddy Goes To Clark Park in West Philadelphia
( Based on a true story and told through the eyes of Buddy our rescue dog.)

Spam
Photo of Robyn Campbell
Team

Wonderful job. Best of luck.

Spam
Photo of Sophia Ezomoghene
Team

Thank you!

Spam
Photo of Stephanie Hanson
Team

What a fun introduction to community helpers and basic body parts for little babies! Good luck!

Spam
Photo of Sophia Ezomoghene
Team

Thank you!

Spam
Photo of Dawnnbooks .
Team

Good capture of the curiosity of toddlers.
Nicely done.
Good luck to us all.

Spam
Photo of Sophia Ezomoghene
Team

Thank you and same to you!