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Where We Live is Brotherly Love and Freedom that Rings

A child and her caregiver walk through their community, observing unique and familiar sights, repeating an inspiring refrain.

Photo of Norah Sinclair
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Who will we see, in this place where we live, of brotherly love and freedom that rings?

Who will we see, when we walk through Love park?  Let’s take the bridge, down by the river, past the old square, run through the fountain, we are one in brotherly love, fly like an eagle, let freedom ring.

Who will we see out in our neighborhood? Run up the steps, see the old bell, pick up the take-out, listen to the church bells, we are one in brotherly love, soar like an eagle, let freedom ring.

Who will we see down at the market? Go past the corner, get on the trolley, wave to our old friends, say hi to our new friends, we are one in brotherly love, flock like an eagle, let freedom ring.

Who will we see as we walk down our block? Back to our home, past the school yard, see the tall buildings, see the night stars, we are one in brotherly love, see like an eagle, let freedom ring.

Who will we see sitting round our table? Let’s eat our dinner, talk about our day now, clean up the dishes, play a game of checkers, we are one in brotherly love, be like an eagle, let freedom ring.

Who will we see now that it’s evening? Hear another story, see the bright moon, ready for bed now, kiss on the head, we are one in brotherly love, rise like an eagle, and let freedom ring.

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

I see the content, the structure, and images in the book engaging both the child and caregiver with its familiarity, rhythm, and repetition, and in turn the engaging experience while reading the book will inspire a similar interaction and engagement between the child and caregiver when they are out in the community experiencing the places and activities depicted in the book. I also want the symbols and imagery of the refrain to spark inspiration, connection, and pride.

Share your suggested book title

Where We Live is Brotherly Love and Freedom that Rings

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Who will we see, in this place where we live, of brotherly love and freedom that rings? Who will we see, when we walk through Love park? Let’s take the bridge, down by the river, past the old square, run through the fountain, we are one in brotherly love, fly like an eagle, let freedom ring. Who will we see out in our neighborhood? Run up the steps, see the old bell, pick up the take-out, listen to the church bells, we are one in brotherly love, soar like an eagle, let freedom ring. Who will we see down at the market? Go past the corner, get on the trolley, wave to our old friends, say hi to our new friends, we are one in brotherly love, flock like an eagle, let freedom ring. Who will we see as we walk down our block? Back to our home, past the school yard, see the tall buildings, see the night stars, we are one in brotherly love, see like an eagle, let freedom ring. Who will we see sitting round our table? Let’s eat our dinner, talk about our day now, clean up the dishes, play a game of checkers, we are one in brotherly love, be like an eagle, let freedom ring. Who will we see now that it’s evening? Hear another story, see the bright moon, ready for bed now, kiss on the head, we are one in brotherly love, rise like an eagle, and let freedom ring.

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

Rhyme, repetition, and rhythm make the story enjoyable for the child and the caregiver, encouraging interaction and communication that helps support their relationship, the child’s language development, and a pride in their community. The story uses tier one and tier two words throughout. Colorful, friendly, images of the community landscape and landmarks capture the attention of the child and caregiver and invite engagement and discussion: “This is the square we pass every day on the way to school.” “Here is the bridge that goes into town and over to Aunt Rita’s house.” Additional text around and throughout the images invites dialogue and engagement between caregivers and children: “Have you been here?” “Where does this bridge go?” “What sound does the train make?” Illustrations also include repeated images of several of the thematic words: Love, freedom, ring, fly, soar, rise. A friendly eagle is found throughout and can be used for additional interaction and engagement.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

Philadelphia is a diverse, thriving, urban community with a unique and strong character rooted in history, sports, arts and culture, and the physical space. Many of the symbols and characteristics associated with Philadelphia reflect the positive symbols we identify with a strong democracy, strong communities, strong families, and strong individuals within those communities. This story uses those images and symbols associated with Philadelphia: brotherly love, freedom, and an eagle that resonate with the character of our country, a strong community, and pride in the places, communities, and families where we live. I live in Atlanta, a diverse urban community, with history and beauty.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

A child and her caregiver walk through their Philadelphia community, noticing the landmarks that are unique to their city, but also engaging in the day-to-day elements of their community that are familiar to many, all the while communicating and interacting in a way that supports the foundation of strong relationships, early development, and learning. I also hope to convey a sense of pride and community ties that exist in walkable places where neighbors see and greet each other in their day-to-day activities.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

Georgia

Location: City

Atlanta

Tell us more about you / your team

I am an educator, designer, and mother who loves the beauty and poetry of children's books. Some of the most treasured and rewarding time with my children was spent reading books that we loved over and over and talking and singing with each other on walks in our neighborhood and out in the community. When children and caregivers spend time together talking, singing, and enjoying each other, they form strong relationships, that provides a foundation for engagement in school and in the community. Children's books and engagement with others, sparks curiosity, problem solving and lifelong learning that nurtures happy and whole human beings.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • No

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • OpenIDEO announcement email

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • Educator, writer, designer

Inspired by (1)

What We See
       1, 2, 3

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Photo of Robyn Campbell
Team

Great job. Best of luck!

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