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Let's Find Colors!

This manuscript offers common colors as basis for crucial interaction between reader and caregiver, inside and outside of the story.

Photo of Virginia Brackett

Written by

Inside, outside, what do we see?

Colors surrounding you and me.

Inside a rainbow every day;

Let’s find colors as we play.

Art note: as the caregiver/child pair walk out of an apartment building, they appear to pass through a rainbow, represented by the colors of objects they see

BLUE

Blue on the carousel, blue in the zoo,

Blue in berries and on a choo-choo.

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy blue, you and I.

Art note: The Philadelphia Children’s Park Carousel is featured, as are its remarkable Victoria crowned pigeons. A child reading a book with a blue cover sits at the edge of the carousel.

RED

Red in apples, red in lips,

Red in shoes and a flag on a ship.

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy red, you and I.

Art note: The Philadelphia Spruce Street Harbor Park is featured as the caregiver and child stare at a large ship with flags flying. The caregiver and child are eating red apples as they walk among many people on the Boardwalk. A child reading a book with a red cover sits beside her caregiver, who points to the book, on a boardwalk bench.

ORANGE

Orange in juice, orange in the sun,

Orange in vests where work is done.

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy orange, you and I.

Art note: A street repair site is featured with workers in orange vests.  The caregiver and child point to and discuss the workers as they walk by on a sidewalk. A worker reading a book with an orange cover sits next to a co-worker on a bench, each with open lunchboxes. Two children are signing "eat" on a corner.

YELLOW

Yellow in your jacket, yellow in corn,

Yellow on the bus honking its horn.

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy yellow, you and I.

Art note: A school site is featured with a yellow school bus and children on the playground in the background.  A child reading a book with a yellow cover can be seen through a window inside the bus. 

PURPLE

Purple in plums, purple on your pants,

Purple in my scarf when I dance!

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy purple, you and I.

Art note: The caregiver (wearing a scarf with a purple design) and child (wearing pants with a purple design) are dancing to music from a nearby radio another visitor has brought to the park. Several figures are signing “dance.” Two children reading a book with a purple cover sit on a picnic blanket.

PINK

Pink in flamingos, pink in your hair,

Pink on the cushion of a favorite chair.

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy pink, you and I.

Art note: A lake site is featured with flamingos and a boy with spiked pink hair. Other figures sit on benches with cushions they have brought with them.  A person is signing the word "eat" to a child with a picnic basket. A book with a pink cover is on the picnic table beside the child.

GREEN

Green in spinach, green in peas,

Green in a frog, green in trees.

Do you want to play “I spy?”

Let’s spy green, you and I.

Art note: The caregiver and child peer into a box that contains several vegetables, like one delivered by Philly Food. They are outside the zoo frog enclosure. A zoo volunteer leans against the building reading a book with a green cover.

Colors that you eat, colors that you wear,

Outside, inside, colors everywhere.

Can you name the colors that we’ve seen?

Blue, Red, Orange, Yellow, Purple, Pink, and Green!

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

Caregivers utilize a common element in every day life - that of color - to open a world of discovery to a young reader through communication, followed by interaction. The importance of reading is emphasized in each scene, as is the presence of a metaphoric rainbow of color - symbolizing imagination - that fills a child's world.

Share your suggested book title

Let's Find Colors!

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Inside, outside, what do we see? Colors surrounding you and me. Inside a rainbow every day; Let’s find colors as we play. BLUE Blue on the carousel, blue in the zoo, Blue in berries and a toy choo-choo. Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy blue, you and I. RED Red in apples, red in lips, Red in shoes and a flag on a ship. Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy red, you and I. ORANGE Orange in juice, orange in the sun, Orange in vests where work is done. Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy orange, you and I. YELLOW Yellow in your jacket, yellow in corn, Yellow on the bus honking its horn. Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy yellow, you and I. PURPLE Purple in plums, purple on your pants, Purple in the scarf I wear when I dance! Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy purple, you and I. PINK Pink in flamingos, pink in your hair, Pink on the cushion of a favorite chair. Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy pink, you and I. GREEN Green in spinach, green in peas, Green in a frog, green in trees. Do you want to play “I spy?” Let’s spy green, you and I. Colors that you eat, colors that you wear, Outside, inside, colors everywhere. Can you name the colors that we’ve seen? Blue, Red, Orange, Yellow, Purple, Pink, or Green?

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

This manuscript provides readers with Tier 1 vocabulary and a rhyme and repetition structure. The goal is for a child to learn to identify colors and to understand their presence in every situation. Readers will identify the specific objects mentioned, and then will respond to questions asking them to find additional objects of the same color in the illustrations. Readers will hopefully expand that ability to identify objects by color in their individual environments. Diversity will be apparent through depiction of individuals with differing cultural backgrounds, varied physical challenges, and different means of communicating. The manuscript contributes to a foundation of language and literacy in young readers, allows authority figures to acknowledge the voices of early readers, and models the view that all are valuable. Applicable experience includes writing my picture book, "What Is My Name?" (Reading Press), and paraphrasing classics for high/low readers, like David Copperfield.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I visited Philadelphia as a child with my family and am familiar with its more popular landmarks. My residency in Chicago and Kansas City provides empathy and identity with residents in an urban environment, like that of Philadelphia.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

The book characters represent diverse members of urban communities, as the caregivers and children featured will change throughout. Interior and exterior illustrations will emphasize colors featured in places specific to Philadelphia, but that could also be found in most urban communities. They include the Philadelphia Zoo, a street work zone where workers wear reflective orange safety vests, a grade school with a bus parked in front of it, the Rittenhouse Square Farmer’s Market, the carousel from the Children’s Park, and the Boardwalk at Harbor Park.

Location: Country

USA

Location: State or Department

Missouri

Location: City

Kansas City

Website URL (optional question)

https://virginiabrackett.com

Tell us more about you / your team

I retired in 2016 from Park University as a Professor Emeritus of English. Service learning was a major focus during my work with students, and I served as a workshop director for service-learning and Honors Programs (http://www.park.edu/faculty-and-staff/people/brackett-virginia/). Since retiring, I continue to value service and supporting others in communication, which has led me to focus on veterans’ issues. For example, I facilitated a discussion of literature for veterans and civilians in spring 2017 as part of “Planting the Oar,” a National Endowment for the Humanities grant-supported initiative (https://thetellingproject.org/planting-the-oar/). Service to veterans remains crucial to me, and I am a member of the Kansas City Veteran’s Writing Committee, which designs and offers Missouri Humanities Council grant-supported bi-annual writing workshops for veterans in partnership with the Kansas City Public Library: see “Special Activities”: https://www.kclibrary.org/readers-services

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

I envision illustrations exploding with colors and figures, but softly textured, as with water colors. That technique will suggest the rainbow through which we all travel everyday.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

200 articles and stories, including Junior Trails, Single Parent, Today’s Family, and Once Upon a Time 15 books, including Restless Genius: The Story of Virginia Woolf, A Home in the Heart: The Story of Sandra Cisneros – both PSLA and Tri-State Awarded- What Is My Name (picture book), The Contingent Self: One Reading Life – Sunbury Press will publish my memoir in the fall and I placed second in the winter Owl Canyon Press Hackathon fiction contest.

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Author newsletter from Sunbury Press

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

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Photo of Perlina Murray
Team

Hi. Hope you working on your stories and keeping optimistic.

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