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Shhh. What can you hear?

Caregivers and young children listen and talk about their familiar home, using repetition, introducing new vocab and environmental sounds

Photo of Rebecca Bright

Written by

It’s early in the morning.  It's noisy outside!


Shhh. What can you hear?


Clickety clack. Clickety clack.


It’s the busy trolley rattling along on its tracks.

Let's say it together

Clickety clack. Clickety clack.




It’s nearly time for breakfast. It's noisy outside!


Shhh. What can you hear?


Splip splot. Splip splot. 


It’s the rain landing on the umbrellas.

Let's say it together

Splip splot. Splip splot.



It’s time for morning nap. It's noisy outside.


Shhh. What can you hear?


Woosh woosh. Woosh woosh.


It’s the cars driving through the big puddles.

Let's say it together

Woosh woosh. Woosh woosh.



It’s lunchtime in the kitchen. It's noisy outside!


Shhh. What can you hear?


Clang clang. Clang clang. 


It’s the noisy workers fixing the road.

Let's say it together


Clang clang. Clang clang.



It’s playtime on the rug. It's noisy outside!


Shhh. What can you hear?


Tweet tweet. Tweet tweet.


It’s the black and white birds singing in the trees.

Let's say it together


Tweet tweet. Tweet tweet. 



It’s bathtime in the tub. It's noisy outside!


Shhh. What can you hear?


Ring Ring. Ring Ring.


It’s the silver bell on the boy’s green bike.

Let's say it together


Ring ring. Ring ring.



It’s dinner time for everyone. It's noisy *inside*!

Shhh. What can you hear?


Chitter chatter. Chitter chatter.


It’s the whole family!

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

As a speech pathologist I understand the value of using environmental noises to talk about with young children. It helps caregivers share and scaffold language about their immediate environment, which can be both familiar language and novel.

Share your suggested book title

Shhh. What can you hear?

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

1) Before a child can use language, they need to be able to attend to sound. That includes non-speech sounds such as those in the environment. 2) Repetition of new words is important to promote encoding of novel vocabulary 3) Use of onomatopoeia encourages children and adults to link sounds to meaning 4) Asking questions (like "Shh, what can you see?") models use of turn-taking; a key component of verbal communication and social communication development 5) The book shows how parents and caregivers can scaffold language - ie adding more detail to a word; using adjectives and descriptive verbs.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

Sometimes, living in an urban context means that its noisy. Setting the book at the window is a way of reflecting the child's view of their city, what happens in their city over a day including the people, noises and activities. The sample page has been illustrated by the visual designer who I work with.

Location: Country

United Kingdom

Location: State or Department

London

Location: City

London

Website URL (optional question)

www.therapy-box.co.uk

Tell us more about you / your team

Rebecca Bright MBE is a speech pathologist who has delivered an award winning range of digital products all designed to promote language development; support people with communication disabilities and is currently creating a machine learning based tool to help schools identify the 2 children in every classroom that have a hidden disability called "Developmental Language Disorder". Rebecca has two boys, aged 2 and 5; who love to read and share stories.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

The book is set mostly looking out the window at the world around the child. The visual use of bringing the outside in, especially the "noise" is key to this. The style reflects a multi-cultural, intergenerational home, in an inner urban setting (an apartment).

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • No

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • OpenIDEO announcement email

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am a speech pathologist and digital company co-founder

19 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Estela Kennen
Team

Hi Rebecca,
I enjoyed your story very much. There were a couple of spots where the match between the sound and the "actors" threw me. When I read "wish wash," I was expecting a laundry machine or maybe windshield wipers, not a cars driving through puddles. (I actually just looked up the sound to see if I'd been missing something, and it's definitely not wish-wash-y to me. Possibly woosh, woosh?) Also, when I saw the "Beep beep," I was expecting a truck backing up (or maybe a car horn), but not noisy workers fixing the road. Maybe you do mean for the work truck to be making the sound? If so, you might consider making that more clear. To me noisy workers are working with hammers (clang?) or power tools (whirr?) -- but I can see how those are not road-fixing sounds. Hope this makes sense and is a little useful.

Photo of Rebecca Bright
Team

Thanks Estela Kennen ! I have reconsidered the sounds - now the workers are clang clanging not beep beeping! Much appreciated suggestion!

Photo of Estela Kennen
Team

Glad I could help!

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