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WHERE DID SWEETIE PIE GO?

When the family dog carries away the child’s favorite toy, this "lift the flap" story explores city life in a search and find adventure.

Photo of Janie Reinart
9 2

Written by

WHERE DID SWEETIE PIE GO? By Janie Reinart   Please also see the PDF attachment below.

Page 1          Half Title           218 words

[Art suggestions are noted in italics. Participation between child and reader is encouraged with the interaction of lift the flaps. Wordless spread shows Sweetie Pie is a stuffed toy with name on shirt.] 

Page 2

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the sunny city.

[The family puppy takes the toy and dashes from the apartment through the city neighborhood.] 

Page 3

Clank-ity-clank.
Where can you cling and ride, swing and slide?
Sweetie Pie runs at the (lift the flap) playground.

[Puppy goes down slide with toy. Puppy is running with toy before child/parent reaches them.] 

Page 4

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the splashy city.

[The family puppy takes the toy and dashes through the city neighborhood.] 

Page 5

Squirt-y-squirt.
Where can you spray and drip,
play and skip?
Sweetie Pie soaks at the (lift the flap) splash pad.

[Puppy and toy get wet. Puppy is running with toy before child/parent reaches them.] 

Page 6

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go?
Somewhere in the screeching city.

[The family puppy takes the toy and dashes through the city neighborhood.] 

Page 7

Grow-ly-growl.
Where can you hear
roars and squawks,
snores and talks?
Sweetie Pie explores the (lift the flap) zoo.

[Puppy and toy run through zoo. Puppy is running with toy before child/parent reaches them.] 

Page 8

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the yummy city.

 [The family puppy takes the toy and dashes through the city neighborhood.] 

Page 9

Snack-ity-snack.
Where can you
eat and munch,
treat and lunch?
Sweetie Pie sees food at the (lift the flap) market.

[Puppy eats handouts and drags toy. Puppy is running with toy before child/parent reaches them.] 

Page 10

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go?
Somewhere in the beautiful city.

[The family puppy takes the toy and dashes through the city neighborhood.] 

Page 11

Comb-ity-comb.
Where can you
curl and dye,
twirl and dry?
Sweetie Pie sits at the (lift the flap) beauty shop.

[The toy is getting dirtier by the minute. Child/parent catch the puppy with toy.] 

Page 12

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the soapy city.

[The family takes the puppy and the toy with them.] 

Page 13

Scrub-bity-scrub.
Where can you
fluff and rub,
puff and scrub?
Sweetie Pie gets a bath at the (lift the flap) laundromat.

[Toy is in washing machine. Puppy is waiting with parent/child.] 

Page 14

Oh, no!
Where, oh, where
did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the sleepy city.

[The family takes puppy and the toy back to the apartment.] 

Page 15

Where can you hug and hold,
read and be told a story, Sweetie Pie? In my arms at (lift the flap)
home.

[Puppy is near child. Child is holding toy and sitting in parent’s lap listening to a book.] 

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

WHERE DID SWEETIE PIE GO? explores city life in a humorous search and find adventure when the family dog carries away the child’s favorite toy. This lift the flap story focuses on the neighborhood and invites the reader and child to play with words using repetition, rhyme, onomatope, and a question & answer format.

Share your suggested book title

WHERE DID SWEETIE PIE GO?

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

WHERE DID SWEETIE PIE GO? By Janie Reinart Page 1 Half Title [Art suggestions: Wordless spread shows Sweetie Pie is a stuffed toy with name on shirt. The family puppy takes the toy and dashes through the city neighborhood. ] Page 2 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the sunny city. Page 3 Clank-ity-clank. Where can you cling and ride, swing and slide? Sweetie Pie runs at the (lift the flap) playground. Page 4 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the splashy city. Page 5 Squirt-y-squirt. Where can you spray and drip, play and skip? Sweetie Pie soaks at the (lift the flap) splash pad. Page 6 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the screeching city. Page 7 Grow-ly-growl. Where can you hear roars and squawks, snores and talks? Sweetie Pie explores the (lift the flap) zoo. Page 8 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the yummy city. Page 9 Snack-ity-snack. Where can you eat and munch, treat and lunch? Sweetie Pie sees food at the (lift the flap) market. Page 10 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the beautiful city. Page 11 Comb-ity-comb. Where can you curl and dye, twirl and dry? Sweetie Pie sits at the (lift the flap) beauty shop. [ Child/parent catch the puppy with toy.] Page 12 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the soapy city. [The family takes the puppy and the toy with them.] Page 13 Scrub-bity-scrub. Where can you fluff and rub, puff and scrub? Sweetie Pie gets a bath at the (lift the flap) laundromat. [Toy is in washing machine.] Page 14 Oh, no! Where, oh, where did Sweetie Pie go? Somewhere in the sleepy city. [The family takes puppy and the toy back to the apartment.] Page 15 Where can you hug and hold, read and be told a story, Sweetie Pie? In my In my arms at (lift the flap) home.[Puppy is near child. Child with toy are sitting in parents lap.]

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

Being present in the moment and sharing everyday activities helps baby’s language grow. This story shows a parent and child sharing an adventure when the family dog carries away the child’s favorite toy. The question and answer format gives the reader an opportunity to pause and wait for the infant/child to respond and then interact modeling conversation skills. Reading aloud helps baby’s vocabulary grow. The use of a repetitive phrase, rhyme, and onomatopoeia found in this story makes the sounds enjoyable and fun to duplicate. Babies love to imitate and reading a book over and over gives them many chances to “figure things out.” The lift the flap format will encourage the rereading of the story. After many readings, children memorize a story word for word announcing that they are “reading”. Turning the pages and “reading” a favorite story is a pre-reading skill. Teaching speech, theater, and English I share my love of reading and writing with my 15 grandchildren.

Location: Country

USA

Location: State or Department

Ohio

Location: City

Chagrin Falls

Tell us more about you / your team

I am an educator and author who never leaves home without my library card. I was the kid who read during lunch, read when I should have been doing chores, and read late at night with a flashlight under the covers. A speech & theater major, I've enjoyed acting in plays and tried my hand as a professional puppeteer. I worked with children in hospitals through a gentle clown ministry sharing laughter. As an interactive musical storyteller, I've presented original tales in schools, and volunteered for ten years as a poet in residence at an inner-city school in Cleveland, Ohio to help children find their voice, writing grants so students could own books. I love playing with words and writing for children. From my experiences teaching and being with children in the inner-city as well as in my family, I know the power of stories is key to creating a strong bond--a connection between our hearts and minds-between storyteller and the story listener. Language and literacy go hand in hand.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

My debut picture book, Until Water Makes Mud: A Story of Refugee Children is coming in the summer of 2020. Earlier publications encompass articles, pre-school workbooks, and educational and adult nonfiction books including Love You More Than You Know: Mothers’ Stories About Sending Their Sons and Daughters to War (Gray & Co., Publishers, 2009, eBook 2012).

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Social Media

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

9 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Itika Gupta
Team

Hi Janie Reinart  Welcome to the Challenge Community!
Extremely fun read, loved how the invisible pup is the protagonist that takes the story and conversation further.
How might you evolve your manuscript to introduce new nudges of engagement and interaction for caregivers, to help them with their child’s learning development as they narrate the story? You can find some inspiration in the Final Toolkit and Challenge Resources listed on the challenge page

Photo of Janie Reinart
Team

Hello Itika,
Thank you. The art work is another part of engagement with a board book. Pictures of each of the places found when you lift the flap could continue the conversation. For example at the market the pictures of different foods could lead to more of the search and find theme--where are the bananas, find the apples, etc.

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