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Neighborhood Lullaby

A young child, ready for bed, observes the city outside her window in this unique counting book.

Photo of Anthony Fredericks

Written by

Neighborhood Lullaby

1

One

Goodnight, one school.

Goodnight, one tree.

Goodnight, neighborhood.

And, goodnight to me.

2

Two

Goodnight, two yards.

Where shadows creep.

Goodnight, two churches.

It’s time for sleep.

3

Three

Goodnight, three buses

With blue and red.

Goodnight, three cats.

I’m in my bed.

4

Four

Goodnight four birds

Across the moon.

Goodnight four police

I’ll see you soon.

5

Five

Goodnight, five squirrels.

Racing all around.

Goodnight, five trucks

With their chug-chug sound.

6

Six

Goodnight, six lights.

Goodnight far storm

Goodnight, six swings.

My room is warm.


7

Seven

Goodnight, seven bikes

Up and down the street.

Goodnight seven cars

And the boom-boom beat.

8

Eight

Goodnight, tall buildings.

Goodnight, eight clouds.

Goodnight, playground -

With the happy crowds.

9

Nine

Goodnight, nine drops

On my window pane.

Goodnight, nine shops

And the clickity-clack train.


10

Ten

Goodnight, ten cabs

Zipping here and there.

Goodnight, ten moths

In the summer air.

Goodnight to the world

And the city, too.

Goodnight, neighborhood

And, goodnight to YOU!

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

Children learn to count and to embrace the important things in both their city and their life.

Share your suggested book title

Neighborhood Lullaby

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Neighborhood Lullaby 1 One Goodnight, one school. Goodnight, one tree. Goodnight, neighborhood. And, goodnight to me. 2 Two Goodnight, two yards. Where shadows creep. Goodnight, two churches. It’s time for sleep. 3 Three Goodnight, three buses With blue and red. Goodnight, three cats. I’m in my bed. 4 Four Goodnight four birds Across the moon. Goodnight four police I’ll see you soon. 5 Five Goodnight, five squirrels. Racing all around. Goodnight, five trucks With their chug-chug sound. 6 Six Goodnight, six lights. Goodnight far storm Goodnight, six swings. My room is warm.   7 Seven Goodnight, seven bikes Up and down the street. Goodnight seven cars And the boom-boom beat. 8 Eight Goodnight, tall buildings. Goodnight, eight clouds. Goodnight, playground - With the happy crowds. 9 Nine Goodnight, nine drops On my window pane. Goodnight, nine shops And the clickity-clack train.   10 Ten Goodnight, ten cabs Zipping here and there. Goodnight, ten moths In the summer air. Goodnight to the world And the city, too. Goodnight, neighborhood And, goodnight to YOU!

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

Decades of research have supported the notion that language learning is both an integrative process as well as a personal one. Most literacy learning comes, not from formal education, but rather from a child's experiences with language in all its forms. When that learning is early, constant, and supportive it can impact a child's life tremendously. When it taps into the background knowledge of youngsters (e.g. familiarity with one's environment) it is long-lasting. The following beliefs are integrated into the text of this book: 1. Language learning is a natural process. 2. Parents are a child's fist, and most important, teachers. 3. The conditions for becoming oral language users are the same for beginning readers. 4. Optimal literacy environments are based on both cognitive and affective support. 5. Becoming literate is a social act and a search for meaning.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I have traveled to Philly on many occasions for both professional and personal reasons. My daughter was a student at The University of the Arts and we have enjoyed many visits to city center Philadelphia. And, who can argue with some of the most eclectic and diverse restaurants to be found anywhere?

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

Children will learn to appreciate those elements of urban life right outside their window. Common elements (Septa buses, commuter trains, playground crowds, cops on the beat, churches, homes, and shops) are a unique mix in many Philadelphia neighborhoods.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

Pennsylvania

Location: City

York

Website URL (optional question)

www.anthonydfredericks.com

Tell us more about you / your team

I have been a professional educator for nearly 50 years (now retired0. I have taught at the elementary, secondary, and (most recently) college levels. I have authored numerous books for teachers focused primarily on the intersection of language and content areas. I am also an award-winning children's author (~50 books) with an emphasis on nature, environments, and animals). I strive to open reader's eyes to the incredible world around them through dynamic and engaging text. My volunteer work has included numerous urban initiatives in York, PA. I am co-director of York's "LEAP into Science" program (a Franklin Institute project), an active participant in several York city literacy programs, a volunteer storyteller in many York City schools, and an active promoter of the York County Library System.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

I believe the visuals in this book are embodied in the "concreteness" of its words.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

A few select children's books: Tall Tall Tree Desert Night, Desert Day Under One Rock A is for Anaconda The Tsunami Quilt Mountain Night, Mountain Day Near One Cattail

Do you have an agent?

  • Yes

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • OpenIDEO announcement email

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

11 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Itika Gupta
Team

Hi Anthony Fredericks  Welcome to the Challenge Community!
Ideal bedtime story that's engaging while teaching children numbers. Love it.
How might you evolve your manuscript to introduce new nudges of engagement and interaction for caregivers, to help them with their child’s learning development as they narrate the story? You can find some inspiration in the Final Toolkit and Challenge Resources listed on the challenge page

Photo of Anthony Fredericks
Team

Itika:
Thanks so much for your response and your interest in this manuscript. Since this is envisioned as a 32-page book, I plan to use the final two pages for ideas and suggestions geared specifically for parents and caregivers. For example, page 31 would be a letter to adults ("Dear Parent/Caregiver/Grandparent: As you may know, reading to your child is one of the most important things you can do for her/him as they begin to learn about the world. Each time you read a story you are introducing a child to the wonder and magic of language and the wonder and magic of books. [More]"). Page 32 would include a selection of tips and strategies to expand the story into other aspects of a child's life. For Example: "How to Get the Most Out of 'Neighborhood Lullaby" - 1. Invite your child to select one of the numbers in the book. Go for a walk through your neighborhood and locate that number of items (For example: three cats, three rocks, three cars, etc.). 2. Identify one of the items pictured in the book (e.g. moths, churches, swings) and help your child locate that item in her/his own community ("Oh, look, there's a church just like in the ones in the book we read last night!")" [More]).
These additions would be a critical and important element in the success of the book as a learning tool for any family.

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