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My Window

A view of a child's world and the cultural highlights of a city as seen through a window.

Photo of Jodie Parachini
7 4

Written by

 

This is my window.

From here I can see the world. 

 

Up window, down window

City window, town window 

Low window, high window

Your window, my window

 

When I look up, I see the sky.

Airplanes soaring through the clouds.

Far above the birds. 

 

Outside, there are cars.

Beeping, vrooming, whirring past.

So many colors!

 

Near window, far window

Bus window, car window 

Low window, high window

Your window, my window

 

People strolling, people running.

I wonder where they are going. 

To school? To jobs?

 

Some are walking dogs to the park. 

Hello doggies!

Have fun playing in the grass!

 

Big window, small window

Short window, tall window 

Low window, high window

Your window, my window

 

Outside my window there are buildings shaped like blocks.

Tall and short. Thin and wide.

Some are round. Some are square. 

 

There are people in those windows, too!

Young and old.

That one looks like me!

 

New window, old window

Warm window, cold window 

Low window, high window

Your window, my window

 

Sometimes out my window

all I see is rain—

shiny rivers run down the glass. 

 

Sometimes I can’t see anything at all.

But I know the world is there. 

 

Sun window, cloud window

Quiet window, loud window 

Low window, high window

Your window, my window

 

At nighttime, the view from my window fades.

At first it is dark, but then…

 

[all the windows in the cityscape are lit up]

 

Dark window, night window

Glow window, light window 

Hush window, bye window

Your window, my window.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

Studies have shown that “in the early years, a child’s rhyme awareness is predictive of the ease with which they will learn to read.” (Dr Sarah Kuppen, https://www.booktrust.org.uk/news-and-features/features/2018/november/rhymes-in-early-childhood/) It is my hope that this manuscript not only helps to build social-emotional awareness in children, but also a greater love and appreciation for language and stories.

Share your suggested book title

My Window

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

This is my window. From here I can see the world. Up window, down window City window, town window Low window, high window Your window, my window When I look up, I see the sky. Airplanes soaring through the clouds. Far above the birds. Outside, there are cars. Beeping, vrooming, whirring past. So many colors! Near window, far window Bus window, car window Low window, high window Your window, my window People strolling, people running. I wonder where they are going. To school? To jobs? Some are walking dogs to the park. Hello doggies! Have fun playing in the grass! Big window, small window Short window, tall window Low window, high window Your window, my window Outside my window there are buildings shaped like blocks. Tall and short. Thin and wide. Some are round. Some are square. There are people in those windows, too! Young and old. That one looks like me! New window, old window Warm window, cold window Low window, high window Your window, my window Sometimes out my window all I see is rain— shiny rivers run down the glass. Sometimes I can’t see anything at all. But I know the world is there. Sun window, cloud window Quiet window, loud window Low window, high window Your window, my window At nighttime, the view from my window fades. At first it is dark, but then… [all the windows in the cityscape are lit up] Dark window, night window Glow window, light window Hush window, bye window Your window, my window.

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

As Alison Gopnik states, “babies are designed to learn.” As caregivers, we are tasked with an enormous responsibility, but one that is eminently doable, if we are given the right tools. Books provide gateways to immensely positive interactions between carer and child. Increased language development is a primary benefit from this “dynamic engagement” (Saloni Krishnan and Mark H Johnson, https://www.booktrust.org.uk) and one that is critical if we are going to stem the educational and discriminatory divide created by the lack of this engagement. This manuscript uses repetitive and sensory language to help develop early literacy, based on Tier 1 and 2 English vocabulary. The concept of active interplay between words and pictures allows the carer to continuously ask questions of a “What do you see?” nature. The illustrations will allow a multitude of skin colors, community activities, and cultures to be represented, without focusing on a single ethnic or racial group.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I have visited many times and still have friends who reside there.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

Be it in a tower block or taxi cab, windows provide a ubiquitous and metaphoric symbol of city life. All of the experiences contained within the story play out on city streets, but are viewed from the confines of a warm and nurturing interior. Since the story’s perspective is that of a child staring OUT of a window, the main character is never described or visualized, allowing ALL children to associate with the experiences of the character.

Location: Country

United Kingdom

Location: State or Department

Hertfordshire

Location: City

Harpenden

Tell us more about you / your team

I am an American author of picture books, currently living in merry old England. I run my own editorial business with a diverse set of clients, from museums and galleries to book publishers and magazines. As a volunteer librarian and former reading instructor, I have seen the impact that reading can have on children’s educational success, and I currently strive to advance literacy and creativity in children by giving presentations and workshops at primary (elementary) schools.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

These three illustrations, from Last Stop on Market Street (illo. by Christian Robinson), Trombone Shorty (Bryan Collier), and Windows (E. B. Goodale) give the playful perspective of city life with uplifting and captivating images and strong visual impact.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

Half a Giraffe? (Albert Whitman, 2018) This Is a Serious Book (Greenwillow Books [HarperCollins], 2017) The Perfect Job for an Elephant (QEB, 2015) The Snake Who Said Shhh (QEB, 2014)

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Someone in my network (word of mouth)

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

7 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Itika Gupta
Team

Hi Jodie Parachini  Welcome to the Challenge Community!
It's amazing how your story has created an entire cityscape through just the little window.
How might you evolve your manuscript to introduce new nudges of engagement and interaction for caregivers, to help them with their child’s learning development as they narrate the story? You can find some inspiration in the Final Toolkit and Challenge Resources listed on the challenge page

Photo of Jodie Parachini
Team

Thank you! I'll review those now.

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