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I Love You. I Love You. I Love You.

Three small, yet important, words that fill children with security and feeds their imagination as they move throughout their very busy days.

Photo of Anne Sawan
7 4

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I love you.

I love you.

I love you.


I can sing it out real loud.

I can whisper it so low.

I can chant it. I can hum it.

I can tap it with my toe.

 

I can quack it like a duck.

I can croak it like a frog.

I can purr it like a cat.

I can bark it like a dog.


I can say it in Chinese,

and the way they do in France.

I can shout it out in Spanish

while I do a salsa dance.


I can write it with blue chalk.

I can spell it with one hand.

I can bang it on a drum

in my Grandpa’s reggae band.


I can doodle it with my dinner,

noodles and green peas,

I can scribble it in the bathtub

while I scrub my dirty knees.  


I can use my brand new paintbrushes,

glitter, scissors and some glue

and make a great big sign,

with the letters, I.L.O.V.E.Y.O. and U.    


I can hitch it to my spaceship

and fly it way up to the stars,

zipping in and out,

past Jupiter and Mars.


I can give it to a Martian

with one purple, wobbly, eye,

then fly straight back to my bed

and watch him zoom it ‘cross the sky.


I can hear it in my head,

but I hold it in my heart

for those times when we’re together

and those times when we’re apart.

 

I love you.

I love you.

I love you.

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

"I Love You, I Love You, I Love You" is a 250 word, picture book for children, ages 0-3, that includes multiple references to other cultures and languages such as Spanish, Chinese, French and Sign Language, while showing the many ways that children find to hold onto and integrate these special words into their everyday lives. This book and its universal message of I love you is perfect for all families regardless of structure, culture or sexual orientation.

Share your suggested book title

I Love You. I Love You. I Love You.

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

I love you. I love you. I love you. I can sing it out real loud. I can whisper it so low. I can chant it. I can hum it. I can tap it with my toe. I can quack it like a duck. I can croak it like a frog. I can purr it like a cat. I can bark it like a dog. I can say it in Chinese, and the way they do in France. I can shout it out in Spanish while I do a salsa dance. I can write it with blue chalk. I can spell it with one hand. I can bang it on a drum in my Grandpa’s reggae band. I can doodle it with my dinner, noodles and green peas, I can scribble it in the bathtub while I scrub my dirty knees. I can use my brand new paintbrushes, glitter, scissors and some glue and make a great big sign, with the letters, I.L.O.V.E.Y.O. and U. I can hitch it to my spaceship and fly it way up to the stars, zipping in and out, past Jupiter and Mars. I can give it to a Martian with a purple, wobbly, eye, then fly straight back to my bed and watch him zoom it ‘cross the sky. I can hear it in my head, but I hold it in my heart for those times when we’re together and those times when we’re apart. I love you. I love you. I love you.

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

Early childhood research shows that caregivers need to read frequently to children to increase their vocabulary as well as to build a positive sense of self and community. Children benefit greatly from seeing their life experience reflected back to them through books and other media. This book, I Love You, I Love You, I Love You, attracts children through the use of rhyme. It then engages the child’s imagination and uses both easy to understand basic tier one vocabulary as well as building in more complex words that will help to build their vocabulary. The book's structure is open to a wide array of possible illustrations that could depict a child’s imagination and portray a variety of families and various living environments. (http://talkingisteaching.org, https://app.coxcampus.org/#!/courses/595165522e09ce1c0041b7ce)

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I really have no familiarity with Philadelphia however I am familiar with urban living in the Boston/Massachusetts area.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

Children hear these three special words then integrate them into their minds and into their busy days and imaginations and feel empowered to go out and engage with their world in positive ways. I hope that this manuscript shows how the words, I love you, are important in every child’s life regardless of culture, family structure, urban or non urban living. Every child needs to hear, I love you, and every loving caregiver loves to have multiple opportunities to tell their child how much they are loved.

Location: Country

USA

Location: State or Department

Massachusetts

Location: City

Medfield

Tell us more about you / your team

My name is Anne Cavanaugh Sawan. I am married and a mother to five children, four biological and one adopted. I am a psychologist and also a writer. I spent many years working with diverse families in urban communities who were facing very difficult situations, i.e. financial, immigration issues, family stress, etc. Over the years I have come to value the undeniable importance of giving a child a basic, stable sense of self as well as the clear message that they are loved. When this foundation of love is internalized, a child can weather many storms.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

My picture book, "What Can Your Grandmother Do?" won the International Picture Book Contest held by Inclusive Works in 2014, and was released through Clavis Publishing. My short story, The Lunch Table, was published in Chicken Soup: Inspiration for Teachers. I had several ebooks on MeeGenius App: When Santa Was Small, The Baseball Game, The Great Adventure Brothers, and The Halloween Costume,and some of my adult writing has been featured on Brain-Child, Bluntmoms, Scary Mommy, Adoptive Families.

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Someone in my network (word of mouth)

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

7 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Spam
Photo of Dawnnbooks .
Team

Wow even the Martians made in there. Nice story.

Spam
Photo of Anne Sawan
Team

Thank you!

Spam
Photo of Itika Gupta
Team

Hi Anne Sawan   welcome to the Challenge Community!
You have a very warm story with all that love in so many metaphors and forms, extremely fun.
How might you evolve your manuscript to make it more conversational between the caregiver and child through literacy development questions that the caregiver can ask as a part of the story?

Spam
Photo of Anne Sawan
Team

Hi Itika. Thank you for reading and commenting on my story. In response to your question I see the story as having a lot of potential for interaction between caregivers and children because the words, "I Love You' are so universal. For example, they might sound out the beat of "I love you" by clapping or using their feet. They could learn to sign it together using ASL or single hand symbols. They might say it, sing it or sign it in their own native language or be silly and meow it like a cat or paint a picture of it together. Just a few ideas!

Spam
Photo of Shondra M. Quarles
Team

Feeling the LOVE!

Spam
Photo of Anuja Singhal
Team

This is so beautiful! And I would personally love to read this to my son. Thanks for sharing!

Spam
Photo of Anne Sawan
Team

Thank you, Anuja!