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Hudson and the Train

Hudson finally makes it to the giant market to see the train, only to find lots of distractions - will Hudson remember the train?

Photo of Valerie Wallace
2 0

Written by

About one line per page....


Hudson jumped out of bed. Today we go see the train!

Hudson ate breakfast.

Hudson got dressed.


Hudson walked down the seven stairs.

Hudson walked down the long block.
Hudson also ran a little bit.

Hudson was very excited.

Hudson was very patient.


Finally, Hudson got on the bus.

Hudson stood on the seat to look out the window.

Then Hudson got worried. Hudson thought,

What if they forgot to get off the bus?

Hudson rang the bell to stop the bus.


Hudson wanted to jump over everyone.

Inside,

there was so much to see

Tulips blooming in a bouquet

and smell

Fresh bread baking

and taste

Yummy honey 

and touch

Smooth soap

and hear

So many people saying Hello!

(the following list is to guide the illustrations as various signage, lables, apron decals, etc. for the "people" Hudson meets who say Hello).

  • Epp’s Eggs and Cheese
  • Phan’s Flowers
  • Harris Honey
  • Perez Breads
  • Soto Soaps
  • Murphy Meats
  • Lee’s Vegetables
  • Russo’s Fruits
  • Klein Cookware
  • Lange’s Lollipops
  • Brooks’ Books
  • Doukas Soups


Hudson almost forgot about the train.


Hudson had to visit the bathroom.


Hudson remembered about the train.

Hudson looked right. Hudson looked left.

Hudson almost walked right by it!

Hudson sang a little train song as he walked around to see the engine in the front, 

the cars behind the engine, 

and the little town.

The train was small.

In fact it was very small.

It was just the right size

for Hudson to see


everything.

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

My vision is that this story delights young readers and caregivers and that they will be drawn easily into interaction with each other through the storyline, locations, and main character. I also intend for this story to be unique, and for whoever illustrates it to be inspired.

Share your suggested book title

Hudson and the Train

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Hudson and the Train Hudson jumped out of bed. Today we go see the train! Hudson ate breakfast. Hudson got dressed. Hudson walked down the seven stairs. Hudson walked down the long block. Hudson also ran a little bit. Hudson was very excited. Hudson was very patient. Finally, Hudson got on the bus. Hudson stood on the seat to look out the window. Then Hudson got worried. Hudson thought, What if they forgot to get off the bus? Hudson rang the bell to stop the bus. Hudson wanted to jump over everyone. Inside, there was so much to see Tulips blooming in a bouquet and smell Fresh bread baking and taste Yummy honey and touch Smooth soap and hear So many people saying Hello! (the following list is to guide the illustrations as various signage, lables, apron decals, etc. for the "people" Hudson meets who say Hello). Epp’s Eggs and Cheese Phan’s Flowers Harris Honey Perez Breads Soto Soaps Murphy Meats Lee’s Vegetables Russo’s Fruits Klein Cookware Lange’s Lollipops Brooks’ Books Doukas Soups Hudson almost forgot about the train. Hudson had to visit the bathroom. Hudson remembered about the train. Hudson looked right. Hudson looked left. Hudson almost walked right by it! Hudson sang a little train song as he walked around to see the engine in the front, the cars behind the engine, and the little town. The train was small. In fact it was very small. It was just the right size for Hudson to see everything.

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

This manuscript employs Tier 1 and a few Tier 2 words, provides multiple opportunities for interaction, including counting, "where is ....", etc., makes use of alliteration and internal rhyme, has an appropriately-aged and active main character, as well as an unseen but present caregiver, all inside a compelling story to read again and again and always find new things to see and talk about. I watched all the videos and read several of the articles in the provided resources to help me develop the text and story line to be sensory, interactive, and engaging. I also looked through lists online of tier 1 and tier 2 words. I also drew upon my technical knowledge of wordplay and poetry, spoke with caregivers and librarians about "favorite" books for ages 1-3, and watched my stepson read with my grandson, now age 2. I also brought home about 20 of these "favorites" from the library and analyzed them for story line, elements of language and wordplay, tiered words, and interactivity.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I've been to Philadelphia several times to see dear friends, who have taken me on many walks and excursions all over the city, including to the inspiration for this story, Reading Market.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

My readers will experience an urban environment in several ways (leaving a home with stairs, walking down a block, taking the bus, being in a crowd), and with a quest that goes beyond the intended journey to find lots of diverse friends who are working and cooperating in a large farmer's-style urban market. I want the caregivers and children who read this book to see themselves in it, and find something new in it every time they go through it. I want the book to be positive about the cultural and ethnic diversity of, and opportunities in, urban life.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

Illinois

Location: City

Chicago

Website URL (optional question)

http://valeriewallace.net/

Tell us more about you / your team

I'm an award-winning poet who is lucky to live in one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the United States. I prioritize language as fun and diversity as aspirational and normalized.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

In my mind, Hudson is a hamster and interacts with all kinds of other animals. I'm open to non-animal illustration, but because I chose a name for my character that could be a boy's name or a girl's name, perhaps animals make more sense. I had in mind Denys Cazet because his illustrations have humor, nuance, and amplify the story, as well as have a well-defined sense of place through detail and textual/visual "asides". Sandra Boynton's silly, adorable, & frisky animals were also an influence.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

House of McQueen The Dictators' Guide to Good Housekeeping Various poems and prose pieces

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • OpenIDEO announcement email

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

2 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Spam
Photo of Dawnnbooks .
Team

This captures the short attention span of the little ones at that age.
Interesting way to introduce so many things.

Spam
Photo of Valerie Wallace
Team

Thank you! I found even in a short collection of words, Hudson's character was able to emerge.