OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign Up / Login or Learn more

Good Morning, City!

A curious puppy explores her urban environment, prompting her to ask thoughtful questions about her surroundings.

Photo of Andrea Heffner
3 1

Written by

It is morning. Woof! Woof! Let’s go for a walk.

Down the elevator.

I see my neighbor. Will she pet me?

Out the door.

I see a bus. Where is it going?

Cross the street.

I see the bodega. Who is shopping?

Up the sidewalk.

I see the park. Who is playing?

Over the grass.

I see the police station. Who needs help?

Down the sidewalk.

I see the subway. Who is on the train?

Under the bridge.

I see the mural. What colors are there?

Over the grass.

I see the museum. What is inside?

Up the path.

I see the library. How many books are in there?

Cross the street.

I see the school. Where are the children?

Down the path.

I see a food truck. What are people eating?

Up the street.

I see my building. Is it time to go home?

Through the door.

I see the custodian. Will he pet me?

Up the elevator.

Into bed. Time for a nap! Woof!

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

GOOD MORNING, CITY! engages children and provides their caregivers a way to interact with their child with illustrations of places they recognize and people they relate to, and with the text that supports early language development.

Share your suggested book title

Good Morning, City!

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

GOOD MORNING, CITY! It is morning. Woof! Woof! Let’s go for a walk. Down the elevator. I see my neighbor. Will she pet me? Out the door. I see a bus. Where is it going? Cross the street. I see the bodega. Who is shopping? Up the sidewalk. I see the park. Who is playing? Over the grass. I see the police station. Who needs help? Down the sidewalk. I see the subway. Who is on the train? Under the bridge. I see the mural. What colors are there? Over the grass. I see the museum. What is inside? Up the path. I see the library. How many books are in there? Cross the street. I see the school. Where are the children? Down the path. I see a food truck. What are people eating? Up the street. I see my building. Is it time to go home? Through the door. I see the custodian. Will he pet me? Up the elevator. Into bed. Time for a nap! Woof!

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

As an elementary educator, I used my teaching experience and knowledge of early childhood literacy to craft my story. Children’s books are most engaging and effective when the text and illustrations complement each other. It is especially important for the illustrations to be narrative in nature and depict the story for pre-readers. I created a storyboard of my manuscript and a dummy to see how it would flow and intentionally left my text open-ended so that diversity within an urban setting could be the focus. I read the challenge brief, utilized the recommended resources, and read the challenge personas. I included Tier 1 Basic Terms and the following Superclusters: 2: Pronouns (Pronouns/Reflexive Pronouns, Interrogative Pronouns, Relative Pronouns, Indefinite/Interrogative Adverbs), 4: Physical Location and Orientation, 32: Categories of People, 28: Movement and Action, 29: Structures and Buildings, 52: Occupations, 38: Locations and Places Where People Live, 16: Vehicles and Tra

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

I live in Philadelphia. This book is based on my walks with my puppy and the interactions we have with our neighbors and the places we see along the way.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

I made the main character in my story a curious, childlike puppy because it allows for children from diverse backgrounds to see themselves as the puppy. Many children don’t see themselves reflected in the books they read. My goal was to create a story where the readers feel connected to the book and relate to the images and text in a personal way. The illustrations would further support the text depicting people with many different skin tones and ethnicities. I used the puppy’s walk as the vehicle to introduce familiar city spots and terms to the reader. The open-ended questions will invite conversation between the caregivers reading the story and their children.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

Pennsylvania

Location: City

Philadelphia

Website URL (optional question)

www.andreagheffner.com

Tell us more about you / your team

I am a writer, artist, and educator living in Philadelphia. I write stories and create art that I hope inspires and brings joy to others. I love when people connect personally with something I have created. I am a member of SCBWI and the 12x12 Picture Book Challenge. My background is in education and I have over 10 years of experience teaching children in Kindergarten through 5th grade in urban, suburban, and rural environments.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

The illustrations for this story would be colorful, vibrant, and narrative. I would expect many cityscape scenes as well as people with different skin tones, a wide range of ages, people from different ethnicities, and people from diverse economic backgrounds represented.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • No

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Someone in my network (word of mouth)

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

3 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Ashanti Antonio Prescott
Team

Very good effort. Good way of to create caregiver and child interaction. I do not know whether you experimented with grouping some of the areas together to reduce the overall number of questions, hence getting opportunity to create some rhymes and maybe some repetition in the story line
Regards

View all comments