OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign Up / Login or Learn more

Can you carry me?

This book initiates communication between caregivers and children & helps children cope with frustration and learn to ask questions.

Photo of Peeriya Pongsarigun
4 0

Written by

Page 1

(picture of the parents carrying Coda)


Pages 2-3

“Can you carry me, Papa?”

“Maybe not.”

“Can you carry me, Mama?”

“Not now.”


Pages 4-5

“Can you carry me, Grandma?”

“Sorry, my back hurts.”

“Can you carry me, Grandpa?”

“But you’re so good at walking.”


Pages 6-7

“Why do you carry Coda?”

“Why don’t you carry me, Mama, Papa, Grandpa, Grandma?”

“You’re a big girl honey.”

“And big girls don’t need to be carried.”


Pages 8-9

“I want to be in your arms, too.”

“Why CAN’T I have you?”


Pages 10-11

“Aww, let me give you a hug, honey.”

“You always have us--you see?”


Pages 12-13

 “I DON’T want to share you with Coda.”

“Come carry me, Mama.”


Pages 14-15

“Come on! Catch up.”

“Muah! I love you.”

“Can you love me only, Mama?”

“I love you both, my babies.”

“Can you NOT love Coda?”


Pages 16-17

“But Coda loves you, Big sister.”

“Do you want to try holding your brother?”

“No.”


Pages 18-19

“Waa Waa!”

“What do we do, Mama?”

“Waa Waa!”

“There there, Coda.”

“Waa Waa!”

“What do we do, Papa?”

“Waa Waa!”

“There there, Coda.”


Pages 20-21

“Waa Waa!”

...

“Waa Waa!”

...

“Waa Waa!”

 “There there, Coda.”


Pages 22-23

“Wow! Coda is smiling.”

“We’re so proud of you, darling.”


Pages 24

“Do you want to carry Coda?

“May as well, Papa.”

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

This book seeks to help children discover who they are, their social and familial roles, and give them self-esteem by showing that independence or even rejection from caregivers does not mean the loss of support, love, and care. The book also helps care-givers bond with children by initiating conversations about the characters or the experience the children might have to develop strong, positive relationships to help both children and caregivers develop trust, empathy, and compassion.

Share your suggested book title

Can you carry me?

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Page 1 (picture of the parents carrying Coda) Pages 2-3 “Can you carry me, Papa?” “Maybe not.” “Can you carry me, Mama?” “Not now.” Pages 4-5 “Can you carry me, Grandma?” “Sorry, my back hurts.” “Can you carry me, Grandpa?” “But you’re so good at walking.” Pages 6-7 “Why do you carry Coda?” “Why don’t you carry me, Mama, Papa, Grandpa, Grandma?” “You’re a big girl honey.” “And big girls don’t need to be carried.” Pages 8-9 “I want to be in your arms, too.” “Why CAN’T I have you?” Pages 10-11 “Aww, let me give you a hug, honey.” “You always have us--you see?” Pages 12-13 “I DON’T want to share you with Coda.” “Come carry me, Mama.” Pages 14-15 “Come on! Catch up.” “Muah! I love you.” “Can you love me only, Mama?” “I love you both, my babies.” “Can you NOT love Coda?” Pages 16-17 “But Coda loves you, Big sister.” “Do you want to try holding your brother?” “No.” Pages 18-19 “Waa Waa!” “What do we do, Mama?” “Waa Waa!” “There there, Coda.” “Waa Waa!” “What do we do, Papa?” “Waa Waa!” “There there, Coda.” Pages 20-21 “Waa Waa!” ... “Waa Waa!” ... “Waa Waa!” “There there, Coda.” Pages 22-23 “Wow! Coda is smiling.” “We’re so proud of you, darling.” Pages 24 “Do you want to carry Coda? “May as well, Papa.”

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

This book aims to help create strong, loving relationships between children and caregivers and support language development in a child through reading. 2-3 year-old children start to talk and learn who they are in the family and communication with caregivers will help them build identity and self-esteem. Caregivers can read this book with children and encourage them to ask and answer questions, for example, how each character feel and if children ever feel the same way. Moreover, the story helps children cope with one of the first rejections they experience in life. Children will learn to calm down, deal with their feelings while still feeling loved and supported. The book also enhances knowledge of basic vocabulary terms in Tier 1 especially the caring and trusting cluster (love and want), which emphasizes the vision of this book, to help create loving relationships between children and caretakers through reading.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

Peeriya has lived in Philadelphia for 8 months. She attended a story-telling session organized by WHYY and realized how African-American people suffer from discrimination and inequality. She also took children’s literature courses at the University of Pennsylvania and learned that there are few children’s books which reflect and represent the lives of African-Americans, Asians, and interracial kids. Peeriya has been working with John for almost a decade and each of us adds the strengths and values of our own cultures to write and translate books. Therefore, we’d like to see more interracial families in children’s books because it represents a great opportunity to reach a wider audience.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

We have crafted this manuscript to reflect many urban realities, from the vision of our characters being part of a multi-generational and multi-racial family to the simple act of walking together, portray a unique slice of the urban experience. The benefits we hope to create is the whole family and children feel relatable to the story and can use this book to initiate communication in the family and help children understand that when things don’t go as expected, having a conversation about what would be a way of figuring things out. At the same time, we allow caretakers to ‘breathe’ while letting children deal with their own emotions as well.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

Pennsylvania

Location: City

Philadelphia

Website URL (optional question)

https://interthai1.wordpress.com/

Tell us more about you / your team

We are John Viano, an American living in Bangkok, Thailand, and Peeriya Pongsarigun, a Thai Fulbright Teaching Assistant, working at Penn. We have written 3 books which were published in Thailand and we have translated about a hundred children’s books from Thai to English. Particularly in this work, we prioritize not teaching children what to do in the typical didactic way of “do what I say.” Instead, we let the protagonist handle her frustration but we also gave her reassurance that her caregivers loved her anyway. Moreover, we do not want parents to jump in and tell the protagonist what she should do. Instead we made her watch what her parents had done and have freedom to decide what she should do. We believe when children are secure of their caretakers’ support, they will choose to do the (mostly) right things. Peeriya is studying with Prof. Lorene Cary and had a chance to read the first draft of “Can you carry me?” to pre-K schoolers at the Formative Years Preschool in PA.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

We’d like to see acrylic pictures that reflect the characters like those in The Snowy Day. However, we want the book to portray a mixed-race family life in an urban setting, so we want the illustrations to be more lifelike to reflect the characteristics of each character.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

Pongsarigun, Peeriya, and John Viano. The Provincial Slogan Treasure Hunt Series. Satapornbooks, 2018. Phonchindarak, Saowapha, et al. Little Bear Series. Translated by John Viano and Peeriya Pongsarigun, Happy Parenting, 2018. Phonchindarak, Saowapha, and Na-ru. Raan and Tan-tan Series. Translated by John Viano and Peeriya Pongsarigun, Happy Parenting, 2017. *All of them were published in Thailand.

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Prof. Lorene Cary emailed Peeriya about the Challenge.

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

4 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Ashanti Antonio Prescott
Team

Quite interesting story line. Indeed it is rich in caregiver and child interaction.

View all comments