OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign Up / Login or Learn more

BUTTON RUN

Aasha’s button pops off and rolls away as she and Oba head to the library, and the two end up on a wild chase through their neighborhood.

Photo of Anna Forrester
9 2

Written by

  1. BUTTON RUN

(Illustration notes appear in parentheses.)


 (Oba and Aasha get ready to head out of house/apartment to go to library.)

“It’s library day!”


Oba packs.

Aasha snacks.

“Let’s go get some books!”


(On stoop/porch)

Oba grins.

Aasha spins.

“Watch me, Oba -- look!”

 

“POP!” (Aasha’s button falls off.)

 

Button bounces.

Aasha pounces.

“Button rolled away!”


Button skips.

Aasha trips.

“Oba, I’m okay!”


Aasha chases.

Oba races.

Down the street they run.


Button hops

Aasha stops –

as Squirrel joins the fun! (Squirrel catches button.)


Squirrel grabs.

Squirrel jabs.

Squirrel paws the ground.


Oba cries, “No!”

Aasha chides, “Go!”

Kitten makes no sound. (Kitten creeps towards squirrel)


Kitten growls.

Kitten howls.

Squirrel runs up a tree.


Oba stares.

Aasha glares,

“Give button back to me!”

 

Kitten paws.

Kitten claws.

Crow watches him play.

Kitten jumps

button bumps --

and Button’s on its way!


Oba dashes.

Aasha splashes. (in puddle)

Button hops a crack.


Aasha drags.

Oba lags.

“Won’t you please come back?”


Crow gawks.

Crow squawks

-- and rises from her nest.


Crow plunges.

Oba lunges.

Oba reaches.

Crow screeches!

Aasha shouts,

“Oh -- watch out! (crow grabs button and lifts off)

“Isn’t crow a pest?!”


Crow swoops.

Crow loops.

Crow dives to the ground.


Oba stands.

Crow lands. (In front of building with signs that reads: FREE LIBRARY OF PHILADELPHIA and OPEN.)

Crow sets button down.

 

Crow flies.

Aasha sighs.

“Crow brought button back!”


Asha laughs.

Oba smiles.

“Our day is back on track!”


(They enter library, snuggle up with a book.)


(187 words)

 

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

A romp through a city neighborhood, BUTTON RUN captures the magic and fun of everyday outings and the joy of playful language.

Share your suggested book title

BUTTON RUN

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

BUTTON RUN (Illustration notes appear in parentheses.) (Oba and Aasha get ready to head out of house/apartment to go to library.) “It’s library day!” Oba packs. Aasha snacks. “Let’s go get some books!” (On stoop/porch) Oba grins. Aasha spins. “Watch me, Oba -- look!” “POP!” (Aasha’s button falls off.) Button bounces. Aasha pounces. “Button rolled away!” Button skips. Aasha trips. “Oba, I’m okay!” Aasha chases. Oba races. Down the street they run. Button hops Aasha stops – as Squirrel joins the fun! (Squirrel catches button.) Squirrel grabs. Squirrel jabs. Squirrel paws the ground. Oba cries, “No!” Aasha chides, “Go!” Kitten makes no sound. (Kitten creeps towards squirrel) Kitten growls. Kitten howls. Squirrel runs up a tree. Oba stares. Aasha glares, “Give button back to me!” Kitten paws. Kitten claws. Crow watches him play. Kitten jumps button bumps -- and Button’s on its way! Oba dashes. Aasha splashes. (in puddle) Button hops a crack. Aasha drags. Oba lags. “Won’t you please come back?” Crow gawks. Crow squawks -- and rises from her nest. Crow plunges. Oba lunges. Oba reaches. Crow screeches! Aasha shouts, “Oh -- watch out! (crow grabs button and lifts off) “Isn’t crow a pest?!” Crow swoops. Crow loops. Crow dives to the ground. Oba stands. Crow lands. (In front of building with signs that reads: FREE LIBRARY OF PHILADELPHIA and OPEN.) Crow sets button down. Crow flies. Aasha sighs. “Crow brought button back!” Asha laughs. Oba smiles. “Our day is back on track!” (They enter library, snuggle up with a book.) (187 words)

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

BUTTON RUN’s short, simple, declarative sentences are full of active verbs and sensory language targeted to 0-to-3’s. Tier 1 vocabulary plus a smattering of Tier 2 words form lots of rhyming pairs in a tight, predictable rhyme structure that gives the story a jaunty pace and creates lots of opportunity for children to predict, chime in and narrate along with their reader. The text’s focus on action and dialogue leaves room for illustrations to fill out visual details that can set up additional opportunities for naming, labeling, counting, etc. The story’s action -- navigating the neighborhood with a caregiver, losing things, chasing things, watching animals, and going to the library – will likely be familiar to its target audience, as will the story’s neighborhood setting, making BUTTON RUN and, by extension, its language relatable.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

A Philadelphia resident for over 20 years, I am raising two children here; we do a lot of exploring! For eight years I’ve also served on the board of Smith Memorial Playhouse and Playground, where children and families from every Philadelphia zip code come together to enjoy free, unstructured play in Fairmount Park -- and where kids and their caregivers play, chat and rub elbows with an amazing diversity of families. In my work as a landscape architect, too, I’ve worked with numerous area elementary school and pre-school communities creating landscapes for play and learning.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

I want BUTTON RUN to be a mirror for Philadelphia's youngest residents and for them to see themselves in Aasha and her day: spending time with a grandparent; crossing paths with a stray cat, a busy squirrel, or a bothersome crow; or visiting one of Philadelphia's more than 50 branch libraries. City life involves walking and taking public transit to get around, and while a jaunt to the store or library may feel like old hat to adult caregivers, for young children, every outing offers new experiences, great discoveries, and adventure. I hope the story -- with its playful energy and everyday magic -- will be fun for adults to read too, and remind them how joyful words and stories can be.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

PA

Location: City

Philadelphia

Website URL (optional question)

www.annaforrester.com

Tell us more about you / your team

I’ve been writing children’s books for about five years. Since earning my MS in Early Childhood Education at Bank Street College, I have worked in the early childhood and education fields in various capacities: as a Kindergarten and 2nd grade teacher, a coordinator of an after school program for families experiencing homelessness, a school gardens coordinator in NYC Parks’ GreenThumb Program, a landscape architect designing spaces for play and learning, and a children’s book author.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

I love the balance of the energy of the city with the intimacy of the more personal moments depicted in these illustrations. Rashin Kheiriyeh's work is especially compelling to me, both for the way that her illustrations hint at the magical, and for how the limited palette and great use of white space make it easier for my eye to focus on all her beautiful details.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • Yes

If yes, please list titles and publications.

My debut picture book BAT COUNT: A CITIZEN SCIENCE STORY, ill. Susan Detwiler (Arbordale) was published in the education market in 2017. BAT COUNT was named a 2018 Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12 by the National Science Teachers Association and the Children's Book Council, was included on the CCBC Choices 2018 list, and received the 2018 Giverny Award and the 2018-19 Keystone to Reading Book Award.

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Someone in my network (word of mouth)

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

Attachments (1)

BUTTON RUN extension questions.docx

As I worked on BUTTON RUN, I kept a list of extension activities and questions that came to mind. A few ideas are attached.

9 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of Joannie Duris
Team

Hi Anna Forrester Wandering through the submissions while we wait for word in the next round, and wanted to let you know I loved the bouncy rhythm and rhyme in your story. It's a fun adventure as they try to retrieve that pesky button. A great read aloud!

View all comments