OpenIDEO is an open innovation platform. Join our global community to solve big challenges for social good. Sign Up / Login or Learn more

Benjamin Franklin Sees The City

The book highlights some of the sites of Philadelphia and lets children know they live in a special place.

Photo of Nina Haines
9 0

Written by

                                

 Benjamin Franklin Sees the City

    By Nina L. Haines


Come along. (children illustrated)

There's a lot to see.

We're off to see the city. ( To the tune of We're Off to See the Wizard from the Wizard of Oz.)

A baseball game on the big field.

Listen to the roar of the crowd.

Clap your hands.

We're off to see the city.

On the river are boats.

Watch people row the boats.

Move your arms as if you are paddling a boat. 

We're off to see the city.

Look at the big bell.

It rang an important message long ago.

Make a sound like a bell. Ring-Ring

We're off to see the city.

See the huge building. 

Books are on its many bookcases.

Keep reading this book.

We're off to see the city.

Lots of animals are in the zoo.

Watch the zebra run.

Run like a zebra.

We're off to see the city.

A huge museum stands on a hilltop.

It’s full of art.

Draw a picture.

We're off to see the city.

There’s a place named after Ben.

That’s because he invented many things.

What would you invent?

We're off to see the city.

Walk through a big market.

Smell the foods from many countries.

Say the food you like best.

The city is a great place to live.


Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

By introducing the sites of the city and accompanying it with illustrations, will encourage caregivers to add details about their experiences at the sites. Each child can imagine themselves traveling along with Ben to see the sites.

Share your suggested book title

Benjamin Franklin Sees The City

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Come along. (children illustrated) There is a lot to see. We're off to see the city. ( To the tune of We're Off to See the Wizard from the Wizard of Oz.) A baseball game on the big field. Listen to the roar of the crowd. Clap your hands. We're off to see the city. On the river are boats. Watch people row the boats. Move your arms as if you're rowing a boat. We're off to see the city. Look at the big bell. It rang an important message long ago. Make a sound like a bell. Ding-dong We're off to see the city. See the great building. Many books are on its shelves. Keep reading this book. We're off to see the city. Lots of animals are in the zoo. Watch the zebra run. Run like a zebra. We're off to see the city. A huge museum stands on a hilltop. It’s full of art. Draw a picture. We're off to see the city. There’s a place named after Ben. That’s because he invented many things. What would you invent? We're off to see the city. Walk through a big market. Smell the foods from many countries. Say your favorite food. The city is a wonderful place to live.

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

Evidence-based information was used from the Cox Campus Read Right From The Start. Looking at pictures interest babies while reading. Talking about the pictures and adding actions with the baby adds interaction and engages the child. Also, rhythm added by singing the same refrain. Then visiting the sites together strengthens the bond of reading by reminding the child about the book they read together.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

The historical sites and CHOP.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

There are numerous sites within the city that are well known by the residents. Because the caregiver will feel comfortable with the content of the reading material; it will spur conversation with the child. This will create curiosity of wanting to visit the sites together.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

Pennsylvania

Location: City

Denver

Tell us more about you / your team

I'm a retired Pediatric Nurse practitioner with three grandchildren that are, six, four and one. Reading is the basis for knowledge and influences everything in life. Children have always been my priority from health to their social well being. I also have multiple sclerosis and know what it means to have your needs met; to be able to function in this complex world.

Provide an example visual identity for a look and feel you might like to achieve. ( (optional question, 3-5 visuals)

Since Benjamin Franklin is not mentioned on the pages; I see Benjamin Franklin being on each page by illustration with children from different cultures. Also along with Benjamin Franklin and children on each page, an illustration of the site that is described with lots of bright colors.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • No

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • Someone in my network (word of mouth)

9 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Spam
Photo of Itika Gupta
Team

Hi Nina Haines   welcome to the Challenge Community once again!
Loved the flow of the manuscript and the unique way of making Benjamin Franklin the protagonist.
To keep the focus of the challenge in place, how might you evolve the story to add nudges for caregivers in the story, that can allow for more interactions on their part that aid in learning development of the child?

Spam
Photo of Nina Haines
Team

Hi,
How do I get a pink outline of a heart?

View all comments