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A Beautiful Day for Words and Play

A fun and engaging story that follows caregiver-baby "conversations" during daily routines and a trip to the Charles L. Durham Library.

Photo of Stephanie Hanson
6 1

Written by

(Each page set will show the caregiver speaking English with a young baby on the left side, and a caregiver speaking Spanish with an older baby or toddler on the right side.  Illustrations for each page set will be similar but differ based on target culture and age.)

Wake up, wake up, it’s a beautiful day!  

“Hi my love!”  “¡Hola mi amor!” 

Babies reach


Kisses, kisses, hugs so sweet! 

“Kisses for my baby!”   “¡Besitos para mi bebé!”

Babies hug 


Stinky, stinky, smelly pants!   

“Wooowee, your diaper stinks!”   “¡Aye, aye, aye, tu pañal huele muy mal!”

Babies laugh


(Illustration on this page set will show the intentional use of "my" and "tu")

Silly, silly face and sound. 

“Pants on my head?”  “¿Pantalones en tu cabeza?”  

Babies grab


Singing, singing breakfast treat!  

“Do you know the muffin man….”  “Arroz con leche. Me quiero casar...”

Babies eat 


Bouncy, bouncy “puh” and “buh.” 

“Diaper, bottle, ball in bag.” “Pañal, biberón, pelota en la bolsa.”

Babies imitate


Tweet, tweet, beep, beep; hear the sounds on the street!  

“Tweet, tweet bird.  Beep, beep bus.” “Pío, pío el pájaro. Bip bip el autobus.”  

Babies find 


Changing, changing red to green.  

“Red means stop and green means go.”  “Rojo significa parar y verde significa ir.”

Babies know


(Double-page spread illustration shows caregivers with babies walking up to the Charles L. Durham Library mural.)

Giants, giants on the wall!

“Wow!  Look at that mural!”  “¡Increíble!  ¡Mira el mural!”

Babies follow


(Double-page spread illustration: close up of mural with the caregiver on one page pointing at Curious George and the caregiver on the other page pointing at The Very Hungry Caterpillar.)

“Look, look, who’s in the book?”  

“Look, a monkey!”  “¡Fijate, una oruga!”

Babies see


Open, open, go inside!

“Welcome to the library!”  “¡Bienvenido a la biblioteca!”

Babies wonder


Reading, reading books are fun!

“Time for storytime.”  “Tiempo para la hora del cuento.”

Babies engage 


Learning, learning every day, through singing, reading, words, and play.

Babies learn,

in one language or two,

and get a great start for ALL that they will do!

Describe the intended vision for your early childhood book manuscript in 1-2 sentences

My book follows two caregivers who engage their babies with words and play during routine activities and a special trip to the Charles L. Durham library. I envision illustrations of one caregiver with a young baby, the other caregiver with an older baby or toddler, and we see them simultaneously in their own environments until they reach the mural at the library.

Share your suggested book title

A Beautiful Day for Words and Play

PLEASE USE THE VERSION OF THIS QUESTION AT THE TOP OF THE SUBMISSION FORM: Share a draft of your manuscript (250 word limit, not including title).

Wake up, wake up, it’s a beautiful day! “Hi my love!” “Hola mi amor!” Babies reach. Kisses, kisses, hugs so sweet! “Kisses for my baby!” “¡Besitos para mi bebé!” Babies hug. Stinky, stinky, smelly pants! “Wooowee, your diaper stinks!” “¡Aye, aye, aye, tu pañal huele muy mal!” Babies laugh. Silly, silly face and sound. “Pants on my head?” “¿Pantalones en tu cabeza?” Babies grab. Singing, singing breakfast treat! “Do you know the muffin man….” “Arroz con leche. Me quiero casar...” Babies eat. Bouncy, bouncy “puh” and “buh.” “Diaper, bottle, ball in bag.” “Pañal, biberón, pelota en la bolsa.” Babies imitate. Tweet, tweet, beep, beep; hear the sounds on the street! “Tweet, tweet bird. Beep, beep bus.” “Pío, pío el pájaro. Bip bip el autobus.” Babies find. Changing, changing red to green! “Red means stop and green means go.” “Rojo significa parar y verde significa ir.” Babies know. Giants, giants on the wall! “Wow! Look at that mural!” “¡Increíble! ¡Mira el mural!” Babies follow. “Look, look, who’s in the book?” “Look, a monkey!” “¡Fijate, una oruga!” Babies see. Open, open, go inside! “Welcome to the library!” “¡Bienvenido a la biblioteca!” Babies wonder. Reading, reading books are fun! “Time for storytime.” “Tiempo para la hora del cuento.” Babies engage. Learning, learning every day, through singing, reading, words, and play. Babies learn, in one language or two, and get a great start for ALL that they will do!

How has this book been informed by early childhood language development research and evidence? (response minimum 250 Characters)

I explored most of the resources provided for the challenge, focusing on presenting Tier 1 vocabulary words in English and Spanish, and providing opportunities to use the READ and PAT strategies suggested by the Rollins Center for Language & Literacy. I incorporated Spanish in the book to demonstrate the importance of caregivers using their home language, as well as to encourage culturally responsive teaching and second language learning, whether readers are Spanish speaking or English speaking. My book centers around daily routines because language is important every day, all day long. Finally, I relied on my knowledge as a Speech-Language Pathologist to create caregiver dialogue that would model caregiver behaviors that support early language development. Modeled behaviors include using nursery rhymes, attention to early developing speech sounds in both languages, auditory bombardment, listening skills, shortened yet adult-like language, joint attention, and exposure to print.

Please describe any familiarity you may have with Philadelphia and its residents? (optional question)

My familiarity with Philadelphia and its residents is limited. I have lived in Colorado my entire life, however, I have family in Pennsylvania and have visited Philadelphia once. I relied on the resources provided for the challenge to discover more about the residents of Philadelphia. I used the internet and Google maps to research the city and discover the Charles L. Durham Library. When I looked up Philadelphia's current demographics, I discovered that Spanish is the second most common language spoken and felt that including Spanish in the story would help connect with a broader audience.

How have you crafted this manuscript to resonate with and/or reflect the experiences of those living in urban contexts? (optional question)

I crafted this manuscript to be flexible for the illustrations, which will provide most of the urban context. I want the illustrations to reflect the challenge personas so that the story resonates with the end reader. The use of English and Spanish also contributes to this connection with the challenge personas. The setting, an urban apartment building within walking distance of the library, and description of the noisy street and the mural on the building also help provide the urban context.

Location: Country

United States

Location: State or Department

CO

Location: City

Cedaredge

Tell us more about you / your team

I am a Speech-Language Pathologist, but am currently working as a high school librarian while I take a temporary career break and pursue my dream of becoming an author. I want to make a positive impact in this world and feel I can do that most effectively through genuine interest in others and kindness towards everyone, regardless of my job title. As a writer, I strive to create fun and engaging stories that I would enjoy reading to my own children or would want to use in speech therapy because of the opportunities they provide to encourage speech or language development. I believe that families are a very important unit in society and that parents play a crucial role as their child's first teacher and role model.

Multiple Choice - Have you been previously published (online, self-published, and print included)?

  • No

Do you have an agent?

  • No

How did you hear about the Challenge? (optional question)

  • SCBWI

What best describes you? (optional question)

  • I am/we are creatives, writers, or artists

6 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Spam
Photo of Dawnnbooks .
Team

Toddlers will learn a second language with such ease that they won't even realise that the story has such a lesson.
Well done.

Spam
Photo of Stephanie Hanson
Team

What an incredible comment, thank you! I hope it can have the same effect on caregivers in learning ways to support early language development with their babies, or even in learning a second language.

Spam
Photo of Dawnnbooks .
Team

You are correct.
In this modern world people with two and more languages are the ones with the edge.
We should I dare say must empower our children.

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