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8 Bit Lifeline

Simple shapes and colors are used to represent a challenging, abstract concept and was designed to be easily recognizable and reproducible.

Photo of Conor Caplice
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Sketch 1 (1,500 characters)

The colors blue and green, colors most commonly associated with all things digital, were used for simple squares to form a line running between two black bars representative of a common cable used for data transmission. The yellow, glowing square at the front is used to indicate the lead of the transmission, help convey a sense of movement, and invoke a callback in the viewer to the common loading or progress bar. The "viruses" are depicted in the same 8-bit squared fashion as the blue and green data being transmitted to depict the similarity between the two. The viruses, however, are colored in shades of red to indicate danger as is the area surrounding the cable and data to denote external threats which are constantly looming. Fading blocks of broken viruses are shown in the bottom left to indicate previously attempted attacks and as a means of depicting how common cyber attacks are. The general idea behind this was to abstract the idea of cybersecurity/hacking into an easily recognizable pattern of colors and shapes in order to quickly and succinctly convey the intended message and, perhaps more importantly, enable a shared means, or language, for communicating the concepts of cybersecurity so websites, blogs, news outlets, etc, do not have to purchase imagery to convey such an important topic or rely upon odd, outdated, or increasingly obscure photographic references.

Sketch 2 (1,500 characters)

The colors blue and green, colors most commonly associated with all things digital, were used for simple squares to form a line running between two black bars representative of a common cable used for data transmission. The yellow, glowing square at the front is used to indicate the lead of the transmission, help convey a sense of movement, and invoke a callback in the viewer to the common loading or progress bar. The "viruses" are depicted in the same 8-bit squared fashion as the blue and green data being transmitted to depict the similarity between the two. The viruses, however, are colored in shades of red to indicate danger as is the area surrounding the cable and data to denote external threats which are constantly looming. Fading blocks of broken viruses are shown in the bottom left to indicate previously attempted attacks and as a means of depicting how common cyber attacks are. The general idea behind this was to abstract the idea of cybersecurity/hacking into an easily recognizable pattern of colors and shapes in order to quickly and succinctly convey the intended message and, perhaps more importantly, enable a shared means, or language, for communicating the concepts of cybersecurity so websites, blogs, news outlets, etc, do not have to purchase imagery to convey such an important topic or rely upon odd, outdated, or increasingly obscure photographic references.

What have you learned through this sketching process? (1,000 characters)

That creating a depiction of cybersecurity that doesn't fall back on old, tired tropes is almost as difficult as implementing actual cybersecurity. I honestly do not expect to win this competition as all my graphic art skills are self-taught, but I really did enjoy the challenge of thinking about it.

Tell us more about you. (1,000 characters)

I'm a 32 year-old Chicago native. I hold a Master's in English and am employed as a content manager at a Growth Consultancy in the western Chicago suburbs. I started teaching myself how to code in middle school and have always loved learning about new technology and revel in taking old pieces of tech apart to see how they work and how I can push the limits of what they were designed to originally do.

Why are you participating in this Challenge? (750 characters)

I liked the challenge. Most current cybersecurity visuals are the same terrible depiction of a guy in a hoodie with binary code streaming down around him and I was drawn in by the idea of trying to create something new.

Website(s)

www.ConorCaplice.com

What is your experience with the field of cybersecurity?

  • I have minimal experience and/or knowledge in the cybersecurity field.

What best describes you?

  • I’m a visual creator by hobby.

How did you hear about this OpenIDEO Challenge?

  • In the news

Location: City

Downers Grove

Location: State / District

Illinois

Location: Country

  • United States of America

4 comments

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Photo of debadatta hembram

Conor Caplice I think this can made better if you also include the source and destination of these bits as well. While the illustration may work when accompanied with proper explanation, on it own it loses proper context and can be hard to understand.

Photo of Conor Caplice

Great idea, thanks! I'll try and figure out the best way to improve upon the original concept while still maintaining the inherent simplicity. :)

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