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"How to be an explorer of the world" - Keri Smith

Keri Smith has published a number of books encouraging people to observe, explore, discover, and document the world around them and be creative. Might this type of "mission" approach be used to cultivate creative confidence?

Photo of Saskia Baard
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This book takes a 'mission' approach - there are 59 missions in the book, each encouraging explorations of your surroundings, and documenting them as well. 

There is no right or wrong, this is how you see the world. It is open ended, yet structured, creating limitations within which to work, making it a safer space for someone who might not be that confident yet. 

Might books and approaches like these be used to make young people more aware of their environment, and more confident in how they interact with it, leading to greater creative confidence? 

More: 
Keri Smith website:  http://www.kerismith.com/

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Photo of Hal DuBois

A great deal to build on here, Saskia. The list of approaches to exploration at the top of the brainpickings link was especially inspiring.

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Photo of Saskia Baard

Hey Harold, if you're interested, have a look at this idea which is related to this inspiration: http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/ideas/create-your-journal/

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Photo of Hal DuBois

Love the stain collection page! The idea that's sprouting from my newbie perspective started with the "creative space" "first steps" "failure/rejection" and "active collaboration" elements. Basically, the thought is to break scale and environment, make the space explored totally unfamiliar and other worldly. (Thus creating a space where nothing can be viewed as the "right answer.") A virtual world would be ideal. But it could be as simple as have a photo of some ultramicroscopic thing, giving a kid a straw, and asking them to report what it tastes like. I just think the first think to combat here is the "that's important" "that's not important" learning we all undergo in our formative years. Essentially, this space is devoid of potential many preconceptions and prior learning. (The short and long duration observations in the initial post also seems particularly valuable, as would doing some observations alone, some in pairs and some in teams.)

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Photo of Saskia Baard

Harold, interesting ideas! I especially like what you say about unlearning the labeling of important and unimportant things while we learn.
Maybe you can post the comment on the Create your Journal idea as well, or create a new idea that builds on that one? A lot of people have moved on from the inspiration phase and are now mostly active in the Ideas phase - I would recommend to participate there- there's lots of ideas that would benefit from your insights!

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Photo of Hal DuBois

Thanks for the response and the guiding hand, Saskia!

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