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Smart labels for small plastic pacakging

Smart magnetic visual labels which complement brand designs, consumer psychology and importantly recycle infrastructure

Photo of Ravish Majithia
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INTRODUCTION

Small-format plastic packaging faces an environmental double-whammy. Such items are cheap to manufacture but hard to recycle precisely because they are small in form factor. We at Magnomer have redesigned small plastic packaging by adding smart functional labels to make them recycle-friendly. Such visual functional labels complement brand designs, consumer psychology and most importantly recycle infrastructure.

OUR SOLUTION

In a cradle-to-cradle type approach we focus modifying current small-format plastic packaging so as to complement current widely prevalent curbside recycle infrastructure. We do so by adding functionality using visual magnetizable labels. Such labels help brands visually showcase their sustainability mission right on the product. Consumers do nothing except discard packaging in recycle bins as usual. Once in recycle processing facilities (MRFs), Magnomer labels show off their functional properties. These labels render plastic objects completely magnetizable and enable automated separation by industrial magnetic separators. 

IMPORTANT FEATURES

Recycle-related

  1. Our patent pending labels are designed with APR (Association of Plastic Recyclers) guidelines in mind. This means that there are no detrimental impact to recycling post segregation at Material Recovery Facilities (MRFs)
  2. The end product (eg: a Magnomer designed spoon or bottle cap) is intended to be discarded curbside single or dual stream collection programs. MRFs will be able to recover Magnomer-designed packaging by use of commercial magnetic separators. 


Manufacture-related

  1. The labels are made with food-safe materials and can be safely used with food-service packaging. 
  2. Labels can be made in a variety of colors
  3. Labels can be easily integrated in manufacturing processes of plastic packaging.


TECHNICAL VIABILITY

At Magnomer, we have undergone extensive prototyping and pilot tests to prove technical viability. As seen in our preliminary video below – our labels can be applied to various types of packaging.

We have also done pilot runs on commercial benchtop-scale magnetic separators. In a sample test shown below, we successfully recover 28 mm plastic bottle caps. In this test, we have a mixture of standard 28 mm (blue) bottle caps which have not been modified (i.e: the non-magnetic fraction) and 28 mm white caps which have a single Magnomer smart label (red) around their circumference. The test shows separation between them.

(Video Runs 26 seconds)

In our tests, we carefully stimulated real-life complications of:

  • Burden depth (the amount of material on a conveyer belt at any given time) and
  •  Conveyor belt speeds


Our current tests with a benchtop-size commercial magnetic separator shows an average of 89% recovery for 25-28 mm bottle caps. While there is still room for improvement with larger MRF-scale magnets, which we will confirm in our commercial MRF pilots, our in-house pilot tests clearly prove commercial-scale viability

MRF Pilot (planned)


Magnomer, LLC currently has plans in place to pilot and test modified caps and cutlery in a MRF owned by Casella Waste Systems, Inc (Nasdaq: CWST). In this pilot, Magnomer will seed labelled cutlery (manufactured by Recycline, LLC – www.preserveprodcuts.com) and labelled 28 mm bottle caps in Casella’s MRF facilities located in Auburn, MA. Magnomer-modified plastic ware will be recovered by the use of a drum-type magnetic separator installed at end-of-line for glass cullet. Our goal is 90% or greater recovery of targeted materials in the test

What's our MVP?

While our technology can be applied to various packaging items, we chose to focus on Type 5 (polypropylene) bottle caps and cutlery as our minimum viable product. This choice has been made after extensive concept validation with recyclers (MRFs) and manufacturers. Key reasons outlines below:



  1. Bottle caps and plastic cutlery are emblematic of the problem with small packaging. Recycling rates for plastic cutlery is negligent even in countries with the most advanced collection and sortation systems. The primary reason for this is lack of recoverability at MRFs for said items. These items behave like small glass shards in a single or dual stream MRFs and end up contaminating the glass fraction. Magnomer discovered that glass fractions at an average MRF in the US can contain anywhere between 10-20% plastic. Most of this plastic is bottle caps or cutlery.
  2. Most bottle caps and over 60% of cutlery in the US is made from Type 5 plastic. Strong market demand for recycled Type 5 plastic currently exists and is slated to grow in the coming years.
  3. Addition of Magnomer's labels can be done cost-effectively on bottle caps and cutlery from a manufacturing standpoint. 


A change in design of standard plastic cutlery and bottle caps to Magnomer's magnetizable design would enable 

  1. Greater recoverability and therefore recycling of said packaging and
  2. Lower contamination and increased recycling viability of glass.


Detailed Pitch Deck

Idea Title

Attractive Recycling

Company / Organization Name

Magnomer, LLC

Website

www.magnomer.com

Where are you / your team located?

Boston, MA, USA

How does this Idea redesign unrecyclable small format plastic items that often end up as waste?

CPG brands and packagers apply Magnomer labels on small-format packaging. Consumers discard Magnomer labelled packaging in recycling and are not required to change behavior. MRFs retrieve packaging from single-stream using magnetic separators. Packaging gets processed by re-claimers and recycled back into new products. The proposed redesign automates sorting of light-weight small format packaging thereby making recycling of said object both technologically and financially viable.

Which use cases does your Idea apply to?

While described approach applies to all use cases under consideration, largest applicability is for case 2 (bottle caps). Bottle caps behave as glass shards during sortation of recyclables. Application of smart magnetizable labels will allow retrieval of bottle caps from the glass stream directly with little cost to processors. A change in product design consequently directly co-relates to higher recycling in this case.

In what geographical context or area does your Idea plan to operate / solve?

Countries with single or dual stream collection and existing Material Recovery facilities (MRFs). Currently testing in Boston, MA

How do you envision scaling up your Idea?

Controlled introduction of plastic cutlery and caps in the marketplace will be needed to test recovery rates. Tests in small geographies are currently planned. Wide-scale introduction to occur in step stages. Wide-scale introduction hinges on two key factors: 1) Commitment from large scale consumers and manufacturers of packaging (CPGs, QSRs and big-box retailers) to use described invention 2) Commitment from MRFs (waste management companies) to process magnetizable plastic packaging

At what stage of development is your Idea?

  • Prototyping: You have conducted some small tests or experiments with prospective users and will continue developing idea through these tests.
  • Piloting: You have started to implement your solution as a whole with a first set of real users. You may have started to develop a business model for your idea, including identifying key customer segments, relevant partnerships, go-to-market strategy, and draft financials.

Please describe how becoming a Top Idea and working with the Think Beyond Plastics Accelerator Program will help to accelerate your solution.

The NPE accelerator and its team of industry advisors can help us build strong relationships with our customers (packaging manufacturers). We would define success by collaborating with our first customer in launching a Magnomer-designed cutlery (or bottle cap). We also need seed funding to pilot our solution with a potential customer. NPE's seed money will help enable this in the short-term

Please describe from where your Idea emerged

The concept was born out of an idea of using magnetics to address the ever-growing problem of plastics waste. The idea came about to the founder of Magnomer (Ravish) during a serendipitous interaction while segregating waste for recycling during his PhD years. Research into the waste management chain led to multiple iterations of the concept leading up to its current form - a magnetizable label. Magnomer co-founder Vishal was a key participant in brainstorming.

Tell us about your work experience

Ravish Majithia - Magnomer founder - PhD (Materials Science, Texas A&M University), MBA (Babson College) Vishal Salian - Magnomer co-founder - PhD (Chemical Eng., Auburn University)

Please describe your legal and organizational structure

Magnomer is an LLC based in MA, USA. Ravish Majithia and Vishal Salian both serve on the Board of Directors for Magnomer.

Please describe, in detail, your business model and how you intend to test and iterate this model.

Magnomer designs magnetizable packaging and manufactures materials related to implementation of its designs in two specific verticals. a) Plastic cutlery & b) Bottle caps We modify current product designs for manufacturers and brands to enable effective placement of Magnomer labels. Subsequently, we test recoverability in MRFs (if needed). For sustainable source of revenue, Magnomer will manufacture and supply materials related to implementation of its designs.

Please explain how your innovation will work within, potentially improve, and provide benefit to the plastics system.

Over 95% of people in the US have access to curbside recycling. Magnetizable functionality – added by means of Magnomer labels – serves to complement curbside recycling. The visual nature of Magnomer labels will reinforce discarding in recycle bins by average consumers. The magnetisable functionality of our design allows increased sortation of plastics by MRFs using industry standard magnetic separators and thereby serves to increase recycling of plastics and improve purity of glass cullets.

Please describe, in depth, how your solution will reduce the overall environmental footprint of packaging.

Currently, there is practically no recycling of small plastic items like bottle caps and cutlery. Magnomer labels will improve their recycle rates significantly (90% recovery observed in our in-house pilot testing). The labels themselves are made using completely recyclable materials (additional label weight ~1%) that are recoverable in the existing plastic recycling process with minor modifications. Non-toxic raw materials used so no environmental damage due to leakage/leaching is anticipated.

Please outline how your design, material, and delivery choices will influence price, and how you intend to address the price increase that may result from this solution.

Magnomer designs consists of labels which would add anywhere between 5-25% additional manufacturing cost for packaging. The additional cost gives brands immediate ROI in terms of a marketing benefit. The enhanced product design also allows brands to introduce a more recyclable, ecofriendly variant in their existing packaging options with a premium passed over to consumers. For MRFs on the downstream end, additional revenue will be generated due to better sorting of plastics from glass cullets.

Please explain how your solution will impact user behavior, and what design considerations you've included to ensure easy and intuitive interactions with your Idea. 

Over 95% of people in the US have access to curbside recycling. The key to our idea is that Magnomer labels – serve to complement curbside recycling by working with existing recycling infrastructure without requiring a change in consumer behaviour. The visual nature of Magnomer labels will reinforce discarding in recycle bins by average consumers. Lastly, our design enables increased sortation by MRFs and thereby serves to increase recycling rates using industry standard magnetic separators.

Please describe how you intend to use the prize funding, if selected as a Top Idea. Be specific.

a. Pilot test: Testing magnomer labelled caps and cutlery in a MRF owned by Casella Waste Systems, Inc. b. Technical Refinement: Modification of labels to improve scalability and reduce costs during large scale manufacturing c. Manufacturing setup

44 comments

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Photo of Paula Baldó de Andrés
Team

It's a great idea!
I've seen magnets used in recycling facilities to select cans and other metal objects from the rest of the garbage, so I think this could be easy to implement.
The part that i find more difficult is finding a recyclable material that does not affect the process of recycling plastics. Tell us wich one will work when you find it!
Good luck!

Photo of Lauren Ito
Team

Hi Ravish Majithia 

A friendly reminder that the final deadline for all materials is 8 hours away, August 31st at 11:30 p.m. Pacific Time. Please be sure all final updates to your post are completed by this time!

We have received your Refinement Questions Submission Form.

Thanks for being such an incredible member of the OpenIDEO Community!

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Ravish!

There are 7 days left in the refinement phase.

If there is key information in the comments on your idea submission, I recommend that you move them to the main body of your idea submission before the cut-off time.

I just want to remind you that the deadline to complete the Refinement Questions via the online submission form is August 31 at 11:30 p.m. Pacific Time.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Ravish and team!

Welcome to refinement!

What is the impact of adding this strip on (1) the cost of the item and (2) the recyclability of the item?

What collection and sorting systems are suitable for this solution and how common are they? Which are not i.e. regions where metals and plastics are collected together and magnets are used to separate plastics from metals?

What is the MVP?

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me by tagging me here (@ followed by my name) or send me an email - krushton@ideo.com

I just want to remind you that the deadline to complete the Refinement Questions via the online submission form is August 31 at 11:30 p.m. Pacific Time.

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

@Kate Rushton We plan to address most questions during our submission and update our public submission here shortly. Please find below answers to your questions.

1) Cost: labels would add anywhere between 5-25% additional cost of manufacturing depending on the product characteristics. The additional cost gives companies an immediate ROI in terms of a marketing benefit. Brands would be able to claim that they are curbside-recyclable. The enhanced product design also allows brands to introduce a variant in their existing packaging options with a premium passed over to consumers.

2) There is no impact on recyclability of the item. The labels are completely recyclable. We are taking effort to use materials which comply with APR (Association of Plastic Recyclers) guidelines. APR puts out public information about what types of labels should be used. Ours will comply with the said.

3) The design is done with an effort to make packaging curbside-recyclable. In the US over 95% of the people have access to curbside recycling. ( See page 6 in this report: https://plastics.americanchemistry.com/Education-Resources/Publications/Plastic-Recycling-Collection-National-Reach-Study-2012-Update.pdf).

4) Both single-stream and dual - stream is workable for sorting the said magnetizable packaging. MRFs would need to add a magnetic separator and end-of-line to sort Magnomer packaging. Such a separator typically costs between $10,000 - $20,000 and a standard MRF would break even on such investment between 3-6 months based on our calculations.

5) Type 5 Plastic cutlery (first) and Type 5 bottle caps (second) are our MVP's. We will have details in our refinement submission.

Photo of Bruno dos Santos Pierosan
Team

Hi there Ravish Majithia ! I think you have a really big potential with your idea. However, I would like to ask a few questions, to see if there is anything I can suggest to contribute.

- Regarding the compatibility between recyclable items, would the labels always be applied to only one type of plastic?
- Could the labels be recyclable? Has the impact caused by its manufacture, application, disposal and recycling (if any) been measured?
- If they are not recyclable, what would be the impact of their disposal?
- Is it necessary to use composites or other difficult-to-recycle materials once they are produced?
- Have you ever thought about the idea of enhancing this proposal by doing cultural actions to try to reduce the amount of the disposal of this kind of package?

I liked your idea! Good luck!!

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Bruno dos Santos Pierosan 

Please find answers below.
1) We intend to apply the solution only to Type 5 plastic initially.
2) The labels are recyclable. We are taking effort to use materials which comply with APR (Association of Plastic Recyclers) guidelines. APR puts out public information about what types of labels should be used. Ours will comply with the said.
3) See answer above. No detrimental impact of label disposal - recycled similar to other labels.
4) No. We are not using any composite materials for our labels.
5) The labels - being visual in nature - will remind customers to discard correctly. No current plans to implement a mass media communications strategy. Could be worth considering in future.

Photo of Jess Mak
Team

Hi Ravish,

You say that your invention would require a whole-hearted buy in from MRFs and packaging companies. Would there be a considerable additional cost for such companies to adopt your solution, and if so, how do you intend to get and keep them onboard?

I think that your idea is clever and simple. Best of luck!

Jess

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Jess,

Our labels and the labels would add anywhere between 5-25% additional cost of manufacturing depending on the product characteristics. The additional cost gives companies an immediate ROI in terms of a marketing benefit. Brands would be able to claim that they are curbside-recyclable. The enhanced product design also allows brands to introduce a variant in their existing packaging options with a premium passed over to consumers.

Photo of Joanna Malaczynski
Team

Hi Ravish Majithia , thank you for writing me on my design idea page, Feeding Sustainable Local Designs into Global Distribution Chains . Your idea seems quite promising. I don't have a full understanding of the sorting issues related to recycling, and present some questions you might want to answer on your page for those of us who would like to learn more:
1) Would a magnet approach get in the way of sorting / separating certain metals?
2) How do you account for the need to separate different types of plastics? I believe in the US, different types of plastics are coded with a recycling number, so that they can be sorted separately.
3) How about using a small chip and scanner rather than a magnet? I have heard that clothing companies are putting such small chips in clothing items to track them. If the chip technology is already scaled to apparel, could it be scaled to plastic recycling?
4) What technology do you need to separate the marker (metal, chip, etc) from the plastic before it is recycled?
5) Can you place the market (metal, chip, etc) on the inside or make it less visually dominant? Companies with brand names generally don't like competing brand info on their products.

Best wishes,
Joanna

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Joanna Malaczynski Please find answers below

1) Would a magnet approach get in the way of sorting / separating certain metals?
We can go into technical details -but the short answer is No. MRFs are capable of handling our packaging and sorting currently.
2) How do you account for the need to separate different types of plastics? I believe in the US, different types of plastics are coded with a recycling number, so that they can be sorted separately.
Plastic sortation for diffrent types is done by optical sorting. Our labels don't hinder but complement optical sortation (which is currently not capable for small package sorting - although there are recent studies available which show feasibility). Our lables serve as means to retrive small-format packaging so as to get to a crticial mass which can then support sub-sorting by optical means.

3) How about using a small chip and scanner rather than a magnet? I have heard that clothing companies are putting such small chips in clothing items to track them. If the chip technology is already scaled to apparel, could it be scaled to plastic recycling?
We forsee cost and supply-chain integration issues. Apparel are durable goods - which means that per unit cost of such chips would be higher than the entire cost of a coffee cup or a sandwich bag. Our solution takes such cost and the supply-chain of packaging into account
4) What technology do you need to separate the marker (metal, chip, etc) from the plastic before it is recycled?
The tech would be no different than the ones currently used to separate existing labels
5) Can you place the market (metal, chip, etc) on the inside or make it less visually dominant? Companies with brand names generally don't like competing brand info on their products.
We are aware of brand design concerns. This can be addressed on a case-by-case basis.

Photo of Ion Muraru
Team

questions 4 and 5 are the most important: is true, actually mix two different materials ( plastic and magnet) means will be more work to separate them , then why a plastic company will do this? The sleeves on the coffee cups is a good idea, is easy separable, the coffee shop can order their own name, cheap ( just a printed paper...).
Joanna, very good point!

Photo of Sharvil Desai
Team

Loved the idea! Goodluck!

Photo of Andrew
Team

Am I correct in assuming that it just sorts plastic items out from general waste, but does not sort them into their respective polymers - HDPE, PP etc? Some form of post processing is required for that.....

Photo of Vishakha Koli Lakhani
Team

Goodluck

Photo of Saachi Singh
Team

This is amazing! Can't wait to see it implemented.

Photo of Andrew
Team

An excellent suggestion.

Photo of Siobhan Bailey
Team

I really enjoy the visual identification to consumers. The current recycling symbol on plastic items is often highly inconspicuous, which negates its main purpose. A red strip right in line with where the consumer directly interacts with a product is much more effective at signaling that an item is recyclable. Ravish Majithia I was wondering what material you are putting into the seal to make it magnetic, and its cradle to grave impact on the Earth. Since the essence of this challenge isn't just better recycling but better sustainability overall, is that taken into account in the chosen magnetic material, how it is sourced, how it will effect the recyclability of a product, etc.?

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Siobhan Bailey Thanks for your comments.

As to your question about recyclability of the the label itself and it's constituents - we have taken in account two factors:
1) The packaging and label gets collected by waste collection systems as intended. In this case - our labels would enable chemical and mechanical processes which help recycling. Magnetic separation is used beyond materials recovery facilities. It is widely used in the actual recycling processes.
2) In the second case, packaging does leak into the environment. In this case the constituents, which are non-toxic and are have required regulatory approvals, would have no additional adverse impact on the environment.

You also bring up good points about sustainable sourcing. While we are not that far along but we are working with vendors which can comply with cradle-to-cradle principles. In fact we are working with Preserve (based in Waltham, MA) who uses only recycled plastic for its products. I encourage you to look them up www.preserveproducts.com - if you would like more information.

Photo of alpha bootes
Team

Easier to recover, recycle and reuse.
Excellent Idea!!!

Photo of Shilpa Thakkar-Badiani
Team

It's really innovative idea... keep it up....

Photo of Dhara Shah
Team

Good job!

Photo of Akshat Thakkar
Team

Great stuff!

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Thank you!

Photo of Parth Thakkar
Team

Awesome idea

Photo of Charmy Nandani
Team

Brilliant Idea

Photo of Shrey Lakhani
Team

Really nice Idea

Photo of Sanket Dixit
Team

Nice idea ��������

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

New video and updated submission. Thanks to everyone who has supported us so far.

Photo of Emma Chow
Team

Quite an interesting idea with lots of potential. Key questions that come to mind right away include:
- How quickly can this solution be implemented?
- What % of recycling processors in Boston area, Massachusetts, the US, and then internationally use magnetic sorting systems? How much do they cost? How long does it take to install them?
- What is the solution for recycling processors who receive "single-stream" waste (e.g. the magnet would pick up metal items along with the paper items with magnetic bands)?
- What is the consequence for manufacturers that do not include the metal band or are hesitant to adopt?
- Are manufacturers incentivized at all to change the way they actually produce packaging to be less resource intensive?

Let me know if you have questions or if you'd like me to elaborate further.
I'm also new to the Boston Chapter and happy to talk through your idea more.

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Emma - See answers below

- How quickly can this solution be implemented?
Our solution is designed to be scalable. We are working with MRFs to determine accurate timeline of conversion but the answers is in months.

- What % of recycling processors in Boston area, Massachusetts, the US, and then internationally use magnetic sorting systems? How much do they cost? How long does it take to install them?
100% Magnetic sorting is the most common tech. used worldwide. Magnetic separators are also one of the most least expensive (in cost and install time) capital equipment a MRF (recycling processor) can buy.

- What is the solution for recycling processors who receive "single-stream" waste (e.g. the magnet would pick up metal items along with the paper items with magnetic bands)?
Our solution is designed keeping in mind single-stream MRFs (processors). Metals are typically not an issue for films and lightweight plastics since they flow differently in a single-stream operation. Magnetic separation between metals and our packaging would be done based on differences in form-factor and density. I'd be happy to share more information on this if needed.

- What is the consequence for manufacturers that do not include the metal band or are hesitant to adopt?
Functional design (as we propose) is a market differentitor for brands that see sustainability as their mission. One would hope that given clear market incentives we would move to a sustainable packaging design. (This answer is true irrespective or our solution)

- Are manufacturers incentivized at all to change the way they actually produce packaging to be less resource intensive?
I'm not sure i understand this one. But, Yes. Too often it is said that cost is the only determinant for change in packaging. While this is not unture, it is not the only factor. If product design can affect reduction in waste - packagers see incentives.

Let me know if you have questions or if you'd like me to elaborate further.
I'm also new to the Boston Chapter and happy to talk through your idea more.
--- Sure, I see that you have some experience in C2C Product certifications. Would be interested in understanding the process from you. We are looking in that direction.

Photo of Emma Chow
Team

Hi Ravish - thanks for the responses. To clarify my last question, I think the government would need to implement policies that require the packaging changes that your solution would entail. Such policies include could come in the form of Extended Producer Responsibility regulations. From my research on EPR in Sweden, producers innovate and implement sustainable production practices (e.g. finding new ways to produce packaging with fewer resources) when they will otherwise incur higher costs if they proceed with business as usual. I'm happy to have a more in-depth conversation on EPR and how costs are carried to producers. Potential costs tend to lead to positive change more than potential payments (e.g. my costs will increase $50 per 1000 units vs. I will receive a tax break of $50 per 1000 units if I do X, Y, Z). I think your idea could be a great solution to offer to producers as a means for responding to EPR. If they adopt this updated packaging and recyclers have magnetic infrastructure, then more of the producers' products will be properly recycled at their end of use life.

I am C2C Institute certified and am happy to share more information about the certification and C2C frameworks. Feel free to email me directly - emmacchow@gmail.com. I will be in Boston this weekend and then traveling internationally for three weeks.

Photo of Juan Giraldo
Team

Great Project that could actually help to solve a massive problem. In addition the team has the skills needed to actually make it happen.
Keep up the work Magnomer!

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Thanks for the kind comments!

Photo of Gretchen Gary
Team

Very interesting idea. I like the approach in letting the plastic sort itself. However it also implies that people put the trash in the recycle bin rather than the waste bin. When I did some research for this project in San Diego, I heard that no small-form plastics are removed from the waste stream if it is not collected as recyclable material. I also heard in speaking with a colleague who works on recycling programs nationwide that recycling infrastructure in rural USA is insufficient at best. One San Diego waste management service I interviewed did say they are working on technology to help sort the waste stream ... maybe this is the kind of solution they would consider if manufacturers were open to adopt into their processes. It would take a fair amount of time however for product and process to catch on.

How does this solve for the personas featured in this challenge? What's the incentive for the consumer to change behavior and properly dispose of small-form plastic packaging rather than tossing it on the side of the road or putting it in the waste bin rather than the recycle bin?

Overall I like the direction of this concept. Very innovative.

Photo of Ravish Majithia
Team

Thanks for the comments Gretchen.

As you correctly point out, curbside recycling is not ubiquitous but is the most widespread both in the US and globally. Here is a recent report by Moore which shows the reach of curbside programs in the US. Please do refer to page 6 in the report if you are hurried for time.
https://plastics.americanchemistry.com/Education-Resources/Publications/Plastic-Recycling-Collection-National-Reach-Study-2012-Update.pdf

The solution is proposed keeping in mind the need for use of small-format packaging such as ziploc bags, scahets or bottle caps by consumers and yet be recyclable by curbside recycling programs. As mentioned in the use personas - consumers like the convenience of use but would like a conduit to discard correctly so as to alleviate environmental impact. We believe our product design achieves this goal.

The above is also the incentive to discard correctly. A visual label will help serve as a reminder to consumers. In this case, product design helps nudge consumers towards higher compliance.

Photo of Bhavik Nathwani
Team

Elegant solution for a long-standing unmet need! The product's likely to have an excellent future. Good luck!

Photo of John Whelan
Team

Very, very clever solution to a massive problem! Love the technical feasibility, and also that it doesn't require behavioral change from consumers.

Photo of Eagle Wu
Team

10/10 would recommend

Photo of Akshi Thakkar
Team

Very innovative idea and a great concept! Good luck!

Photo of Derek Tu
Team

Totally would add this to our packaging!

Photo of April Chen
Team

A great solution to a pressing problem.

Photo of Yulkendy Valdez
Team

Very innovative way to approach this very urgent need!

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Ravish,

Excited to see you joining this challenge. We noticed your post is currently unpublished. Was this your intention? We'd love to have it be included in the challenge. You can publish it by hitting the "Publish" button at the top of your post. You can also update your post by clicking on the "Edit Contribution" on top.

We're looking forward to seeing your contribution in this challenge.