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MWB: The master degree of world benefit

If you want to change the world, you might want to start with the next generation of leaders. And as OpenIDEO is popular in several schools, maybe there's one that can start the Masters of World Benefit program.

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22 15

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Imagine this: the young leaders of tomorrow no longer have the three letters 'MBA' printed on their business cards, but in stead have MWB. They have gone through an extensive Master-level course, teaching them not only how to run a profitable business, but to make that also profitable and beneficial to societies and our environment.

Update
As Timo pointed out in the comments, the job of CCO (Chief Caring Officer) as proposed by Avi, is of course held by people with an MWB.

Also, as Kirk suggested, it should be good to capitalize on the relationships between educational institutions and companies to further develop and spread this new degree.

This is a short concept, open for discussion and builds. It's inspired by a comment of James on my TEE concept.

Get the title into circulation
As I understood from the comment from Beau, the Weatherhead School of Management is already integrating design and sustainability into its curriculum. I think this is an important start: getting the thinking around shared value into the minds of future (business) leaders. To start with, it would be nice if graduates of MBA programs would also get the MWB title. Maybe not officially recognised yet, but with some out there, there could be a case made to get the title an official standing.

Next thing is to have some partner companies (maybe IDEO.org in the search for fellow), add this title to job descriptions as a 'nice-to-have' requirement. Even though this may not be suitable yet, as there are no MWB title-holders, it gives a signal to the market that this is something to take seriously. It will add to the aspirational value of the title.

Building a curriculum
As for the curriculum, design thinking should be part of it. And sustainability. I really like the thinking of Umair Haque and the late Ray Anderson, so I think it's good to integrate that into the course, maybe through a guest lecture.
As suggested by several in the comments, there are some great disruptive institutions out there. Kaos Pilots were mentioned, and also Knowmads. It would be great to integrate some of their content into the course. What makes these change makers successful, would be the leading question for that. 
Another educational disruptor mentioned is the Khan Academy. Maybe there could be a series of courses, with tests etcetera, delivered through Coursera for example, that would give students credits with which they can finalise the MWB/MBA program in a shorter time. Say 50 - 75% of total credits?
For those not familiar with Coursera, it delivers free university level courses online.

Photo courtesy of Thirty30 Photography on Flickr

How does your concept celebrate, identify or inspire for-profit businesses that act as agents of world benefit?

Case studies should be used during the cause, making tomorrow's leaders familiar with the great companies that innovate for world benefit, and learn from it. Also, promoting the MWB title, and making it as attractive for students and employers as possible, will help.

How will your concept help us create or leverage stories of world benefit that are sticky and shareable?

Not sure, but having many young students aim for a certain degree could help. Other than that, this concept is open to suggestions and builds.

What will it take to scale your concept so that its reach is global and widespread?

Commitment from a few leading business schools to start this program.

Evaluation results

9 evaluations so far

1. How well could this concept surface or identify examples of businesses that currently innovate for world benefit?

Really well: this concept clearly outlines the steps to identify great examples - 22.2%

Pretty well: this concept talks about identifying great examples but it's not clear exactly how - 33.3%

Not so well: this concept doesn't focus on identifying great examples - 44.4%

2. How well could this concept create or celebrate stories of world benefit that are memorable and shareable?

Really well: this concept is clearly focused on creating or celebrating stories of world benefit - 11.1%

Pretty well: this concept talks about creating or celebrating stories of world benefit but it's not clear exactly how - 44.4%

Not so well: this concept does not focus on creating or celebrating stories of world benefit - 44.4%

3. How well could this concept inspire or enable other for-profit businesses who want to innovate for world benefit?

Really well: this concept is clearly focused on inspiring or enabling others who want to innovate for world benefit - 37.5%

Pretty well: this concept talks about inspiring or enabling others who want to innovate for world benefit but it's not clear exactly how - 50%

Not very well: this concept does not focus on inspiring or enabling others who want to innovate for world benefit - 12.5%

4. Does this concept have the potential to scale globally and reach diverse audiences?

Yes: this concept absolutely has the potential to scale globally and reach diverse audiences - 33.3%

Maybe: this concept may have the potential to scale globally and reach diverse audiences but it's not clear exactly how - 55.6%

No: this concept does not have the potential to scale globally and reach diverse audiences - 11.1%

5. Overall, how do you feel about this concept?

It rocked my world - 33.3%

I liked it but preferred others - 33.3%

It didn't get me overly excited - 33.3%

22 comments

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Photo of An Old Friend
Team

Just a random thought in terms of program design. To use an example, Stanford's d.school is basically a hub that draws from every program at a university (see "Radical Collaboration" @ http://dschool.stanford.edu/our-point-of-view/ ). So, someone pursuing any degree (engineering, design, social sciences, education, business, etc.) can study this topic, and apply it to their careers; this flexibility may maximize the program's reach.

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Team

DeletedUser

Yes, and instead of this being a "hub" like the d.school, maybe it's a combo of sorts. My university had LAMP, Liberal Arts and Management Program, and I'm sure it's not the only university with such a thing. So maybe the MWB requires a certain amount of business acumen regardless of which discipline the student comes from. Playing off the value of a certification from Cesar's comment above, that business aspect combined with the other discipline may make for an impressive MWB. It would help especially during early adoption: businesses hire these people with management and [other] background solely for the value of such multi-disciplinary hires, and then to later realize, "Wow, these MWBs are something special. Maybe we should hire more of them."

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