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PIC - Photos in Immunization Clinic

PIC is a service that tackles the problems of poor vaccine record keeping, vaccine disinformation, and low motivation to visit hospitals.

Photo of Youngbae Chee
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Describe what you intend to do and how you'll do it in one sentence (required 250 Characters)

By incorporating a photo booth inside a health clinic and village health workers to hand out photo albums with immunization information, PIC aims to incentivize caregivers to immunize their children.

Explain the idea (less than 2,000 characters)

PIC aims to make immunization a memorable experience. Through our interviews with experts and Kenyan mothers, we identified that the side-effects associated with immunization mars the immunization process. Currently, a mother who returns from the health clinic only recalls the crying baby, rude hospital workers, and long lines. PIC addresses these concerns by providing a service within the clinic and incorporating trusted village health workers. The village health workers will hand out photo albums to caregivers and explain the immunization process with the visual information provided in the album. Within the clinic, there will be a photo booth where the caregivers can take photos with their children. We want to make the experience of visiting a health clinic to be a positive memory. After the photograph is taken, then the caregiver and child will proceed with the doctor for vaccinations. Then, the caregiver and the child will receive the photo, and the photo will have the current date and the next date for the vaccination on the back. The photograph can be kept safely in the photo album. We chose the photo album because of the emotional appeal it has with families and the low risk of misplacing it. The images above showcase Anne-Laure Fayard's work in slums of Kathmandu. She discovered that mothers were extremely happy to have photos taken with their children. While we often take this experience for granted, many mothers in Kathmandu never had even a single photograph of their children. We think that the PIC photographs will be items that many families will cherish, as well as encourage them to return to clinics for immunization. We also aim to rope in a celebrity figure to do a massive radio campaign to dispel myths associated with vaccination.

Which part(s) of the world does this idea target?

  • Eastern Africa

Geographic Focus (less than 250 Characters)

We are focusing on the Eastern Africa region.

Who are your end users and how well do you know them? (750 characters)

Our primary end users are caregivers (particularly mothers) in the most at-risk areas of the region. Village health workers and the immunization clinics can be considered secondary users, however, since they will also be involved in the service. We think that uniting all of these users with PIC will lead to stronger relationships and better experiences between parties, which will ultimately result in increased immunization. We have spoken with multiple people on the ground in Uganda who work tirelessly in promoting immunization, one of which who has become our teammate (Ochola Amosiah). Interviews and feedback from such sources have both supported and shaped our idea.

How is the idea unique? (750 Characters)

Our research has identified numerous obstacles to immunization including 1) misinformation, 2) a low incentive for caregivers to visit immunization clinics, and 3) poor record keeping capabilities. Our idea is unique idea because it simultaneously addresses these three obstacles via a memorable human-centered experience, which is relatively inexpensive and viable to implement. We envision PIC as a “missing link” that can meaningfully connect and encourage a caregiver’s journey from village health works, to clinics, to the home, and back again.

Idea Proposal Stage (Select 1)

  • Prototype: We have done some small tests or experiments with prospective users to continue developing the idea.

How many months are required for the project idea? (140 characters)

It would need to run through the immunization cycle to see if the implementation has worked. (For HepB, it would be 6 months, but varies)

Type of Submitter

  • Other

Organization Location (less than 140 Characters)

New York University

Tell us more about your organization/company (1-2 sentences)

We are part of Design Thinking for Creative Problem Solving in the Graduate Program at NYU's Tandon School of Engineering. We are Design Thinkers trying to solve the issue of the immunization process through a human centered approach.

Who will work alongside your organization in the project idea? (750 characters)

We want to work with youth organizations, clinics, and the healthcare workers in the local area. The youth organizations, such as Ochola Amosiah's "YES" in Uganda can provide photographers to take pictures of the mothers inside the hospital as they wait for immunizations. These groups can also engage with the community through PIC and handing out photo albums to caregivers and educating them about immunizations. The clinic also must engage in the program as they would be providing dates for next immunization on the photos and use the photo album to explain the immunization process to the caregivers. We are happy to work with other idea designers such as Robert Smith's Immunization Shield and global healthcare organizations to grow PIC.

How many people are on your team?

8

Overview of How Your Concept Has Evolved (5-6 sentences):

We had Ongatai from Busia, Uganda (YES) run a prototype of the PIC service in his local immunization clinic. He found that the caregivers (usually mothers) were at first weary of having their picture taken, but after a quick interview about the service, they started posing for our photos. One interesting feedback from caregivers was that they felt more safe when they received the pictures right away during their session at the clinic, so we would love to have a printer at clinics to print out photos. We want to work with printer makers (HP, Canon, Samsung, etc.) to distribute printers throughout clinics. Then the partners can use our service as a cause-marketing campaign, which would benefit both parties.

Viability (3-4 sentences and activity upload):

PIC - Photography in Immunization Clinic Business Canvas. https://canvanizer.com/canvas/rdoQJ2ZhJBm5k

Feasibility (3-4 sentences):

Our service is unique, in that it puts the caregivers in the center of our attention. By providing information about immunization to ease their fears and a memorable experience at the clinic, we believe that it can create a ripple effect within the community. By testing in Busia, Uganda, with the help of YES, we have learned how positively the caregivers reacted when taking pictures with their children. If we had photo printers on site at clinics, we believe that we can improve upon the experience.

Desirability (3-4 sentences and activity upload):

Community Focus (2-3 sentences):

Not only does our service provide a memorable experience with photographs at clinics, we aim to tackle misinformation regarding immunization. Village health workers will be handing out the PIC photo albums, and they will teach the caregivers the truth about immunization and that there is nothing to fear regarding vaccines. The village health workers will be trusted members of each village that have the respect of its people, or local NGO groups. By leveraging existing relationships, we can gain the trust of villagers much more quickly than by being outsiders.

Community Impact (2-3 sentences):

We believe that our service can have a ripple effect in the community. Our service can create a buzz around the community through its service of providing photos at immunization clinics. But moreover, as the village health workers pass on their knowledge regarding vaccines, that knowledge will be much more important in normalizing immunization in rural parts of Africa. We hope to partner with tech companies that can donate printers and cameras and local youth groups that have an interest in photography. With the buy-in from clinics, we believe that it can be a sustainable program.

Attachments (1)

PIC Final Version.pdf

Pages of our PIC photo album that will be distributed by village health workers. The photo album will be used to educate caregivers about immunization and the process, as well as serve as a photo album to keep the photos and keep track when and what types of the immunizations were administered.

45 comments

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Photo of Isaac Jumba
Team

Hi Youngbae Chee  and team, congratulations on refining your idea and testing it out and for partnering with YES. Excited on how you have applied HCD in the process.

Photo of Amanda Patterson, World Relief
Team

Youngbae Chee Anne-Laure Fayard I really like this idea, very creative and very much something that many people in the West take for granted - a simple family photograph album. I would imagine that it would have an exponential effect as one caregiver enthusiastically shares his/her photo with a neighbor with children, etc. You've definitely hit a sweet spot in homing in on caregiver involvement. Excited to see where you will take it in the next few weeks. Will you have pictorials or some other form of keeping track of vaccine schedules if illiteracy rates are high in caregivers? Would love to see a image/video of the prototype in action! Great idea.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Thank you Amanda Patterson, World Relief You can see a first prototype that the Team  developed recently https://youtu.be/KmkBgnha9p8 we would love your feedback on it. We have also shared with some organizations in East Africa.  Our plan is based on the feedback to refine the prototype. If there's a way for you to share with communities on the ground to get their inputs that would be great. Thanks!

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Thank you Amanda Patterson, World Relief You can see a first prototype that the Team  developed recently https://youtu.be/KmkBgnha9p8 we would love your feedback on it. We have also shared with some organizations in East Africa.  Our plan is based on the feedback to refine the prototype. If there's a way for you to share with communities on the ground to get their inputs that would be great. Thanks!

Photo of Amanda Patterson, World Relief
Team

Anne-Laure Fayard Yes, I've had a look at the video found from the comments below, as well as the photo above of your work in Nepal. It's a very engaging idea and seems to be low cost, given that photographers and materials can be easily transported and/or found in rural locations. I know in my experience of taking photos for organizational communication purposes, children and mothers absolutely loved seeing their faces on the camera screen even though they didn't get to take the physical photo home with them. This idea definitely hits on the sentiment of wanting to capture family memories. I'm happy to point this out to our teams in Malawi to see if they have any input. How many health centers are you hoping to gain feedback from? My only thoughts around the album is that most caregivers in rural areas might not be literate (maybe you are focused in areas however where literacy rates are high). While the health workers can read the album/immunization schedules, the rest of the information could potentially be frivolous is there are not enough visuals. Really excited to see the prototype feedback you get on this one, interesting in the African vs. Asian context!

Photo of Priyanka  Vora
Team

Thanks, Amanda. We did multiple prototyping with our users in Uganda and found that they liked the idea of taking the picture with their child. The photo album has pictorial information and is not text heavy (so easy to understand for all). We have created an easy to understand pictorial information booklet for our users which also is a photo album.

Photo of Amanda Patterson, World Relief
Team

@Priyanka Vora, Great job, and best wishes on finalizing your idea today!

Photo of Connie Birchall
Team

I think this is a very cool idea. It would make the immunization process more memorable and would possibly make mothers less nervous about getting their children vaccinated. I think it would give the parents good memories and a good tracking system to tell when their next visit/vaccination should be.

Photo of Priyanka  Vora
Team

Thanks, Connie. Yes, you summarized our idea really. We are turning the photo album- something we never misplace or loose into a record keeping and information booklet. During our user-testing, we found that keeping the pictorial information works well and photos are good conversation starter. Thanks for your comment

Photo of Annie Tan
Team

I think this is a really interesting idea. It tackles a problem from a unique point of view, focusing specifically on making the whole experience a little more positive and more memorable. When I think about vaccinations, I don't usually have happy memories. Like you guys brought up already, there are always long lines, no individual interest in clients, etc. Even for me, I love pushing off getting vaccinations because it's just such a hassle, and I don't associate it with anything positive. The idea you propose is really creative, and it's something the Western world wouldn't appreciate as much because photos not special to us. But for the demographic you are targeting, it is clear that they would appreciate the opportunity to capture a special moment with their children. By incentivizing them in such a way, you are able to tackle the issue by changing the sentiment surrounding the whole problem. Definitely not something I would have otherwise thought about. I am excited to see where this goes!

Photo of Priyanka  Vora
Team

Thanks Annie.
All the user-testing we did so far show that caregivers are really excited about having a photo of their babies taken at the clinic. The album we proposed also acts as a boundary object to start a conversation around immunization. We hope that once a few caregivers have a positive experience at the clinic they will talk to other caregivers and the photo at the clinic will help to reinforce the idea. Also the fact that the baby will have a healthy growth over the course of the immunization will help health workers to ward off myths and misinformation. Thanks for writing to us

Photo of Shahed Alam
Team

Youngbae Chee I liked how you are turning a tiring experience into a memorable one. It'd be a precious artifact for the baby to go through in later point in time. Does the back of the photo card have information about the particular vaccination done during that visit? Also, what other kinds of information is mentioned on it?

Photo of Youngbae Chee
Team

Our prototype version has a dedicated page for each visit the caregiver makes to the clinic with the child. The page will have the photo from the visit as well as all of the vaccines administered on that date. The page will also have the current date and a future date for the caregivers to return to the clinic for future rounds of vaccinations.
The front pages of the photo album will have information about immunizations, why they are important, and how we can take pre-emptive measure to prevent diseases from occurring in the future.

Thank you for your interest in our project and your kind words!

Photo of Aayush Shah
Team

I really like the idea of providing a sentimental album for families to keep track of immunization and for them to know their upcoming dates and remaining vaccines. When looking at your work I realized that one thing that I always found lacking about the vaccination process was the naming of the diseases I was getting vaccines for as many parents often might not be aware of, know or even be able to relate to the many diseases that vaccines help prevent. When I saw the video of the prototype you guys uploaded I noticed the many names of the vaccines - HPV, DPT-Hep-Hib, BCG etc. and maybe one way for parents to actually be able to relate more to the process and understand the importance of this for their children would be for them to actually know and understand the bad diseases and conditions that these vaccines help eradicate, so if the album had a guide or short brief for each vaccine required that might be immensely helpful for parents.

Photo of Youngbae Chee
Team

Hi Aayush, thank you for your interest and feedback on PIC!
Yes, we wanted to create a human experience for the mothers visiting the hospitals for immunization. We heard from our partners at Uganda, that Ugandan mothers see hospitals as "a place people go to die". We wanted to counter this idea by creating a warming environment for the mothers and children.
We are prototyping the PIC service with village health workers in mind. The village health workers will visit families and use the photo album to describe the immunizations and immunization process to the mothers to make it seem less threatening and so that the mothers can see the value of immunization. We are in the process of developing visual guides to help the mothers as well.

Photo of Garrett  Ienner
Team

Dear all,

We wanted to share the link to our PIC video prototype and would love to hear any feedback you make have. Thank you for your time!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DvfM12uB1pBiM2tCOGfpKQZF9TJN9xXJ/view

Best,
Garrett

Anne-Laure Fayard Isaac Jumba Manisha Laroia Ashley Tillman 

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Thank you Team for sharing your prototype. Really impressive work and I know the iterations that went into it. I love the physical artifact and the explanatory video. I also like the fact that you've been thinking both of the caregivers (the photo makes the experience less stressful and even pleasing at the clinic, encourages them to come back for the next photo and also provide a reminder) and of the health workers (who can use the booklet to explain the process but also to check the status of each children). I even wonder if the front part of the booklet could not be used as part of their training. What do you think Ochola Amosiah I know you watched a first version of the video. I also remember you told the teams that caregivers would love to have a picture of your children. I wonder if you can also see the value for health workers - both for discussing with caregivers about immunization and also reminding their next shots.
Isaac Jumba I wonder if there's any way for you to share with organizations involved in immunization in Kenya. Manisha Laroia would love your feedback too and maybe the feedback from India-based organizations. Ashley Tillman your feedback is always welcome!

Photo of Ruolin  Gou
Team

Dear all,

For your convenience, you can also watch the video prototype through Youtube.

https://youtu.be/KmkBgnha9p8

Best,
Ruolin

Photo of abhishek gore
Team

Hello Youngbae Chee
My idea is very much the same as yours. One of the very main difference is that my idea focuses on causing a ripple effect and inspiring communities as in the Indian context the main reason that caregivers immunize their wards is trust that comes mostly because others in the community do the same. In such a scenario the goal becomes easy once the process is initiated. The proposed idea also tries to facilitate this initiation.
It would be helpful if you give it a glance.
https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/briefsgates-vaccine-innovation/ideas/photograph/comments#c-7d71341ad8c9e8039bfd5915c17b7a4e

Also, I will be happy to work together if possible.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

abhishek gore Thank you for the ping. I think that trust was also an element that Team Youngbae Chee was trying to address by making the experience at the clinics more enjoyable. I think trust is definitely crucial. The second element PIC is trying to address is providing education and reminders so that caregivers stay involved during the whole immunization journey. I'm curious to know if you've talked with some clinics or organizations in India. Looking forward to seeing how this conversation evolves.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Team make sure to check this idea https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/briefsgates-vaccine-innovation/ideas/vazzle-vaccine-puzzle The focus there is on the incentive for caregivers. I wonder if having a new picture of their child is a strong enough incentive for caregivers. It'd be worth testing this assumption. Ochola Amosiah is it frequent for families to have photos of their children taken? If not, do you think it is something that families will like. I found that it was something important for families in Nepal but I'm curious if you could ask some of the families YES is working with. Thanks!

Photo of Robert Smith
Team

Hi @PIC - Photos in Immunization Clinic team,

This idea has shaped up really well, nice job!
Best of luck moving into the Refinement round! -Robert

Photo of Youngbae Chee
Team

Hi Robert,

Thank you for your taking your time to read our idea, as well as your comments.
Best of luck to you as well!

Photo of Robert Smith
Team

Hi Youngbae Chee 
Thanks for inviting me onto your team! I look forward to watching @PIC - Photos in Immunization Clinic grow!

Photo of Robert Smith
Team

Hi Youngbae Chee ,
Your idea's emphasis on using photographs for rewarding and reminding families about getting their child immunized is very insightful!
Your idea inspired mine, Immunization Shield , and it's been suggested by the challenge team that 'Shield' could supplement yours.
'Shield' graphically depicts the status of a child's immunization history by having specific locations for sticker/stamp/photo records for ALL vaccinations a child will ever need in their region, while, if I understand it, PIC works the immunization strategy chronologically, focusing on the next shot.
Perhaps working both approaches simultaneously could improve the effectiveness of each.
Let me know if you see any opportunity here. Thanks, Robert

Photo of Priyanka  Vora
Team

Hi Robert,
Thank you so much for your comment. Our team also thinks that graphics/images can help explain the complicated nuances and schedule of immunization. Do you have any suggestions on how we can build this further? We would love to hear more. With PIC, we want to change the immunization experience and using photographs seemed appropriate through our research. Happy to talk more. THANKS!

Photo of Robert Smith
Team

Hi Priyanka,
Thanks for your interest!
Perhaps the photos you take could fit into a regionally-customized ‘snapshot template’ of sorts that identified ALL the required immunizations for a given child. The blank spots would then clearly show those vaccinations that had yet to be administered.
Just a thought... Robert

Photo of Robert Smith
Team

Priyanka,

Another thought- maybe these ‘photo-templates’ could be two pages inside a protected folder that could be closed (like a book) for protected transport or opened for display on a wall or sitting propped open on a table/shelf.
- Robert

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Robert Smith I really like this idea. We talked with Team yesterday about the possibility of having a folder or binder that would be like a book. But I also like the idea of being able to display it. It connects to one of my conversations with Isaac Jumba above. Something I can imagine the team prototyping in the coming weeks.

Photo of Robert Smith
Team

Hi Anne-Laure Fayard 

I could imagine a folder with pre-punched photo pockets that stands on its own (like a diptych), or that could hang flat on a wall.
Looking forward to seeing an early low-fidelity model from the team!

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Team Check this idea https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/briefsgates-vaccine-innovation/ideas/shishu-sui-aur-dhaga-the-child-thread-and-needle I really like the material aspect and while different it reminded me your idea.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Youngbae Chee and team Thank you for sharing your idea. I really like its simplicity but also its potential impact. The idea tackles both negative experience at the clinic and reminding calendar dates for next vaccines (record keeping). PIC would make the experience of caregivers while at the clinic more enjoyable (reducing perception of waiting time, providing a happy memory, etc.) while creating an artifact that can be used as a reminder (we can imagine mothers will cherish and keep which includes the date of the immunization as well as the next date of immunization.). I can see this being easily prototyped in a clinic with the help of a local organization (for example a youth organization) with a couple of polaroid cameras. You could imagine taking two pictures: one for the caregiver to take home and one to be kept at the clinic for record keeping (and families might feel proud to be part of the exhibition. It might also create a peer-to-peer accountability system).
I have done a smaller scale version in Nepal (thanks for using the pictures) and we realized that many mothers did not have pictures of their children and were very excited to share first and keep them after. We had a youth from the local youth club taking the pictures and he was very engaged and committed. I'd be curious to see if it would work in a different cultural context and in the clinic context.
You mention that you are also tackling misinformation and I'm not sure what part of the idea is doing this. I would encourage to clarify in your description the main pain points you are addressing (there are "hidden" in the text and I know them because we talked about it). I'm not sure it is so clear for other community members. I know you're working on the user experience map. I think this will also help.
Isaac Jumba Ashley Tillman Karine Sarkissian any feedback? clarification questions? suggestions? Ochola Amosiah curious to have your feedback too. Is this something you could imagine prototyping in a clinic of your district with some of the youth groups you are working with? If they had some polaroid cameras and films (of course!).
Looking forward to seeing the idea evolve.

Photo of Youngbae Chee
Team

We aim to tackle disinformation by showcasing the actual information in the brochures. The healthcare workers can tell the families about the truths regarding immunizations, and the brochure will provide visualizations about the whole process of immunizing the child. We do not want to spread more false rumors, so we will advise the healthcare workers to only speak the facts and not mention rumors. Our research has shown us that having a unified message across many platforms will help clarify the information regarding immunizations.

Photo of Ochola Amosiah
Team

Youngbae chee,
The design process here could have missed some information that you can fix some where for example, the problem is not with the caregivers, but the immunization propagandist instigation of the public with false information and yet they dont even visit the vaccination centre. So these brochures need to target the propaganda constituency, my fear no method of solely picking them for education because they need face to face interaction or discipline.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Thank you for this clarification Youngbae Chee Wenlu Xu Ruolin Gou Priyanka and Garrett, you might want to clarify in your text as I thought the main focus was on the photo booth at the clinics providing a nicer experience and creating reminders for the caregivers (and you could imagine a copy kept at the clinic). I think asking
I really recommend using the user experience map to help other community members understand better the whole journey.
Check Ochola Amosiah h idea https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/briefsgates-vaccine-innovation/ideas/promoting-community-capacity-in-immunization-governance/ as there are some interesting synergies esp. the cards (see the point about having 3 copies of each). Thanks!

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Ochola, I would love to make sure I understand your point. Are you suggesting that the lack of education / misinformation is greater (and / or more damaging at the level of the health workers than at the level of the caregivers? From our research it seems that caregivers also lack education and have misconceptions and fears due to lack of information or wrong information. Looking forward to further clarification. Thanks!

Photo of Priyanka  Vora
Team

Dear Anne-Laure,
Yes! We propose a parallel campaign ideally on the radio to communicate with the families about PIC and use that opportunity to explain the benefits of vaccination. My team strongly felt that a communication campaign would help to address the community as a whole. But, we also want to distribute brochures/sleeves for photographs that can be handed over to mothers. These brochures will have pictorial messaging that explains vaccine and using them as a sleeve for storing photos that they click at the clinic will ensure they are not lost. Also, the photos will track the physical growth of the children which will be excellent proof for the mother to trust vaccines. Any thoughts ?

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Hi Ochola Amosiah thank you for your feedback. Just to make sure I understand your comment: you are suggesting that the issue is not about informing caregivers but educating health workers who don't provide the right information? From their research Youngbae Chee Team have found that while lack of education of health workers was an issue, parents who went to the clinics often time did not go back (long wait, misinformation, etc.) and that also they did not trust the health workers. So the idea here was to focus on this second problem and there was also the idea to create a better relationship with the health workers as they would provide this more visual booklet as well as with the opportunity of having a photo album of the child. However, yesterday we also thought that the booklet could be useful to educate health workers themselves and that it could be part of the training you have in your idea. What do you think?

Photo of Isaac Jumba
Team

Hi Youngbae Chee  and team, really exciting to read your idea. Your team has done an amazing job starting out with research and coming with a solution that can easily be tested in different contexts. I also like the possible collaboration that you might look into with Immunization Shield and other ideas on the platform. I also like the additional comments given on your ideas, example by Karine Sarkissian .

Since you are planning to collaborate with some organizations based in East Africa, is it possible to think around what aspects of your solution you may be testing? What are the questions you would wish answered? Are there also any ideas on how the excitement can last beyond the clinics (back at home)? I'm thinking the photos /information can always be used during informal gatherings for caregivers.

Photo of Anne-Laure Fayard
Team

Hi Isaac Jumba jumping in the conversation regarding the sustainability of the idea (aka how the excitement can last beyond clinics): the idea is that the mothers / caregivers will take home a picture of their children that others in the community can see it (we are hoping that they might hang it on a wall ... maybe we could think of a nice frame). Parents could keep all the pictures of their children. When I did the photo booths with women in Nepal, they were all very excited to be able to keep the picture (many said they did not have any picture of their children) but also liked sharing / showing during the event (we had a mini-exhibition). With the team, we talked about the possibility of (1) giving the possibility to mothers to have the pictures exhibited during their wait at the clinic (some sort of pop-up exhibit during the waiting time) and / or (2) a more long-term exhibit at the clinic which would also create some peer-accountability.
We discussed yesterday a couple of things the team could prototype. Either having a small pilot with the photo taking in a clinic... if Ochola Amosiah and some of the YES youth group was interested. We could test the interest of mothers for having the pictures of their children.
It will allow the team to explore further Karine Sarkissian 's comments.
Another thing we discussed was also maybe working with Robert Smith on prototyping the visualization for the booklet. We're imaging a variation of the immunization shield in the back and a space of the photo at the front. This will allow the team to test the format and the look and feel of the photo album while also starting looking at the information that needs to be included.

Photo of Ashley Tillman
Team

Hi Youngbae Chee excited to see some great conversations happening. Ochola Amosiah had some interesting feedback for your idea to share.

Photo of Karine Sarkissian
Team

Hi Team! As per Anne-Laure Fayard suggestion- I wanted to make some recommendations! I think the idea is great, it does make it a lot more relatable. I would consider a few additional factors- what if a mother does not want to be photographed? Perhaps the child can draw a photo of them and their parent? Also, the photo does not provide any information- how do you tackle language barriers? Illiteracy? Perhaps you have the photo giveaway attached to a pictogram with the process and things to do to take care of the child? Think of how you could insert the photo as an additive to the information pictogram. Also- is there something you can do to value the child and parent relationship? Maybe a child of the month (without favoritism...)
Just a few things to consider- can you take the idea further? Think about language barriers, added information, and a way to value the child-parent relationship and the friendly approach of the clinic. Good luck!

Photo of Youngbae Chee
Team

Hi Karine, thank you for taking your time to review our idea.
While the photos themselves do not carry any information, the back of the photo will have the current date and the date of the next immunization cycle. In addition, we proposed a visual brochure of the immunization process. The brochure may be explained by a local healthcare worker visiting families and telling them about immunizations. This verbal explanation coupled with the visuals by the brochure may help tackle the language barriers. Also the brochure will have pockets in them for the mothers to keep the photos in one place.
We will keep in mind about the issue of mothers not wanting to be photographed. But the brochure may still be useful in delivering information regarding immunization to families.

Photo of Ochola Amosiah
Team

Hi, team didn't get it well if you answered the duration of the project

Photo of Youngbae Chee
Team

Thank you for your feedback.
The duration may vary because of the different immunization schedules. We want to see if the mothers, after a good first immunization experience will return for their next cycle of immunizations. For most vaccines, the schedule is at 2 months, 2nd dosage at 4 months, and 3rd dose at 6 ~ 15 months. Therefore, we updated the length of time to 6 months.