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Tree-planting drones for restoring mangroves and protecting livelihoods in Myanmar

Saving lives and fighting climate change by rapidly regrowing the forests of vulnerable coastline communities in Myanmar with drones.

Photo of Irina Fedorenko

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*Please Upload User Experience Map (as attachment) and any additional Beneficiary Feedback in this field

Explain your project idea in two sentences.

Building bridges between community driven mangrove restoration, innovative technology and big data. Benefiting communities in Myanmar, increasing fish stock and reducing the impact of climate change.

What is your organization name? Explain your organization in one sentence.

Worldview International Foundation (Yangon), BioCarbon Engineering (Oxford) and Route2 (London).

Is this project idea new for you or your organization? If no, how much have you already executed on?

We have developed a strategic partnership between the three organizations that are the leaders on their fields. WIF has 5+ years of community work and mangrove planting in Myanmar, BCE has 3+ years of ecosystem restoration and Route2 has a portfolio of clients that include PwC and the Crown Estate.

What is the problem you aim to solve with this idea? How would you define this problem as urgent and a priority in your target community?

The mangrove ecosystems are vital for protecting the coastal communities in a fragile state. Myanmar has already lost over 1 million hectares of forest and globally mangrove forests are disappearing 3 times faster than rainforests especially in view of sea level rise and fish stock depletion.

What is the timeline for your project idea? What are the key steps for implementation in the next 1-3 years?

Yr1 BCE - trial of tree planting drones at project site and training of local teams. WIF - collection of seeds and raw materials and training of marine science teams. Route2 - ‘Ground Up’ design of the ecosystem service assessment and evaluation standard and associated economic valuation models Yr2 BCE- deployment of tree planting drones in the delta region WIF -production of seeds pods with local teams Route2-deployment of the standard Yr3 All- post-planting monitoring.

Describe the individual or team that will implement this idea (if a partnership, please explain breakdown of responsibility).

WIF -building local partnerships in Myanmar with leading coastal universities, the Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry, and coastal communities. BCE is responsible for the deployment of the tree planting drone technology, Route 2 will develop the evaluation standard.

What do you need the most support with in this project idea?

  • Business Development/Partnerships

What is your primary goal over the next 6 weeks of Refinement?

  • Collaborate with others in the sector

How do you currently measure (or plan to measure) results for this project?

The successful expansion requires further financial incentives. To this end, and Route2’s role, is the design, development, and implementation of a new ecosystem service assessment and evaluation standard and tradeable token, using blockchain distributed ledger technology. This standard will ascertain the annual economic value of ecosystem services delivered by the forests that we restore, which will enable to make it sustainable and incentivise stewardship and forest expansion.

How has your project proposal changed due to your user research during the Beneficiary Feedback Phase?

We have realised the importance of monitoring our impact and measuring our success over the lifetime of the project, and therefore approached and secured Route2 as our partner to develop the standard and mint to ESCs. We have therefore modified our project proposal based on our user research during the Beneficiary Feedback Phase.

(Optional) What are some of your still unanswered questions or concerns about this idea?

If BCE’s mission to help WIF plant 1 billion trees is achieved, it will be significant in addressing negative climate effects by naturally sequestering more than 1 billion ton of CO2 over the first 20 years of ground operations. However, we will need a lot more support and resources to plant 1 billion mangrove trees in the Delta Region of Myanmar in an area of 250,000 ha and annually monitor the total economic value of the restored ecosystems using the ESS.

We are building a strong collaboration between three partners to restore degraded and deforested lands by planting one billion trees per year around the world and we are going to start with restoring degraded mangrove ecosystems and providing sustainable livelihoods and security to the most vulnerable communities living in the Delta Region of Myanmar. 


This idea is a collaboration between a social enterprise BioCarbon Engineering (BCE) based in Oxford, a management consulting firm Route2 based in London, and an NGO Worldview International Foundation (WIF) based in Yangon that tackles the problem of environmental degradation, loss of livelihoods and conflict resolution. This collaboration of three strategic partners addresses the big problem by restoring degraded mangrove ecosystems rapidly on the large scale basis using tree-planting drones while working with local communities to rebuild peace, ensure mangrove forests preservation and building a robust green economy. The project intersects the three topics of peace, prosperity, and planet. 


Explain your idea

In Myanmar it is estimated that 75% of the game fish and 90% of the commercial species in certain areas rely on mangrove ecosystems. Mangroves also serve as physical coastal barriers that can absorb extreme wave and storm activity and oceanic surges. Without mangroves to protect coastlines from such damage human lives can be imperiled, as occurred in 2008 when Cyclone Nargis hit the coastal areas where there was no longer any mangrove protection and more than 150,000 people were killed and millions were affected. WIF has been maintaining peace in the land of conflict that has been ruled by the brutal military junta for the last 50 years and it has been helping with the democratic transition of Aung San Suu Kyi party the National League of Democracy that was born in Oxford. WIF does so by restoring the coastal ecosystems of Myanmar and working with local communities on environmental stewardship and creation of sustainable livelihoods. As part of this collaboration the three strategic partners propose to scale up the mangrove restoration project with the aid of BSE, that invented the technology of using drones for good - to restore damaged and degraded ecosystems. Our collective idea is to deploy new technology in fighting climate change by using tree-planting drones to rapidly regrow the forests of the tide at the mangrove restoration project site in the Delta Region of Myanmar. The WIF team started the pilot project with two local universities to restore 750 ha of mangrove forest back in 2012 and it has planted 2.7 million trees so far. The target for 2017 is to scale the project up by planting 1 million new mangrove trees in another 250 ha of degraded land. WIF now requires a total landscape restoration approach in an area of 4100 ha in the delta region. Surveying is crucial for the project but scaling up the pilot project is very labour intensive and complex as the target area is huge comprising 5 coastal villages.  BCE technology works in two phases. First, fixed wing mapping drones fly 100m above the ground and take highly detailed images of the land (3-5cm resolution). This image data is then crunched using machine learning algorithms, and creates a planting pattern to pinpoint the best places to plant and the best species to plant in each location. In phase two, the mapping information is uploaded into a multirotor planting drone, that flies at 2m above the ground, and plants its seedpods at the locations specified by the map. This approach greatly improves survival rates, while designing multiple mangrove species planting patterns to protect and expand biodiversity while rebuilding ecosystems. It is crucial to speed up the mangroves restoration project as it is such a slow and human intensive process implementing the project in the remote areas of Myanmar. The BCE technology would allow the WIF team to plant forests 10 times faster and at least 50% cheaper, so the local team can focus on community building and forest stewardship.

Who Benefits?

The beneficiaries of this project are the most vulnerable people living on the coastline of the Delta Region of Myanmar who have been suffering from the impact of climate change and conflicts over the years. The project will be implemented in line with achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, in addition to effective mitigation of CO2 contributing to the 2015 UN Paris Climate Agreement. It will prevent ecological collapse and provide valuable synergetic benefits: Provide up to 50% more seafood with better and secured breeding habitat, Sequestrate up to five times more CO2 than rainforest trees and reduce escalations of climate change, Create high value-added livelihood opportunities to disadvantaged coastal communities by reducing poverty – especially among women –by raising orchids, collecting nypa palm sap and bee honey, and providing other new sources of revenue, Save lives and improve environmental health for millions of people in adaptation to climate change,

How is your idea unique?

BCE technology is enabling tree planting cheaper, faster and on a scale that has not been previously possible. The company's approach to ecosystem restoration is driven by science and data, and will enable decision-makers to choose the most appropriate species for their locations. The idea to restore mangrove forests, is unique because it employs innovative technology and leads to multiple benefits - by radically cutting costs for tree planting, it enables to redirect the funds for community development and employment, and peace building. Additionally, mangrove forests are the vital foundation for a complex marine food web, sustaining not only fisheries but many forms of bird and other wildlife. However, mangroves have also become the target of various coastal projects that require the destruction of the mangroves, including the production of charcoal by extremely poor local families who suffer nomadic and unreliable existences. This project reimagines this future.

Idea Proposal Stage

  • Piloting: I have started to implement my solution as a whole with a first set of real users.

Tell us more about you

WIF became a partner with Mission Blue in 2015 for cooperation in establishing effective mangrove mitigation projects to combat climate change and to support vulnerable coastal communities with long-term sustainable development. Since 2012, WIF has planted 2.7 million mangrove trees. Parallel with mangrove restoration, the project is empowering the local communities with livelihoods and sustainable development including public education and environmental awareness, as vital components for long term success. This also includes the establishment of community energy forests and introduction of fuel saving stoves including community solar energy units for cost efficiency and improved living conditions. The partnership in Myanmar with leading coastal universities, the Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry (MOECAF) and coastal communities, has opened large potentials in promoting adaptation to climate change. WIF has undertaken a new restoration project on 2500 ha on the request of the MOECAF, including another request by Myeik University to support developing a new mangrove park of 1600 ha. There is also an ongoing process for developing a REDD+ initiative on 25,000 ha in protecting standing mangrove forests and another 7500 ha for restoration. Route2’s foundations are economics and ecosystems. The Founder, Dr. Daniel Lopez Dias completed his PhD under the auspices of Dr. Robert Costanza at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, which involved advising President Obama’s Climate Action Plan. Route2 is a data and analytics business providing advisory environmental economic services to an established range of clients including: The Crown Estate, PwC, SGS, and Yorkshire Water. Route2 recently provided the full spatial and economic valuation of the United Kingdom’s coastal ecosystems. BCE is an Oxford-based social enterprise which aims to plant 1 billion trees a year around the world. Since it’s conception in 2014, BCE grew from an idea to a company with 10 highly qualified full-time employees and 2 consultants. Most of the employees hold PhDs from top Universities and have experience in ecosystem restoration around the world. WIF sees significant applications of BCE Technology in the work that it does in Myanmar. If BCE’s mission to help plant 1 billion trees is achieved, it will be significant in addressing negative climate effects by naturally sequestering more than 1 billion ton of CO2 over the first 20 years of operations. http://www.biocarbonengineering.com http://www.wif.care http://www.route2.com

Expertise in sector

  • 7+ years

Organization Filing Status

  • Yes, we are a registered non-profit.
  • Yes, we are a registered social enterprise.
  • Yes, we are a registered company.
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Attachments (8)

Thor-Heyerdahl-ClimatePark-Final.pdf

WIF Report on Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park

Community participation and awareness.pdf

Master's Thesis on interviews of the beneficiaries from project site collected between 2014 - 2015

First-Report-for-Letten-Foundation.pdf

WIF Executive Summary of 3 years research project supported by Letten Foundation Norway

Mangrove Reb report.pdf

Validation Report done by Dr. Cameron Richards from Raintrust Sustainable Ventures in 2016

Soil Carbon Magyi.pdf

Soil Carbon report done by marine scientists from Pathein University led by Prof. Htay Aung in 2015

106 comments

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Photo of Carmen
Team

I really like the project and the fact that you combined an existing but rather new technology - the drones - with an existing problem - the decreasing natural occurrence of Mangrove trees.
The idea of tree-planting with drones in order to restore Mangroves is such a resourceful and bright idea - the people in Myanmar will appreciate that for sure. It is great that you are aiming to save lives and fight climate change at the same time. Good luck for proceeding with your project!

Photo of Catherine Kamping
Team

This is such a wonderful project! I went to the project site in Myanmar in 2015, and joined the local people as they plant the mangroves in the refo site.

The project is indeed making contribution not just on the aspect of climate change and environmental proctection but it it is also making a big impact on social development as it create awareness in the lives of the people in the community as they become educated with the pressing issues that affects not just their community but as well as their lives and future.

I have witnessed the passion, dedication and commitment the project have created in the hearts of the local people as they contribute their time and energy in planting the mangroves.

It was a heart warming experience and would love to go back again someday and see how the mangroves are growing and the people are doing! And maybe see how more I could be of help.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Irina,

It is great to see the updates on your project.

Would you tell me more about the number of local jobs that would be created in yr1,2 and 3?

Would you tell me more about the Route2 ‘ecosystem service assessment and evaluation standard and tradable token, using blockchain distributed ledger technology’ what specifically would you be measuring? How would this relate to the expected results from the project? Would the traceable tokens be used by Ah Moon?

Do you have any quotes from local individuals on the benefits of the mangroves for their livelihoods?

Are there certain types of organisations or organisations working in specific geographies that you are keen to connect to?

If you have any questions at all, please tag me using ‘@‘ and ‘Kate Rushton’ or send me an email - krushton@ideo.com

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your good questions Kate and I really appreciate it. I have answered them all in detail and uploaded them on the document section of this page marked as "Answers to Kate" for our supporters, beneficiaries and experts to read. I hope that they provide more feedback so that we can further develop and improve on what we started as a pilot project back in 2012 to help the most vulnerable people living in the Delta Region of Myanmar. As part of the journey in the land of gold http://thorheyerdahlclimatepark.org/ was created by WIF to address the impact of climate change locally working in partnership with the local communities living around the mangrove project site.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

For everyone to read and understand our Plan of Action I am also posting the answers here on the comments section.

1. Would you tell me more about the number of local jobs that would be created in yr1, 2 and 3?

We anticipate to creating 1 local job per ha of degraded mangrove land that we restore doing year 1 to 3 to help our local project team with seed collection for preparing the seed pods in order to plant 4000 trees per ha using the tree-planting drones. So if we plant 1 million new mangrove trees in 250 ha of degraded land we will be creating 250 new local jobs in the community to help maintain, monitor and protect the newly restored mangrove ecosystems in the Delta Region of Myanmar.

2. Would you tell me more about the Route2 ‘ecosystem service assessment and evaluation standard and tradable token, using blockchain distributed ledger technology’ what specifically would you be measuring? How would this relate to the expected results from the project? Would the traceable tokens be used by the locals?

We would be measuring the economic benefit of the ecosystem services [ES] generated by the ecosystem, for example the coastal protection services provided by a mangrove ecosystem.

Clearly these benefits are ‘external benefits’ and therefore the landowners receive no financial compensation and therefore no incentive to maintain the integrity and functioning off the ecosystem.

The standard and coin, following the movement of Payment For Ecosystem Services aims to halt and reverse this trend.

Step 1:

Involves [Route2] performing a baseline Ecosystem Service Assessment & Evaluation [ES-A&E] of the designated ecosystem.

This baseline ESAE provides a spatially explicit understanding of ecosystem condition and the annual economic benefit of the ecosystem specific identified ecosystem services.

This annual benefit is that translated into a 50 year benefit (following the Natural Capital Protocol)

Producing this baseline and value is the aforementioned standard.

Step 2:

Involves [Route2] securing a lease on the ecosystem services title (most likely the land title) from the land owner (the Government of Myanmar) in return for financial payment.

Step 3:

Involves the securitisation of these leased ecosystem service benefits. Using blockchain technology, the ecosystem as a hectare of land is considered as a tradable (digital) asset (such as an ES Coin) that can appreciate or depreciate in value according to market dynamics.

Blockchain provides the following benefits:

- Impossibility of counterfeit
- Immutability
- Disintermediation and ease of transfer
- Transparency and ease of auditing
- Transaction processing costs dramatically reduced

Step 4:

Involves the market of these assets to corporates (in the offset market), institutional investors and consumers.

Demand will be driven by:

1. Corporate desire to offset ecological damage - a concept proven by voluntary carbon offset markets

2. Institutional investor social impact mandates

3. Consumer appetite for alternative investment strategies (e.g. bitcoin etc.)

Step 5:

A business model surplus will be distributed to land managers (for land management). We understand communities directly dependent on the ecosystem to be the designated land managers for example those recruited from our target villages.

The distributed surplus could be paid in local currency or the digitised asset (i.e. ES Coin) through a blockchain wallet to the locals and all the members of the community who are working to protect the restored mangrove ecosystems for generations to come.

Please note, that these steps are subject to change. Investment would be used to develop and concretise the model structure. These steps do not include other necessary business activities such as seed funds.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

3. Do you have any quotes from local individuals on the benefits of the mangroves for their livelihoods?

We have taken the quotes from a chapter of a Master's Thesis done by Jonathan Lindstrom, a visiting research scholar from the Life Science University Norway back in 2014 - 2015 while he was at the project site in Myanmar.

Please note that when we did these interviews we agreed they would be done anonymous, so the local people could speak more freely. This was done before Myanmar had become as democratic as it is today, and freedom of speech was an unfamiliar thing for most people. We had to protect their identity.

83 year old lady that had lived in Shwethaunyan village her whole life had a vivid recollection of the past: “There was an abundance before, of both fish and fruits. We did not even need a market because everyone was sharing with each other and we all had enough. Now there are no forest or fish, higher prices and a lot of trouble”.

45 year old fisherman was quoted saying “Before I could catch up to 20kg a day. Now I am lucky if I get more than 1kg”.

37 year old lady shopkeeper was quoted saying “A healthy forest leads to a healthy society”.

32 year old fisherman was quoted saying “Mangroves are very important for the fish”, and another fisherman said that “Mangroves protect us from wind and waves”.

49 year old fisher woman was quoted saying “Before I used mangrove trees and branches, now I collect coconut husks and driftwood.”

49 year old fisher woman was among those who helped plant seedlings was quoted saying “Participating in the reforestation is very good because I get knowledge on the importance of mangroves and I learned how to plant trees.”

25 year old woman was quoted saying “It was a very good experience, I felt like a responsible person, not as a worker”.

2 farmers were quoted saying “Efficient stoves are very good! They make cooking easier and we use less firewood” and “I never thought about using less wood”.

32 year old fisherman was quoted saying “This (a community forest) could be very positive because the whole society could benefit from the resources”.

4. Are there certain types of organisations or organisations working in specific geographies that you are keen to connect to?

Worldview International Foundation (WIF) as its partners are keen to connect with the World Food Programme (WFP) and the Green Climate Fund (GCF) to scale up mangrove restoration and address food security in the context of sea level rise from the impact of climate change.

WIF is also keen to connect with the Global Mangrove Alliance that is committed to expanding the global extent of mangrove habitat by 20% by the year 2030 in partnership with Conservation International, WWF and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).

Photo of Seth Itzkan
Team

Dear Bremley Lyngdoh and Irina Fedorenko,

Your mangrove restoration idea warms my heart and I am honored and delighted to count you as friends and colleagues. Thank you. Although the total mangrove area is small, on a per-area basis, they are probably the most bio-diverse and carbon capturing intensive ecosystems on the planet. We must restore them.

As you know, the organization I helped start, Soil4Climate, https://www.facebook.com/groups/Soil4Climate/, advocates for soil as a climate solution. We will be happy to promote this vital mangrove project. Please let us know how else we can help.

Thank you again for your extraordinary work. Together we will restore the ecosystems that keep our planet livable. Peace, love and gratitude, - Seth

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Dear Seth,

Both Irina and myself really value your feedback and we look forward to building a strong partnership with your team at https://soil4climate.org/

We are glad to know that you will be participating at the Caux Dialogue on Land and Security (CDLS) 2017, hosted by Initiatives for Land, Lives, and Peace (ILLP) next month in Switzerland. CDLS 2017 will focus on tackling land degradation and conflict, and advance the global discourse on best practice for implementing successful initiatives and investments. http://www.caux.ch/cdls-2017-programme

It is slowly dawning on the world that land degradation is a serious issue, and from the UNCCD to Afr100, a plethora of initiatives have been born to try to turn the tide. But even the most visionary of them seem to deliver very modest outcomes: for example, the international community has a goal for Land Degradation Neutrality, but not for Land Restoration. And yet the promise that lies in being more ambitious is immense: we can, and should, restore most of the degraded ecosystems of the earth. This strand will explore the challenges and the promises – environmental, social and economic – of a full ecosystemic approach to land use.

We look forward to rallying support for this important mangrove restoration project in Myanmar when we get to Switzerland next month. Thank you so much again for your support in promoting this life saving initiative at Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park in the Delta Region of Myanmar.

With commitment - Bremley

Photo of Jennifer Small
Team

This is an incredibly significant and timely project, with valuable impacts both on a local and global level. Thank you for the creativity and drive to bring this project to life!

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your inputs Jennifer and I am delighter to know that PADI has recently partnered with Mission Blue to raise awareness about Hope Spots.

We look forward to collaborating with your team as showcase the Andaman Islands Hope Spot and the great work that is taking place in the region across PADI’s social channels.

Our mangrove restoration project in the Delta Region of Myanmar faces the Andaman Sea and we have some amazing coral reefs with perfect diving spots. We are working hard with the local communities to protect these amazing marine ecosystems as we battle for the planet in our local fight against global climate change.

Photo of Brett Garling
Team

A fantastic and important idea whose time has come -- way to go and can't wait to see the impact going into the future. Hats off!

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your support Brett and it is an honour to partner with your team at Mission Blue https://www.mission-blue.org

I am grateful for the partnership you have created globally and for promoting our mangrove restoration work at Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park in Myanmar on your platform https://www.mission-blue.org/2015/05/regrowing-forests-of-the-tide/

I am glad the Ocean Conference you participate on 5-9 June 2017 at the Untied Nations when off well and I am happy to see the Call to Action on Our Ocean - Our Future clearly stating the importance of protecting blue carbon ecosystems such as mangroves.

(k) Develop and implement effective adaptation and mitigation measures that contribute to increasing and supporting resilience to ocean and coastal acidification, sea-level rise, and increase in ocean temperatures, and to addressing the other harmful impacts of climate change on the ocean as well as coastal and blue carbon ecosystems such as mangroves, tidal marshes, seagrass, and coral reefs, and wider interconnected ecosystems impacting on our ocean, and ensure the implementation of relevant obligations and commitments.

Source: https://oceanconference.un.org/callforaction

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Irina and Team!

We’re excited to share with you feedback and questions from the BridgeBuilder team and an external set of experts. We encourage you to think about this feedback as you continue to improve and refine your idea. You are welcome to respond in the comments section and/or to incorporate feedback into the text of your idea. Your idea and all associated comments will all be reviewed during the final review process.

One expert shared: “The use of drones for tree planting in an emerging market is very innovative. The potential for scalability and precision planting are very exciting. Scalability is often the biggest challenge for implementation after a successful pilot. The closest comparison I can think of is the use of drones and sensors in US agriculture. There's been mixed results as farmers who have adopted the technology have struggled with understanding how to draw insights from the data and apply them. I don't think this will be a problem in this case as the survey data gathered will be very specific to selecting the tree variety and seed placement.”

When thinking about desirability, feasibility and viability here’s what experts shared:
• One expert shared: “The output of this project is desirable for the environmental and local economic reasons listed in the write-up. The idea of using drones for land surveying and tree planning is plausible, however it sounds like the drone technology has not been piloted yet. Without a pilot, you can't tell if the technology will work in practice, and if the assumptions are correct or not. Some things to consider are: Will the drones be able to capture the required data? Will the seed pods germinate properly? How much maintenance will the drones require? It isn't clear who the customer for these services is or what the revenue model is. Also, is BCE committed to staying involved?
• “I'd like to see this idea piloted, and if the pilot is successful, for implementation to be scaled up. The potential environmental benefits, local economy revitalization and scalability make this an attractive project. I would like to see the business model. How will you fund this work in the short and longer term?”

Human-centered design starts with the people you’re designing for and ends with new solutions that are tailor-made to suit their real needs. How does this idea consider user needs?
• Yes, it would be helpful to understand additional learnings from beneficiary feedback. What are the specifics needs you’ve discovered from the people you are building for and how have you integrated this into your design?

Outstanding comments and questions (don’t feel like you need to answer all of these questions but we wanted to share what experts were excited to learn more about):
• How will blockchain be incorporated, and is it necessary? The value of adding blockchain is unclear, and might add unnecessary complexity. I understand who the beneficiaries are, but who is the customer? Foundations? Local government? Is the project intended to be localized, and if so, how, or is BCE prepared to be involved for the long-run? With any tech solution, there needs to be support for equipment, especially in the physically challenging environment of most emerging markets. It also sounds like the data analysis and drone programming will require specialized skills from BCE. 2m planting distance is close to the ground - how will you ensure that locals don't interfere with the drone?

Thank you so much for sharing the important work you are doing!

In case you missed it, check out this Storytelling Toolkit for inspiration for crafting strong and compelling stories: http://ideo.to/DXld5g Storytelling is an incredibly useful tool to articulate an idea and make it come to life for those reading it. Don’t forget - June 16 at 11:59PM PST is your last day to make changes to your idea on the OpenIDEO platform.

Have questions? Email us at bridgebuilder@ideo.com.

Looking forward to reading more!

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for sharing with us the feedback and questions from the BridgeBuilder team and the external set of experts. We really appreciate this effort and we have consulted about our response to this valuable feedback with our 3 teams. We think it better for us to share our response to all the questions raised here in the comments section for everyone to read and understand.

The Objective of this collaboration, is the design and development of a business model to enhance the rate, scale and economic viability of mangrove reforestation in affected areas of Myanmar; thereby improving and protecting the Natural, Human and Social Capital value of the country. It is acknowledged that successful reforestation requires: Improved rate and efficiency of mapping, planting and monitoring using drone technology (BCE); on the ground land management, administration, education, community engagement and monitoring (WIF); and the development of an ecosystem economic valuation standard which subsequently supports an ecosystem service market place that incentivizes long term economic viability (Route2).

We first want to address the question about the importance of incorporating blockchain and the value of adding the technology into our project idea in order to maintain long term sustainability as we continue to scale up our ground operations in Myanmar.

Blockchain is a transparent and relatively simple technical solution to a complex problem of how to create sustained investment for projects that restore ecosystems. Sustained we define here as long lasting and resilient to shocks.

Our method of creating sustained investment is to mint digital coins from each hectare of ecosystem that is undergoing a project. These coins will be the store of value and medium of exchange that fuels the Ecosystem Service Market. Since there are a finite number of hectares there will be a finite number of coins. The value of the coin reflects the calculated economic value that the restoration of the ecosystem provides to the local and global communities.

The prevailing data storage technology that has transformed digital currencies and facilitated the rise in Bitcoin and others is blockchain, without this technology we would be relying on centralized, traditional and expensive methods of data storage. Blockchain technology has further advantages that extend beyond its function as a data storage mechanism. Three examples are given below:

1. Immutability: As the blockchain uses a distributed ledger, it is nearly impossible to change. This has a key advantage for us in adding extra challenges for landowners i.e. foreign governments to remove the rights of the land manager to restore the ecosystem. This also aids re-insurers in their confidence and capacity.

2. Transparency and Ease of Auditing: Due to the ledger being distributed and public, the transfer of ‘coins’ and the assigned hectare is open for all to view and any to audit.

3. Very little overhead related to transaction processing: This means that our costs are reduced as the maintenance of the system is partly decentralized.

Customers, i.e. the demand side of the market will be initially driven by corporates who want to offset the damages they do to society. This notion is well evidenced by the existence of both the carbon voluntary market and the carbon compliance market, where corporates will invest in CO2 positive enterprises to offset their own emissions. Our market gives corporates the opportunity to offset more than just carbon emissions as there are a whole range of ecosystem services valued in the minting of the digital coins.

Digital coins facilities both fungibility and liquidity, and open the possibility of extra-demand. These customers can be anyone, someone who wants to ‘own’ a hectare of ecosystem services for non-financial reasons. But, the real prospect and measure of true market is the customer who buys a coin and because they perceive it to appreciate in value due to the management of the land. If the people on the ground, in this case our local partner WIF, appreciate the ecosystem services through restoration then the value of the coin increases which means that the buyer can turn a profit, this encourages other buyers to participate.

The first coins to be issued will be the hectares related to this Myanmar pilot. Then if successful, we intend to expand this to all ecosystem restoration projects that meet the standards of the ecosystem evaluation and assessment side of the project.

All 3 partner are committed to execute this project idea for the duration of 3 years and all we need is the initial funding to start our engine of sustainable green growth. On that note BCE will be responsible for conducting post-planting monitoring and evaluation of mangrove trees in the project site and generate digital maps for annual reports on ecosystem health for the 3 years of the project duration.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Now we want to answer all the questions relating to the tree planting drone technology that we will be using for our large scale restoration at Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park in the Delta Region of Myanmar.

1. The idea of using drones for land surveying and tree planning is plausible, however it sounds like the drone technology has not been piloted yet.

BioCarbon Engineering is the first company in the world market that has built drones to plant trees. Starting from 2014, the company grew from an idea to 12 full-time staff, who are highly qualified and most hold PhDs. Based in Oxford, UK the company now has a plant science department, engineering department, greenhouse and testing facilities. While BCE cannot disclose the exact species and germination rates, it is has been verified that the company is achieving consistently higher germination rates compared to traditional methods.

The company has already carried out planting across the UK, Australia and South Africa, with successful results. BCE drones, comprise technology that has been tried and tested multiple times; twice reaching the Finals of the Drones For Good competition; and in 2017 achieving 2nd place in the World Cup for drones in Dubai. While the technology hasn't yet been tested in Myanmar, the conditions for mangroves have been recreated in the growth chambers in Oxford, the compatibility has been tested, and the mapping of similar terrains that BCE has carried out gives the evidence that the technology will be compatible and successful.

2. Some things to consider are: Will the drones be able to capture the required data?

Yes, the company has been in operation and carried out multiple mapping projects. BCE machine learning and GPS engineers constantly work on improving the technological capabilities, but the past mapping projects have proven that the sensors can capture all the data required for carrying out the successful restoration project.

3. Will the seedpods germinate properly?

Yes, the company has tested over 1300 species and determined the best combinations of seedpod composition, structure and fertilizer to achieve the best germination rates. BCE will qualify all the species in Oxford, before flying into Myanmar.

4. How much maintenance will the drones require? It isn't clear who the customer for these services is or what the revenue model is.

BCE engineers who would be present on the project site in Myanmar will be able to perform all the maintenance tasks necessary. Planting with the drones is 10 times faster and at least twice cheaper than planting by hand, so the Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park is incentivized to raise money using Route2 blockchain technology as explained above to deploy BCE technology to achieve large scale restoration targets in huge degraded sites.

5. I'd like to see this idea piloted, and if the pilot is successful, for implementation to be scaled up.

BCE has run multiple trials, and the company follows a strict protocol when approaching new locations. Every scalable project starts with a trial, and only after final modifications are made, and the results are visible and predictive would the company move out to the project site for full scale deployment.

6. With any tech solution, there needs to be support for equipment, especially in the physically challenging environment of most emerging markets.

BCE drones are designed to work in challenging environments and complicated terrains, and BCE pilots are trained in providing necessary care and field repair. Besides, there is an established partnership with a Pathein University located close to the project site and there will be lab space and rooms available for the major repairs of the drones if needed.

7. It also sounds like the data analysis and drone programming will require specialized skills from BCE.

BCE has highly qualified PhD level engineers and mechatronics specialists, data and machine learning experts, as well as internationally trained and licenced pilots.

8. 2m planting distance is close to the ground - how will you ensure that locals don't interfere with the drone?

The areas of planting are largely unpopulated, plus most planting would happen in complicated terrains or swamps, where people can’t access. WIF has a long-standing presence in the Delta Region of Myanmar and it will be responsible for integration and inclusion of the local community to make sure that they benefit from the project.

9. Also, is BCE committed to staying involved?

BCE is committed to perform the mapping of land, the planting trial, and if it successful will perform all planting activity, and conduct post-planting monitoring for the 3 years life cycle of the project. As stated above, the vision is to develop other eco system restoration projects beyond the pilot site in Myanmar.

Photo of Rosie Wilson
Team

This is a great idea. Mangrove trees must be protected and restored. Good luck with this wonderful project. I just had one question - how will you protect the trees from deforestation? If it is local people using the trees for firewood/income (which is clearly a necessity), will they be provided with alternatives to the mangrove trees or how will they directly benefit from the initiative?

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

You can see the document section on the left side of this page there is a Master's Thesis done by a research scholar from Norway that collected household surveys an interviews on community participation and awareness from the mangrove project site that Worldview International Foundation (WIF) has been implementing since 2012.

The improvement made by WIF to help the mangrove forests dependent communities is the introduction of efficient stoves. The stove replaces the traditional “three stone fireplace” in which a kettle or pan is placed on three stones over the fire. The efficient stove is made of clay and has a circular design to use at least 40% less firewood than before, and reduces harmful emissions. The new stove was widely accepted by the residents as exemplified by two farmers that said “Efficient stoves are very good! They make cooking easier and we use less firewood” and “I never thought about using less wood”. In addition to a changed mindset WIF has made sure that efficient stoves will be widely available by teaching people how to make them. Manufacturing and selling stoves both resulted in new income generating activities and reduced the need for firewood.

In addition to new income sources there was also new infrastructure improvements made by WIF. When the participants were asked about what changes they have seen since WIF started their work they responded that the deforestation had stopped, that the infrastructure was better and that they had better hopes for the future. The lady shopkeeper stated that “It is very good now”, and supplemented with “We got a new road and salary from WIF”.

A 35-year-old fisherman agreed and stated “Worldview has increased our knowledge and given employment. This will lead to development and more tourists”. To follow up his statement he was asked whether increased tourism will be good, and he answered that “Yes, it is good. Because tourists bring money, and that will create more jobs and more protection of the forest”.

Photo of Aparna Bhat
Team

Looks like a great project in a much needed situation.

Photo of Allen Kharbteng
Team

Excellent work in this fragile ecosystem. The work you have undertaken sounds really challenging.

Good of luck in your endeavours

Photo of Melanie Joe
Team

I visited the Thor Heyderdahl Climate Park earlier this year and was taken by the passion, dedication and commitment by WIF to restore the mangrove plantations in this region. I learnt about the value and importance of mangroves with regards to carbon sequestration and climate change, ocean ecology and extreme weather protection, that I had little knowledge of before. I think this project sounds brilliant - and if it can assist with planting more trees quickly, then even better. I look forward to following your progress.

Photo of Benjamin Quinto
Team

Interesting, unique and compelling idea.. following with interest and look forward to hearing about the results that can be achieved.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your feedback Ben and I hope we can help Arne really scale up this amazing project in the Delta Region of Myanmar that started 5 years ago as a research project.

Please make sure to protect the standing mangrove forest around your backyard in Florida. I hope you will come and visit us in Myanmar and help plant some mangrove trees with our local team on your next trip to Asia.

Photo of Thomas Df
Team

Great project led by a very professional team. Public opinion is not aware of the importance of mangrove for biodiversity issues. Hope the project will raise to its tragets. Good luck WIF !

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your inputs Thomas and now that you have a young and dynamic President in France who cares about climate change, I hope we can collaborate with the French Government to scale up our project in Myanmar.

In the case of Senegal, the country some 185,000 hectares of mangrove estuaries in the regions of Casamance and Sine Saloum, but they are disappearing at an alarming rate. A quarter of the total surface area- 45,000 hectares- of mangroves has already been lost since the 70s due to cycles of droughts, as well as to the deforestation of mangroves for timber, and the blockage of waterways by road construction. But I am glad that with the support of a French fund for livelihoods, large scale restoration has begun. http://www.livelihoods.eu/projects/oceanium-senegal/

Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Irina!

Great to have you onboard! We noticed your post is currently unpublished. Was this your intention? We'd love to have it be included in the challenge. You can publish it by hitting the "Publish" button at the top of your post. You can also update your post by clicking on the "Edit Contribution" on top. We're looking forward to seeing your contribution in this challenge.

Photo of Judith Cuninngham
Team

Bremley, What an exciting innovative additions to the Mangrove project.
Given your position asa Montessori Model UN Advisory Board Member, we would like to partner with you to recruit teachers and students ready to assist your field work. Our collaboration at the Prague Adolescent Summit is a good place to start this July. Judith

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you very much Judith for your valuable feedback on our project in Myanmar. It is an honour serving on the Montessori Model United Nations (MMUN) Advisory Board. https://montessori-mun.org/us/advisory-board-members/

I am looking forward to developing a stronger partnership with MMUN by recruiting your teachers and students to join us doing field work at our mangrove restoration project site in the Delta Region of Myanmar as part of the iYES Program. https://montessori-mun.org/the-iyes-program/

Photo of Niyati Dahisaria
Team

Congratulations for this amazing initiative. It will be interesting to see how the different areas intertwine and work in sync with each other, bringing positive changes to people's lives. Amazing mentor, inspiring leadership and the necessary motivation to make things happen and create change. Goodluck!

Photo of Rajesh Parmar
Team

Wow Bremley! This is incredible and I hope in the future we can do some great things in Africa. Good luck and you are doing an amazing thing. Cheers

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your feedback Rajesh and I am looking forward to using your Cloud Africa technology for payment of ecosystem services in the future to replicate our large scale mangrove restoration model in Africa.

The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) released a set of reports highlighting the extraordinary value of mangroves, including as carbon stores. The reports also note that mangroves, which are disappearing faster than terrestrial forests, are not yet fully benefiting from carbon financing.

In particular, the guiding principles state that the conservation of existing coastal carbon pools is the easiest approach although coastal wetland restoration technologies are available. The principles also identify criteria for successful carbon projects in coastal wetlands including community engagement, the application of landscapes approaches, and consideration of climate change projections, including anticipated sea level rise.

The second report, ‘Carbon Pools and Multiple Benefits of Mangroves in Central Africa – Assessment for REDD+’ estimates that the carbon benefits from mangroves in Central Africa could be as high as US$66 billion not including benefits from fisheries, coastal protection and other ecosystem services.

Source: http://sdg.iisd.org/news/unep-report-series-link-mangroves-carbon-and-finance/

Photo of Alex Groome
Team

Amazing initiative!! Great job Bremley and team.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you very much Alex for sending your kind words of inspiration to our team from Mexico.

We are very pleased to know that our pilot mangrove restoration project at Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park in the Delta Region of Myanmar has been selected by the Regeneration International (RI) Steering Committee as one of the five finalists of RI's Regeneration micro-grants competition.

It is great to be of The Regeneration Hub (RHub) http://www.regenerationhub.co/en/ which you have created after the UN COP22 in Marrakesh for us and I encourage all projects on this platform working on restoring fragile ecosystems around the world to also engage on the RHub and join the global RI movement towards regenerative food, farming and land use. http://regenerationinternational.org/

Photo of Joanne Schanté
Team

I fully trust Bremley and his team mates to reach their targets for this promising project. I have worked regularly with Bremley for the past year and am always impressed by the energy he brings to his projects in general, and to mangrove restoration more specifically. Go go go! :-)

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Joanne for your feedback on this project which I really value. I am glad to have been part of your 6-day ScaleCamp collaborative workshop which gathered selected participants who have already developed a social, environmental and/or economic impactful solution on a small scale, to work hand in hand with other international entrepreneurs, experts, and financiers in order to transform and develop their projects into scalable and investor ready action plans. That experience of working on my pitch and presenting our project to a coalition of international funders during official events at the Marrakesh COP22 was amazing.

I am glad that OpenTeam exist as a global platform that catalyzes concrete collaboration on a world scale, engaging change makers with all levels of expertise and project to mutualize their efforts and experiences in order to develop glocal projects (global initiatives implemented by local stakeholders). I hope we can have more ScaleCamp events with an aim to continuously fuel global collaboration using OpenTeam’s open source platform and ultimately shift the climate change paradigm through borderless collaboration.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Joanne for your feedback on this project which I really value. I am glad to have been part of your 6-day ScaleCamp collaborative workshop which gathered selected participants who have already developed a social, environmental and/or economic impactful solution on a small scale, to work hand in hand with other international entrepreneurs, experts, and financiers in order to transform and develop their projects into scalable and investor ready action plans. That experience of working on my pitch and presenting our project to a coalition of international funders during official events at the UN COP22 in Marrakesh was amazing.

I am glad that OpenTeam exist as a global platform that catalyzes concrete collaboration on a world scale, engaging change makers with all levels of expertise and project to mutualize their efforts and experiences in order to develop glocal projects (global initiatives implemented by local stakeholders). I hope we can have more ScaleCamp events with an aim to continuously fuel global collaboration using OpenTeam’s open source platform and ultimately shift the climate change paradigm through borderless collaboration.

Photo of Kimberly
Team

Innovative and exciting project by a talented group of organisations. I have known Bremley for many years and he is extremely dedicated to his work and passionate about the environment. It is wonderful to see new ideas coming together to revolutionise tree planting, and create effective sustainable solutions for the future.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Kimberly for your kinds words of inspiration on our project which I really appreciate, especially coming from someone who loves sharks and marine ecosystems. Unfortunately, our planet has already lost half of it mangrove forests, in the last 50 years, mostly due to fish and shrimp farming, tourism, agriculture, tourism and construction of houses, roads and marinas. The current rate of mangrove loss is approximately 1% per annum (according to the Food and Agriculture Organization – FAO), or roughly 150,000 hectares (370,050 acres) of mangrove wetlands lost each year.

Mangroves also play an essential role in the reproduction of several shark species, like the lemon shark. If we want to protect shark populations, we have to protect shark nurseries, refuges and habitats as well. And a more unexpected relation is the one between whale sharks and mangroves. Mangroves provide essential nourishment for plankton bloom, that attracts whale sharks. If we lose our mangrove forests, we could lose species: not only sharks, but also other species of fish and invertebrates, that are part of our blue planet’s ecosystem.

Source: http://www.dutchsharksociety.org/about-sharks-and-mangroves/

Photo of Wayne Lampert
Team

The proposal as written reads quite thoroughly and well thought out. All that I can think of to add is the very long term benefits to human life on the globe. Living in a coastal area far from the area where the actual project is planned to take place I have already seen first hand the effects of global warming. A project such as this can only help to stave off the continued erosion of the land we live on which without such projects around the world is inevitable given the current prognosis. I can only wish you the greatest of success in fulfilling the goals of the project.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your valuable feedback Wayne especially as it comes from some who lives by the coastal area of Florida. Back in 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated the US Gulf coast states. It caused around US$110 billion in damages, more than 1,800 deaths, and displaced 1.2 million people.

The disaster led to a rethink of the management of the Gulf coastline. In the seven decades preceding 2005, Louisiana had lost coastal lands, mainly marshes, totalling around 4,900 square kilometres — an area the size of Trinidad and Tobago. Following the hurricane, the President's Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force recommended extensive wetland re-establishment, noting that they “provide a natural flood attenuation function”

After the hurricane season in 2005, the Louisiana state legislature created the Coastal Protection Restoration Authority (CPRA) and tasked it with coordinating the local, state and federal efforts. The CPRA embarked on five-year coastal master plans to guide policymakers in developing a more sustainable coast.

Source: http://www.nature.com/news/policy-hurricane-katrina-s-lessons-for-the-world-1.18188

Photo of Oliver Gardiner
Team

This is great, Mangroves sequester 5 times more carbon, methane and nitrous oxides (in peatland soils) than rainforest trees.. they also provide coastal shielding against tsunamis and are therefore a tangible climate adaptation solution for countries which are facing sea level rise. You should definitely sign up to the Global Soil Partnership of the FAO, they are working to bring in policies on Soil Organic Carbon to mitigate climate change - your economic model could be highly interesting for them and their partners. GAME ON

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Oliver for your recommendations to our team and indeed we will join the Global Soil Partnership of the FAO and contribute towards policies on soil organic carbon to mitigate climate change with a focus on blue carbon farming to address food security with sea level rise in the future.

We understand that soil is an essential resource and a vital part of the natural environment from which most of the global food is produced. At the same time, soil provides living space for humans, as well as essential ecosystem services which are important for water regulation and supply, climate regulation, biodiversity conservation, carbon sequestration and cultural services. But soils are under pressure from increases in population, higher demands for food and competing land uses. Approximately 33% of our global soils are degraded and policy makers around the world are exploring opportunities to embrace sustainable development via the sustainable development goals.

However, mangrove soils have a major role to play in climate change mitigation and adaptation as they indeed drawn down 5 times more C02, N2O and CH4 Green House Gasses from our atmosphere. This is the reason why capacity of mangroves, sea grasses, and salt marshes to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is becoming increasingly recognized at an international level. Of all the biological carbon, also termed as ’green carbon’, captured in the world, over half (55%) is captured by mangroves, sea grasses, salt marshes, and other marine living organisms, which are also known more specifically as ’blue carbon’.

Source: https://www.recoftc.org/project/grassroots-capacity-building-redd/news-and-features/mangroves-more-carbon-rich-and-important-climate-change

Photo of Lorena Álvarez
Team

Congratulations for this incredible idea. I can see three very important basics on this project: agricultural technology, environmental protection and poverty reduction that will make a high impact in many people´s lives. I also rely on the team, because I had the opportunity to interchange many ideas with people working on it; I can almost ensure a bright future to this magnificient proposal, because of talent, the human capital involved on the project and the motivation to make things happen. Go for it!

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Lorena for sharing your views with our team and for your kind words of inspiration. I just want to add that back in September 2015, 193 countries adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – a roadmap to alleviate global poverty, advance social and economic development and importantly, further the integrated management of natural systems.

The importance of restoring and protecting mangroves is reflected most clearly in Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14, which focuses on sustainably governing our oceans and coasts and recognises mangroves’ immense value to local communities. But restoring mangrove forests also supports the achievement of many other SDGs, including eliminating poverty and hunger (SDG 1 and SDG 2), ensuring livelihoods and economic growth (SDG 8), taking actions against climate change impacts (SDG 13) and halting biodiversity loss (SDG 15).

Source: https://www.iucn.org/news/forests/201703/can-restoring-mangroves-help-achieve-sustainable-development-goals

Photo of Jonny Plein
Team

This is an important project and one I am willing to support!

Photo of Alan Laubsch
Team

Bravo, mangrove restoration is vital, and the application of drone technology for planting could be a game changer. Eventually AI driven analytics could be used to monitor mangroves and prioritize the most inportant actions.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your valuable inputs Alan and I am looking forward to personally introducing you to the BCE Team in Oxford and the R2S Team in London when you get to the UK next month.

Indeed our partner BCE is developing AI driven analytics for monitoring the health of the ecosystems the will help restore around the world. Here are the reasons why we are using drones.

1. To overcome challenging environments:
* Direct road access not required to manage sites.
* Work can continue in harsh conditions.
* Risk reduction through remote devices.
* Plant and monitor places that are logistically challenging.

2. To achieve fast precision planting:
* High accuracy planting mechanism allows for regulatory or optimum spacing of trees.
* High resolution aerial mapping provides highly accurate crown analysis and health analysis via machine learning.
* Low-cost long-term monitoring ensures ongoing accurate intelligence from the project.

3. To have manageable large-scale projects:
* Multiple drones per site multiplies their efficiency and increases time/cost savings.
* Fully automated mapping and planting reduces logistics chain.
* Quick deployment and cheap replacement ensures maximum work rate.

4. To achieve entire ecosystem restoration:
* High accuracy of planting mechanism allows planned planting locations.
* Wide catalogue of plant grasses, shrubs, and trees.
* Planting mechanism compatible with multiple species types and optimised for actual site soil conditions for all geographies.
* High resolution mapping provides data for on-going analysis and monitoring of ecosystem health.
* Machine learning and enhances understanding of ecosystem restorations.

In the case of Myanmar our BCE drone technology can help regrow the forest of the tide building our green shield by planting 35,000 trees per day with one drone, hence rapidly boosting the natural flood and storm defences saving millions of vulnerable lives while protecting coastal infrastructure and improving livelihoods from increase for fish stock.

Photo of Tyler Andrews
Team

I am really excited about this project! What you guys are working on here is the trifecta of ecosystem restoration, agricultural technology and impact economics. This is really ground breaking work as you are all taking initiative to pioneer a new way for global impact were bio diversity and technology synergize! The possibilities for reforestation, economic services, fishery supply and agriculture development all while reducing carbon emissions are endless. Great work and looking fwd to the days ahead. #rippleaway

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you very much Tyler for your valuable inputs and we look forward to building a strong global partnership with the Ripple Team in the U.S. once you are ready to engage. We are proposing an innovative and resilient solution to enhance and secure the restoration of mangrove ecosystems that protect the lives of highly vulnerable communities. We have developed a strategic partnership. We use the drones of BioCarbon Engineering (BEC) to accelerate the restoration through rapid and cost effective planting. We ensure the management of this restoration through the dedication of local communities and Worldview International Foundation (WIF). Finally, we secure the resilience of the project through the creation of a blockchain structured Ecosystem Services Marketplace powered by Route2 Sustainability (R2S). Once established this marketplace has the potential to provide systemic and incentivised allocation of financial capital towards all restorative and regenerative activities.

WIF has been working for 5 years in the Delta Region of Myanmar and has planted 2.7 million mangrove trees. This restoration project has directly involved local communities and empowered them through the provision of education, and environmental awareness. This includes the establishment of community energy forests, introduction of fuel saving stoves, community solar energy units all purposed to improving living conditions.

BCE has been working for 3 years, and has completed pilot test mapping and planting trials in vast areas of land across South Africa, Dubai, Australia and the UK. BCE technology enables drones to autonomously plant trees in challenging environments on an unprecedented cost and time effective scale – reaching industrial efficiencies.

Route2’s foundations are economics and ecosystems. The Founder, Dr. Daniel Lopez Dias completed his PhD under the auspices of Dr. Robert Costanza at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, which involved advising President Obama’s Climate Action Plan. Route2 is a data and analytics business providing advisory environmental economic services to an established range of clients including: The Crown Estate, PwC, SGS, and Yorkshire Water. Route2 recently provided the full spatial and economic valuation of the United Kingdom’s coastal ecosystems.

In sum, we already have an established presence in the region where the project will be implemented. We have the technology at our fingertips to rapidly increase the rate of planting. We also have the necessary natural science and economics partners who can create a resilient functioning market incentivising the expansion of this project to all ecosystem restorations. All we require is the necessary investment to deploy and expand our collective impact in the developing countries that need our help in their fight against global climate change.

Photo of barun barpujari
Team

Bremley,
Happy to note that you are involved in such a fascinating project, success of which could have huge implications in the effort towards mitigation of adverse impacts of climate change on vulnerable sections of society. It could form the blueprint for replication of similar efforts across the world. All the very best.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Barun for your valuable feedback and kind words of inspiration which will keep our small alliance of three strategic partners focused on the big mission we have. We are starting from Myanmar a least developed country that needs urgent intervention to prevent a total ecosystem collapse in the Delta Region. Once we have successfully deployed our new technologies in Myanmar, it will form the blueprint for global replication in large scale ecosystem regeneration projects around the world.

Hence Route2 will be performing a baseline Ecosystem Service Assessment & Evaluation [ES-A&E] of the designated ecosystem. This baseline ESAE provides a spatially explicit understanding of ecosystem condition and the annual economic benefit of the ecosystem specific identified ecosystem services. This annual benefit is that translated into a 50 year benefit (following the Natural Capital Protocol).

I am glad that the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) is a member of the Natural Capital Coalition which is a unique global multi-stakeholder collaboration that brings together leading global initiatives and organizations to harmonize approaches to natural capital. http://naturalcapitalcoalition.org/who/coalition-organizations/page/2/?mfilter=all

Last week The Crown Estate which is also a member of the Natural Capital Coalition won the Better Society Award for Transparent Reporting and our partner Route2 developed the methodology for their groundbreaking Total Contribution Report. https://www.thecrownestate.co.uk/media/1023085/crown-estate-aw-1412-mb.pdf

Route2 has been integral to The Crown Estate’s Total Contribution initiative since inception. Total Contribution quantifies and communicates The Crown Estate’s contribution to the UK economy and wider society. The core methodologies are now evolving into decision-making tools, for example, an aid to investment management. Further, Route2 has supported The Crown Estate in quantifying the economic benefits of ecosystem services produced across their rural and coastal portfolio.

Perhaps we can engage the members of the CII especially those with operations in Myanmar to journey with us in measuring their impact on the ecosystems the work in and the value 2 society they bring inline with achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Photo of Harjoth Singh
Team

What I particularly like about this project is how integrated the approach is between the technologies + ecology + economy, and how transparent the outcomes are likely to be. I could easily see this serving as a case study to be reapplied for the benefit of other coastal communities. The team seems very strong, and terrific to see Bremley collaborating on this with the energy and leadership he brings.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Harjoth for your valuable inputs which I really value given your solid background coming from the Classical Investment Banking world and moving into the Impact Investing and Social Entrepreneurship world. Indeed we are adopting an integrated approach between the new technologies we deploy + the deep ecology we value + the regenerative economy we create that will bring about global transparent reporting on the health of our ecosystems for long term sustainability on our planet.

We are starting from Myanmar but India is next as it possesses around 18 per cent of the world’s population, but only 2.4 per cent of land and 4.2 per cent of water resources. To achieve a high GDP growth rate, rapid development that pertains to industry and infrastructure is required. But our developmental activities are greatly affecting biodiversity. Natural resources such as water, forests, fisheries and marine resources are being overexploited, which in turn affects their renewability. A recent study shows that India will become water scarce by 2025. Emissions from industry and the transport sectors are at a high level. There is also indiscriminate discharge of solid wastes, industrial effluents and domestic sewage with considerable impact. Therefore, proactive efforts in ecosystem management that involve government and community are needed.

Economic sectors such as agriculture, fisheries, forestry, health, nutrition, water supply, energy, trade, industry, transport and tourism depend on biodiversity and impact biodiversity. Biodiversity conservation has traditionally been the responsibility of the environment sector, and undertaken through measures such as the enforcement of legal decisions, ‘polluters pay principles’ as well as the incorporation of protected areas. As the developmental sector generally ignores its responsibility towards biodiversity conservation, a more responsible approach towards biodiversity management, by mainstreaming, is needed.

The active involvement of Central/State Ministries and Departments is needed for Accounting of Natural Capital into the GDP of the country.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/Accounting-for-natural-capital/article16779362.ece

Photo of Nenem Misao
Team

Hi Bremley. This is a wonderful combination of vision and collaboration with cutting edge technology. Very exciting times ahead when the results of this innovative approach will start showing in the restoration of mangroves in Myanmar which have such important connections to its societal and economic development and climate change issues. Thumbs up on the 3 Ps approach too! As somebody involved in peace building issues, it is satisfying to see such a comprehensive, hopeful approach to the challenges on our planet.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Nenem for your important feedback which I really appreciate, especially with your field experience and involvement in peace building issues. I truly believe that we can only achieve long term sustainable development if we have sustainable peace in the conflict zones and post-conflict zones around the world.

Environmental degradation increasingly gives rise to conflicts or catalyses existing struggles, as numerous studies show. But in attempting to solve these problems, peacebuilders have begun to appreciate that environmental factors can also form part of the solution.

In order to understand how the environment can facilitate peacebuilding, it's important to explain the causes of environmental conflicts. They are induced by ecological factors such as the scarcity of natural resources, movement of hazardous materials and loss of livelihoods – possibly leading to demographic pressure, forced migration and degradation resulting from climate change.

In many war-torn areas, transfrontier conservation areas or peace parks have been established to act as buffer zones and provide scope to reduce tension and promote dialogue between countries. The Cordillera Condor between Peru and Ecuador is a shining example of achieving peace through conservation. Similar efforts can be seen in the North and South Korean demilitarised zone, and the establishment of a peace park has also been proposed between India and Pakistan.

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2014/may/15/environmental-conflict-natural-resources-peacebuilding

Photo of Aybike Yurtsever
Team

Again, you have a really great project Bremley. With a new technology ı am sure you can save our planet. Good luck my firend.

Photo of Ibadaphunshisha Blah
Team

Truly an amazing and inspiring project Brem,... it's the need of the hour. Sincerely hope you reach your targets with this new technology and I wish you and your team all the very best. Go save planet Earth!!

Photo of Alcino Pascoal
Team

I got to know Bremley about one and a half years ago, whenever we did meet at an international event under the framework of an EU-funded project. I was mesmerised by then with the first contact and his plans related to the identification of concrete actions aiming at to preserve the rainforest in Southeast Asia. Some months later another incredible and sustainable initiative powered up by "BCE" has surfaced, therefore shedding some light over a sensible environmental problem which we can neglect at all. I am fully supportive of such a project, which can definitely help to improve the living conditions of a fragile fishing community placed at Myanmar and, at the same time, has a huge environmental contribution by means of reducing the impact of climate change as well sequestering a large quantity of CO2. Wish you all the success with such an ambitious and relevant project. Regards, AP

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Alcino for your important feedback on this particular mangrove restoration project in the Delta Region of Myanmar. I am very glad that our paths crossed in Turkey under the framework of an EU-funded project and I hope that we can continue our strategic partnership beyond it and engage Social Entrepreneurs across Europe to address climate change inline with implementing the UN Sustainable Development Goals in their countries http://360entrepreneurship.net/

We called the Myanmar project Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park – in honor of the well-known Norwegian author, scientist, environmentalist and explorer Thor Heyerdahl – to promote awareness and commitment for urgent action on climate change. He was among the first in the world to raise awareness on climate change and campaigned strongly for reduction of greenhouse gases. Heyerdahl was a founding member of WIF and served as its Vice President for many years.

His son Bjørn Heyerdahl shares his father’s commitment and is engaged in WIF’s mangrove research project in Myanmar in cooperation with leading universities. WIF is honored to partner with Dr. Sylvia Earle and Mission Blue in this inspiring challenge for a better future. We invite others to join us in restoring mangrove ecosystems to reduce the impact of climate change and protecting human life under the banner of Mission Blue https://www.mission-blue.org/2015/05/regrowing-forests-of-the-tide/

Photo of B Genus
Team

I completely felt compelled to write on this LCD project, which challenges to tackle both a deforestation, as-well-as sadly it’s many related climate change issues. And although I haven’t known Bremley for very long I nevertheless fully endorse his candour, although I write with somewhat acute knowledge on the subject matter now (Climate Change) as I’ve not been involved in the space for some several years now. I honestly can say that I don’t think that I’ve ever come across someone with so much dedication, who has such a passion, energy and tenacity to carry-out their dream.
I really do hope the world would embrace such efforts, perhaps it would help to make it a better place for us all.
Good Luck Bremley.

Brett Genus

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much for your kind words of inspiration Brett and I really value your frank feedback as you have been involved in the carbon credit trading world from the early days executing the biggest transactions on our planet from London. As part of this small alliance the three strategic partners propose to scale up the mangrove restoration project with the aid of BCE, that invented the technology of using drones for good - to restore damaged and degraded ecosystems.

Our collective idea is to deploy new technology in fighting climate change by using tree-planting drones to rapidly regrow the forests of the tide at the mangrove restoration project site in the Delta Region of Myanmar. The WIF team started the pilot project with two local universities to restore 750 ha of mangrove forest back in 2012 and it has planted 2.7 million trees so far.

The target for 2017 is to scale the project up by planting 1 million new mangrove trees in another 250 ha of degraded land and keep expanding annually until we complete the restoration of 250,000 ha of degraded coastal land in Myanmar.

The successful expansion requires further financial incentive(s). To this end, and Route2’s role, is the design, development and implementation of a new ecosystem service assessment and evaluation standard and tradeable token or Ecosystem Service Coin (ESC), using blockchain distributed ledger technology.

This standard will ascertain the annual economic value of ecosystem services delivered by the ecosystem. The value of these services will translated into digital currency for corporates, institutional investors and consumers to buy and sell. The former (corporates) can buy and hold these ESCs to offset the ecological damage of their economic activities (including greenhouse gas emissions).

Through the effective and compensated land management of these ecosystems, ESCs will appreciate in value. ESCs will offer competitive return on investment [ROI] and this ROI will provide the missing incentive that will enable the successful expansion of the outlined project.

Photo of Nuray Tanış
Team

Another great project from Bremley! I am a big fan of new technology use in environmental protection. Drone use from this perspective is amazing and I am sure it will be a huge success with your network and supporters from everywhere in the world. Good job and good lucks!

Photo of Ravinol Chambers
Team

This is a really exciting project, with so many winning elements. It's a win / win / win for all involved. I love how new technology is being used to tackle the problem and to ensure a more efficient and effective solution. Great to see. Well done!

Photo of Amadou Bah
Team

Just returning from Nepal with www.viaglobal.org
I Beleive this is an incredible project that can turnout to be the solution for our planet. The combination of helping veterans with PTSD to heal themselves and restoring ecosystems for poorer communities across the globe; will be the perfect humanitarian mission and it will be an honour to be part of that.

Photo of Irina Fedorenko
Team

Thank you so much, Amadou. You work looks very interesting and relevant to what we do at BioCarbon. We are involved with this conference - http://www.caux.ch/Caux-Dialogue-on-Land-and-Security-CDLS you may find it relevant to attend.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Amadou for updating me on the success of your Mission to Nepal and I look forward to hosting your team at our project site in Myanmar on your new trip to Asia. Please consider participating at the Land & Security Dialogue that our partner Irina and her team from BioCarbon are hosting this summer in Caux, Switzerland.

I believe that our goals are aligned as VIAGLOBAL aims to provide military and emergency service veterans suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) with an opportunity to rebuild their lives and participate in society to a degree they can manage by utilising their skills and professionalism in areas of the world afflicted by natural disasters or crises where their skills will help rebuild the lives of those less fortunate.

By working with our local communities on the ground in restoring degraded mangrove ecosystems in the Delta Region of Myanmar they will help regrow the green shield for disaster mitigation from future floods and storms. In doing so the veterans will improve their self-esteem, worthiness and confidence proving to themselves that they are productive and essential in healing the world.

Photo of Amadou Bah
Team

Many thanks for your kind words and invitation Irena. This is clearly an issue that's interesting to all. I'm very much looking forward to working together where possible.

Photo of Ed Salter
Team

This is the most logical, the most economical and the fastest route to having an impact against deforestation related climate change that I have come across
it is the best bang for your buck
We are presently preparing a plan to offset the emissions for our entire fleet of heritage vehicles by working in collaboration with Brem and the team that will lead to the proposition to the UK tour operations and then onto U.K. Transport in general for a carbon neutral industry

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Ed for your commitment to make a difference on our planet for future generations. I really value your leadership and your passion to start small with your own bus tour company and then scaling up your model to engage the entire UK bus tour operations and then the whole UK transport industry. Since we last spoke our three strategic partners are now moving beyond the Carbon Neutral industry to creating a full scale Natural Capital Neutral global industry.

Here is why we are going beyond carbon neutral and putting a total economic valuation on restoring damaged ecosystems while maintaining healthy ecosystems around our planet. With regards to the value to society that marine ecosystems have globally, tidal marsh and mangrove ecosystem services (ES) are valued at approximately US$32 billion annually, which translates to approximately US$194,000 per ha per year. A regional valuation from the Pacific Islands suggests the composite value of mangroves across multiple ecosystem services ranges between US$4300 -$8500 per ha per year, which represent significant market values when considered alongside mean annual household incomes per-adult-equivalent in the region (e.g., for Fiji, US$2664 in 2008;). In addition, other non-market benefits (e.g., cultural and aesthetic values) provided by mangroves cannot easily be monetised, but should be considered for decision making related to mangrove management.
Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4805192/

The Total Economic Value (TEV) of mangroves in the study area (Takalar district, South Sulawesi) was in the range of US$4370 per ha (the highest value contribution derived from the indirect use value (94%), whereas commercial aquaculture had a net benefit value of US $3000 per ha. In addition, the comparison of Net Present Value (NPV) between the benefit value of mangroves and that of commercial aquaculture revealed that conversion of mangroves into commercial aquaculture was not economically beneficial when the analysis was expanded to cover the costs of environmental and forest rehabilitation.
Source: ISSN 1999-4907 www.mdpi.com/journal/forests

Photo of Paul Hyman
Team

I hope this project succeeds. There are so many reasons for planting mangroves and the benefits are global and local. Increasing efficiency of planting is the best way to ensure that resources are put to best use. It will also help us in our quest to attract more donations when we introduce people to the Climate Park by stand up paddleboard later this year

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you so much Paul for your valuable feedback especially after your field visit to Thor Heyerdhal Climate Park in February 2017 where you were able to meet and work with our WIF team at the project site.

I am confident that our Stand Up Paddle campaign that we have developed in partnership with WaterTrek Foundation, 360 Active and Starboard will continue to grow in Myanmar and promote the following objectives:

To promote Stand Up Paddle as a sport that can link communities living in mountain ecosystems to communities living in coastal ecosystems and raise the profile of the negative impact on waterways and coastlines from man made pollution like plastic, mining and chemical contamination.

To inspired young people living in our target communities that they can become world class athletes if they have the proper support and training environment and to cultivate a new generation of water sports athletes who will take care of their fragile ecosystems and playgrounds by keeping their waterways and coastlines clean from pollution and contamination.

To engage with the communities in the coastlines of Myanmar and plant mangrove trees on the coast to prevent impact of future storms, tsunamis, cyclones, flooding by protecting the vulnerable coastal communities and to speak to school and university students in the areas close the project site of Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park.

To inspire the development of eco water sports tourism like Stand Up Paddling as way to create green jobs and sustainable livelihoods for both the mountain and coastal communities in Myanmar.

Your support and involvement will help cultivate a new generation of local water sports athletes who will take care of their fragile ecosystems and playgrounds by keeping their waterways and coastlines clean from pollution and contamination.

Photo of Mahesh S
Team

Hi Bremley congrats on this remarkable initiative and particularly in applying BCE technology to scale up mangrove plantations in Myanmar. I think it' will be a great example of not only using new ICT technologies and drones for the environment but also enabling high impact as well as monitoring and making information about it accessible to scientists, experts and ordinary folk who want to make a difference to our planet. Eventually perhaps you could even think about an app or website where all this info would be readily accessible and the difference in mangrove cover and sand positive changes can be easily tracked over the years. This could then also be correlated to other positive impacts such as reduction in erosion, reduced damage from future cyclones etc. will be keenly watching this exciting initiative bear fruit! Keep up the great work! Best regards, Mahesh Sugathan

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you very much for your important feedback Mahesh which I really value as we moved forward with expanding this life changing project in the Delta Region of Myanmar. As a collaboration of three strategic partners with different backgrounds we have made a breakdown of our responsibilities in order to have the maximum impact in our target area for total ecosystem restoration.

WIF is responsible for building local partnerships in Myanmar with leading coastal universities, the Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry (MOECAF) and coastal communities. Since 2012 WIF has opened large potentials in promoting adaptation to climate change. WIF has undertaken a new restoration project on 2500 ha on the request of the MOECAF, including another request by Myeik University to support developing a new mangrove park of 1600 ha. There is also an ongoing process for developing a REDD+ initiative on 25,000 ha in protecting standing mangrove forests and another 7500 ha for restoration.

BCE is responsible for the deployment of the tree planting drone technology at the project site in the Delta Region of Myanmar and training of local teams to support its scientific team, engineers and drone pilots. It will work with local communities, students and faculty from the marine science department of Pathein University for mangrove seed collection and production of the seed pods. BCE will also be responsible for post-planting monitoring and evaluation of mangrove trees in project site and producing digital maps to show tree growth over the life of the project.

Route2 is responsible for creating a new Ecosystem Services Standard (ESS) in order to measure and monitor the Total Economic Value that will be provided by the restored ecosystems annually to the beneficiaries and the whole country. Route2 will conduct annual audits to check on the health of the restored mangrove ecosystems in the entire project site and produce precise valuations reports on the generation on ESS Units for corporate clients.

We will indeed be building a special app and website where all this real time information from our project sites would be readily accessible where experts can see the difference in mangrove cover and the positive changes can be easily tracked over the years. This real time data we collect from our field operations will be correlated to other positive impacts such as reduction in erosion from flooding and reduced damage from future cyclones in the Delta Region of Myanmar.

Photo of Mike KM
Team

This is a vital project coming at a time where peace, climate change and sustainable development have never been more inrinsically linked together. The genius of the partnership is in harnessing the latest in modern technology to improve the lives of local communities and ally this with the traditional methods of farming and replanting mangroves which should have never been destroyed in the first place. This joint venture can serve as a blueprint for other such projects in the region and indeed globally. Having work on the Sustainable Development Goals this collaboration and others like it give me great hope that we can overcome the enormous challenges we face in securing peace and prosperity whilst living in harmony with the Environment.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thank you very much for your kind words of inspiration Mike and I really appreciate your feedback. The life of the project idea is designed to last for at least 30 years but we plan to have full restoration of our mangrove ecosystems in the Delta Region within 10 years time inline with achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

As part of this alliance the three strategic partners propose to scale up the mangrove restoration project with the aid of BCE, that invented the technology of using drones for good - to restore damaged and degraded ecosystems. Our collective idea is to deploy new technology in fighting climate change by using tree-planting drones to rapidly regrow the forests of the tide at the mangrove restoration project site in the Delta Region of Myanmar.

The WIF team started the pilot project with two local universities to restore 750 ha of mangrove forest back in 2012 and it has planted 2.7 million trees so far. The target for 2017 is to scale the project up by planting 1 million new mangrove trees in another 250 ha of degraded land and keep expanding annually.

The successful expansion requires further financial incentive(s). To this end, and Route2’s role, is the design, development and implementation of a new ecosystem service assessment and evaluation standard and tradeable token (i.e. Ecosystem Service Coin), using blockchain distributed ledger technology.

Photo of Claudio Marrocco
Team

It is a pleasure to read about this kind of project, indispensable for Earth's survival. Hope it gets as many support as it deserves. I'm already looking forward to seeing the progress. Good luck !

Photo of eldy wullur
Team

Hi Irina,
As it is known that Indonesia has the largest coastline in the world, but mangrove forests are damaged as a result of being used for firewood for local people and made as an additional income for families by selling firewood. Another thing is also because the coast is built shopping centers, malls and so forth.
Salute to you who actually restore it to stock fish and protect the environment from the destruction of mangrove forests.

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

Thanks for sharing your experiences on the situation of mangrove forests in Indonesia. We face the same challenges in Myanmar. In contrast to the positive statements regarding community supported mangrove forest reserves there are challenges to be aware of. Most notable is that not all people feel like the forest is theirs anymore. This attitude is reflected in interviews when asked what they think will happen after WIF leaves the area. One fisherman said that “We will probably chop it all down to sell the timber” and added that, “If I don’t have money, and don’t catch fish, I have to cut and sell mangroves to support my family”. Another fisherman stated, “I don’t believe people change. More trees lead to more logging for charcoal.” Such attitudes were only openly expressed by two out of the 29 interviewed people, but there were notably some negative opinions regarding the ban from harvesting timber for firewood and construction materials.

This issue might be mitigated if a community forest is established in the area complimentary to the mangrove forest reserve. When the villagers of Shwethaunyan about their knowledge and opinions about community forests, 15 of the participants had knowledge about it, and the village leader, a 45-year-old man, said, “We would like to establish a community forest to protect our forest and village”. Similar statements were recorded from the other participants, exemplified by the 32-year-old fisherman stating “This (a community forest) could be very positive because the whole society could benefit from the resources”. The benefits a community forest can bring were investigated through research done by a Norwegian scholar in several villages where this procedure had been operational for many years.

Photo of Lubomila Jordanova
Team

Inspiring initiative! Looking forward to seeing the further development of the project! Well done!

Photo of Janessaline Pyngrope
Team

It's a worthwhile project, much needed at this point in time....carry on the good works you all������

Photo of Giancarlo Vettori
Team

Amazing idea you are great

Photo of Samantha B Marbaniang
Team

Inspiring initiative. All the best!!

Photo of Tony
Team

Ambitious plan. Think Big. Start Small. Scale Fast.

Photo of Darivianca Elliotte Laloo
Team

Congratulations Bremley on an innovative and most benificial project in reforestation. Hope you get the support you need .

Photo of Kaan Cengiz
Team

Excellent idea with great collaboration, i hope it gets as many support as it deserves and grows fast as we all human beings and the earth needs such projects and inspration.

Photo of Jessica White
Team

Great idea. Gives insight into innovative solutions to climate change.

Photo of Juan Buceta
Team

I congratulate you on the project. It is very inspiring to see creativity and scientific knowledge being used to build a greener world.

Photo of Juan Herrada
Team

Great initiative unlocking the power of emerging technologies to solve environmental problems at scale. Looking at the partners' track record and experience, I'm confident that they'll make a life long change in Myanmar and be able to roll this out to other regions in the near future. Best of luck to them all and I offer them my full support, should they need it. Juan

Photo of Yathavan
Team

It is great to see the implementation of more complex technology in areas beyond pure commercial functions. I hope to see significant improvements in scale and efficiency of the tree planting projects. And hope that this project provides a great template to the organisations and governments that would like to preserve the quality of their country and world.

Photo of Bianca Madison-Vuleta
Team

I have known Dr Lyngdoh in a professional capacity for many years and have full confidence in his vision and capabilities. This is an amazing project.
I hope to be able to offer my help and support.
Best wishes.

Bianca Madison- Vuleta

Photo of Annie Lennon
Team

A powerful project for mangrove restoration that, once a reality, will no doubt benefit other environmental causes too. I'll be eagerly awaiting it's progress among the mangrove trees in Myanmar!

Photo of Vojta Dlouhy
Team

I've been closely working with Dr. Bremley Lyngdoh since 2012 – due to my internship in Worldview Impact Foundation in the United Kingdom followed by volunteering experience in North East India, Nepal, Myanmar and Sri Lanka. I met Dr. Arne Fjortoft, father of Worldview International Foundation and Thor Heyerdahl Climate Park, back in 2014 and was part of their extensive research work and dialogues with stakeholders, local communities living in the most damaged Delta Regions of Myanmar.

This is truly wonderful idea of how to put new technologies into action for good cause and next step of how to fulfill the WIF mission in much larger scale in the line of new trends, big date collection and use, IoT and sharing economies. Rock on!

Photo of Zek Dundar
Team

Great initiative to protect the environment and give it back what we have been taking from it. Thank you very much Bremley for the idea and your commitment.

Photo of Jack Holman
Team

This is an example of having the knowledge of what has gone wrong and the need to right it along with the tech, knowhow and will to do something about it - Make it happen Bremley! I know you will

Photo of Irina Pleva
Team

Great idea to scale up reforestation! Certainly, a project where technology meets the environmental challenge. I am intrigued to follow the progress!

Photo of Rui
Team

This is very necessary!

Photo of Alana Lea
Team

I'm very excited by the potential of this project to both restore mangroves, and use drones for planting in a way that could really make a massive positive impact. Sounds like a stellar collaboration.

Photo of Robinder Khurana
Team

THIS IS GENIUS!!!!

I'm looking forward to planting some trees and sending more teams to do so working with Worldview Impact Organisation. Lets save the world one billion trees at a time.

Inspired!!

Photo of Sunil Thapa
Team

This project is an innovative example of how advanced technology can be used to save the most vulnerable problems of the world.
The team and the strategic collaborators are no doubt the most serial social entrepreneurs who are dedicated to solve the problems of the civilization.
Wishing them all the power!

Photo of Laurent Mesbah
Team

What a great project Bremley ! Protecting Magrove ecosystems is essential. In tropical coastal areas mangrove trees are a wonder of evolution, being able to grow on sea water, does not depend on rainfall, and is reducing greenhouse gas emission. Mangroves contribute both to climate change mitigation and to adaptation.

Photo of Sudarshan Chaudhary
Team

Really wonderful! project Bremly......have great time... and wish you and your team all the best..

Photo of Sean Southey
Team

Wonderful initiative! Do support!! Keep up the good work team.

Photo of Jeremy Freedman
Team

This looks like a great initiative, mangroves are integral to coastal protection in the face of rising ocean levels and more frequent and intense storms.

Photo of Ella GZ Asselin
Team

Hello,
The project is fantastic and innovative!
I really like the fact that you are a collaboration of different organisations with different domains of expertise and that your alliance will allow the most vulnerable coastal communities in Myanmar, who have been deeply affected by climate change and conflicts, to benefit from it. The videos are clear and consistent, it helps us understand easily the concept of this great project!

Photo of Bremley Lyngdoh
Team

We are looking forward to building a strong alliance between our three strategic partners to restore degraded mangrove ecosystems rapidly using tree planting drones so we can regrow the green shield in order to protect the lives of the most vulnerable coastal communities living in the Delta Region of Myanmar and create sustainable livelihoods using our payment for ecosystem services standard that measures the total economic value to society of our project intervention.

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Irina!

Really interesting project!
I can see how it bridges planet and prosperity, and maybe peace but would you consider writing a short summary at the top of your post to emphasise this e.g.
'This idea is a_________________ [campaign/app/service/program/online platform/toolkit/social enterprise/etc.].
It tackles the problem of _____________[short problem statement].
It addresses the problem by :__________[what your idea looks like in practice]. It intersects XYZ topics (peace, prosperity, or planet).’
Would you consider including links to websites for the organisations? Do you have any video footage of the drone planting? I think it would really help visualise the project.
What is the timeline for your project?

Photo of Irina Fedorenko
Team

Thank you so much! We have made the chnages I hope this helps!