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Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest

Compassion is the bridge that connects and unifies humanity. We strengthen that bridge.

Photo of Jon Ramer

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*Please Upload User Experience Map (as attachment) and any additional Beneficiary Feedback in this field

The "User Experience Map" video above summarizes the user/player journey of discovery and participation. Here is the Improve Phase summary: http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf Note: the Compassion Games are played by anyone of any age, location, and culture and include people in all walks of life. Our 1 ideal user is based on the true story of an amazing Champion of Compassion: http://bit.ly/2pEve1s Here's the Feedback doc: http://bit.ly/2pCjFa6 Here's the User Experience Map doc: http://bit.ly/2r79qN7

Explain your project idea in two sentences.

The Compassion Games creatively engages people to address urgent local and global issues by implementing acts of compassion and community service. Players challenge one another in five annual games.

What is your organization name? Explain your organization in one sentence.

Compassion Games International builds compassion action, skill, and impact at local & global levels.

Is this project idea new for you or your organization? If no, how much have you already executed on?

The Games evolved to meet community demand since 2012 & incorporated in 2014. Since then, 16 coopetitions have been organized with 1,000+ teams, spanning 53 countries, serving 5+ million people. We now aim to ignite a viral participatory campaign, making compassion a global force for good.

What is the problem you aim to solve with this idea? How would you define this problem as urgent and a priority in your target community?

Compassion is an antidote to the fear, social isolation, division, loss of civility, & disconnection of our time. Through compassionate action we find common ground to live well together in a diverse world & to collaborate effectively to address the complex local & global challenges we face.

What is the timeline for your project idea? What are the key steps for implementation in the next 1-3 years?

Design and launch Compassionate Cities League and Global Unity Compassion Games: Building Bridges in June. Play in September. Scale annual Coopetitions. Over next 3 years - grow the League's: Compassionate Cities, Youth & Schools, Indigenous Peoples; advance the platform (integrated report maps, sign-up process, multilingual website, app development); stabilize core funding; establish customized Games for businesses and organizations; cultivate media partnerships.

Describe the individual or team that will implement this idea (if a partnership, please explain breakdown of responsibility).

We are a non-profit led by a mostly volunteer core group of innovative social network entrepreneurs and compassion enthusiasts that has grown organically from a “compassion challenge” from two US Mayors to supporting a global platform and experience accessible to all ages, cultures, and communities.

What do you need the most support with in this project idea?

  • Business Development/Partnerships

What is your primary goal over the next 6 weeks of Refinement?

  • Get feedback from experts

How do you currently measure (or plan to measure) results for this project?

We measure the number of Players and Partners & their participation on the Compassion Report Map. Players report their impact (# of volunteers, # of hours served, # of people served, & monies raised for local and global causes). We will include social progress indicators measuring the wellbeing of individuals and communities and shared prosperity. We will add measures that include social and mainstream media engagement and message reach. We will request & integrate ongoing public feedback.

How has your project proposal changed due to your user research during the Beneficiary Feedback Phase?

The feedback phase has encouraged us to consider all aspects of the Compassion Games workflow, and whatever needs to change to take this to scale. New partners were identified, including via OpenIDEO. We fine-tuned our focus for the next 3 years, balancing our attention between our platform and grassroots, community advancement. We enhanced how we communicate about our mission and our team.

(Optional) What are some of your still unanswered questions or concerns about this idea?

What don't we know, the knowing of which would enable us to spark a viral self-replicating participation? What is the appropriate financial model(s) that can move the project to scale? How do we ensure that everyone can participate?

During this Improve Phase, please use the space below to add any additional information to your proposal.

Here is the Improve Phase Summary document http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

HERE IS AN EXCERPT:
We are grateful to OpenIDEO and the GHR Foundation for visioning and putting forth the BridgeBuilder Challenge. It's a gift to work together to design and innovate for the global good. Thank you! The following summarizes the Compassion Games participation in the "Improve Phase." We highlight the changes we've made so far and our plans for the next three years. We see a great fit with OpenIDEO/GHR and share how we think we meet the criteria and offer a few possibilities for how we might grow together.

Here is the Improve Phase Summary document http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

The Power of Feedback
Participating in the OpenIDEO BridgeBuilder Challenge empowered us to solicit and integrate feedback in a way that has already improved and will continue to improve the Games for our Players and Partners as well as the Leadership Team that organizes the Games.

The Games are grassroots and community-driven. We routinely welcome and ask for beneficiary feedback via informal conference calls and face-to-face meetings with participants and other beneficiaries. In 2017, we instituted an online “chat” feature on our website to receive and respond to feedback in real-time.

In this past month as part of the OpenIDEO process, we challenged ourselves to receive feedback from sources we had not previously heard from or who had no previous experience with the Compassion Games. This opened up a variety of perspectives and comments that will inspire, transform and guide the participants as well as the Compassion Games Leadership team to expand our creativity and respond to new ideas.

During the Feedback Phases of the Challenge, we received over 100 meaningful comments. We summarized them in a document and cataloged them for review, and shared selected ones via social media to attract more feedback. For us, the feedback phases became much more than soliciting suggestions. The feedback opened our hearts and minds to appreciate what the Games have come to be and offered key insights and pathways for the Games to expand and grow. Consequently, we now see the need for having a more formal feedback loop in place as a basis for ongoing improvements and enhancements.

The input we received in the Feedback phases has affirmed that the Compassion Games engages communities all over the globe while building bridges across cultural, national and generational divides. The Games inspire individuals and groups to take on collective action and community service, making a difference in local communities, in a new and exciting way. One Expert said:

“This is a really interesting model, which has clearly already built considerable scale. Well done! Impressive both for numbers involved and their global spread. I haven’t seen anything at this scale before quite like this!”

In other comments, people wanted the Compassion Games to be of the same importance, global prominence and participation as the Olympics. We feel that this feedback supports our goal of bringing the Compassion Games to scale to serve 100 million people within the next 3 years.

To help us in expanding the Games, the beneficiary and expert feedback also identified areas in which we could improve. Based on the input, we are planning many changes to our Game Design Framework and Global Community Platform. Through an inclusive design approach, we will address accessibility and usability issues by including multiple languages, support for players with various abilities, and create ways for players that do not have internet access to be able to report. We will also enable participants to connect with each other and share their stories on the Compassion Report Map via social media.

As we make improvements, we will gather feedback, learn, and continue to restructure the Games, so they become easier and easier for people to understand, play, and share. We will embrace “design thinking” strategies and share “design thinking” resources via our website. We aim to develop the Games so that players and teams gain personal and collective benefit from participating, see the value of compassionate action in their communities, and connect with each other to amplify and synchronize the collective impact.

Here is the complete Improve Phase Summary document http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

Note that you may also edit any of your previous answers within the proposal. Here is a great place to note any big final changes or iterations you have made to your proposal below:

We have learned a lot! Here is the complete Improve Phase Summary document http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

We propose that the “bridging work” of our time may be “bridging play” to build bridges to peace, prosperity, and planet by “playing with compassion”.  

Here is the Improve Phase Summary document: http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

Welcome to the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest.  

Compassion Games International promotes and strengthens new narratives of citizen power through the lens and experience of compassion. Compassion is an antidote to the fear, division, disconnection and social isolation of our time. Scientific research abounds in revealing the intrinsic value of compassion in supporting civil society as well as individual people to flourish.

As a profound source of empowerment within each of us, doing compassionate acts as part of a community challenge inspires us to connect authentically with one another, rejuvenating our spirits as we actively live into a positive vision of our world, together. 

We see compassion as the power-source for a positive social narrative and that compassionate acts transcend boundaries that divide people and institutions. 

With your help we can take this to scale, to extend and enhance community-level change by increasing the number of participating communities; and increasing the quality of life for the players and partners and those they serve within each of their communities.

The following six impacts offer a way to appreciate and anticipate the benefits of participation in the Compassion Games:

1. Catalyst to Ignite Engagement: The Compassion Games reframe play and competition by turning “competitive altruism” and “friendly-competition” into “coopetition” amongst and between different teams to create excitement and motivate interest in participating.

2. Amplifier of What’s Already Working: The Compassion Games can strengthen and amplify what is already working in a community.  Weaving together existing events and activities from different groups and organizations catalyzes a shared collective impact. The Compassion Games also inspires new events and activities that build upon existing efforts.

3. Framework and Baseline for Measuring Compassion Strength: The Compassion Games measure community service through the number of volunteers, hours of service, monies raised for local causes, and numbers of people served.  Results create a baseline for building a team’s compassion impact and value over time, strengthening our individual and collective “compassion muscles”.

4. Engaging Environment for Reflection and Learning: The Compassion Games offer a means for engagement and reflection which transfers the experiences from the Games to the real world. Composing and sharing Compassion Reports that include these reflections helps players build the skills needed to act more effectively and compassionately with ourselves and our communities.

5. Platform for Cultivating Open Participation: The Compassion Games offer an open-source, “Do-It-Ourselves” creative platform. The Games tap into a growing capacity and desire to engage with compassion in ways that go beyond theory and passive consumption.  The Games are open, participatory, peer-driven, and a thriving example of open-source collaboration.

6. Connection to a Global Movement: The Compassion Games are a part of an international compassion movement that inspires participation in something greater than oneself. The Compassion Games help us to understand, connect, and learn from each other while co-creating a global culture of kindness.

Results to Date

Explain your idea

In five annual Compassion Games, competition becomes coopetition as teams and individuals challenge one another to strive together to make our planet a better place to live through community service, acts of kindness, and raising monies for local and global causes.

Each of the five annual Games are organized around a theme (i.e. global unity, youth and schools, social equity, interfaith cooperation and earth stewardship) or a globally synchronized event such as a Solstice or Equinox.

The Games amplify what is already working in our communities and inspires increased engagement, leading to new activities that bring compassion to life and improve our well-being.

Based upon just what's reported on the Compassion Report Map, in the past five years almost 500,000 agents of compassion have directly served over 5 million people in over 40 countries and donated over $80 million dollars to local and global causes.

Each coopetition begins with organizing teams of players. The teams identify creative ways they can engage in compassionate action. They consider all 3 dimensions of compassion: caring for others, self, and the Earth.

Compassionate actions can range from personal acts of kindness to community service projects. Examples include everything from creating and distributing “compassion currency” within a school district, implementing strategies to end homelessness for veterans, coming together to clean up hate graffiti and install a bench at a mosque, to community service such as revitalizing a downtown, creating a food drive and rehabilitating a trail. From prisons, to schools, faith and interfaith congregations, businesses, non-profit organizations, Tribes and government agencies the Games strengthen and communicate what's positively working and provides a framework to benchmark and measure a community's collective capacity to serve.

Then the coopetition gets into full gear as teams carry out their projects. Players and teams reflect upon the outcomes and impacts of their participation and post on a report map the number of volunteers, people served, volunteer hours, and monies raised.

Who Benefits?

We are building an open, participatory, peer-driven collaborative platform that communities, organizations, businesses, governments and individuals use to catalyze volunteering and service. It is being enthusiastically used to bridge peace, prosperity, and the planet.

From prisons to schools, faith and interfaith congregations, businesses, non-profit organizations, Tribes and government agencies, the Games strengthen and communicate what's positively working and inspires increased engagement, leading to new activities that bring compassion to life. Anyone can play the Games.

How is your idea unique?

We live, organize and play in the largest "compassion competitions" in the world. "Life games reflect life aims." The Games are an antidote to the Hunger Games of our times. The Games reframes competition. You cannot lose the Compassion Games. By playing and sharing together we manifest win-win co-creative solutions. The Compassion Games are infinite games. and the more people play, the more people win!

Idea Proposal Stage

  • Full-scale roll-out: I have completed a pilot and analyzed the impact of that pilot on the users I am trying to reach with my idea. I am ready to expand the pilot significantly.

Tell us more about you

The Compassion Games is made up of the Leadership Team who are the working life-force and organizers of the Games, Mentors who guide and support the development of the Games, and Luminaries who light the way with their vision for a compassionate world. Learn more below about the diverse group of people who make the Compassion Games possible here http://compassiongames.org/who-we-are/

Expertise in sector

  • 5-7 years

Organization Filing Status

  • Yes, we are a registered non-profit.
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Team (12)

Lesa R.'s profile
Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH

Role added on team:

"Dr. Walker is the Founder of Compassionate Austin and member of the Compassion Games Leadership Team."

Jon's profile
Joey's profile
Joey Crotty

Role added on team:

"Joey is a member of the Compassion Games Leadership Team."

Adil's profile
Adil Kassam

Role added on team:

"Adil is a co-founder of Unify http://peace.unify.org"

Marilyn's profile
Marilyn Turkovich

Role added on team:

"Marilyn is the Executive Director of the Charter for Compassion."

Brioné's profile
Brioné LaThrop

Role added on team:

"Brione is a co-founder of Compassionate United Arab Emirates."

Sommer's profile
Sommer Albertsen

Role added on team:

"Sommer is a member of the Compassion Games Leadership Team."

Phil's profile
Phil Lane

Role added on team:

"Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr. is Chairperson of the Compassion Games International."

Seren's profile
Seren Dalkiran

Role added on team:

"Co-founder of the Synergized Earth Network. Initiator Millennial Motion: The Next Generation of Leadership."

Pearl's profile
Pearl Gottschalk

Role added on team:

"Former Charitable Giving Ambassador at LUSH Cosmetics and Refugee Advisor to the World Bank."

Yan's profile
Scott's profile
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Attachments (4)

CompassionGamesImprovePhase.pdf

This is our "Improve Phase" summary and final submission. This integrates the feedback from beneficiaries and experts.

OpenIDEO Comments.pdf

This document contains selected comments that we have received during the beneficiary feedback phase. If you are looking for the User Experience Map go here http://bit.ly/2r79qN7. If you are looking for the consolidated feedback we are synthesizing go here http://bit.ly/2pCjFa6

CGI User Experience Map.pdf

This document has slides that walks through the user experience from discovering the Games, signing up to play, playing, reporting, and sharing. The feedback that we are gaining from this phase is organized in this online document http://bit.ly/2pCjFa6

IDEOGUG2017 (1).pdf

This is the original submission.

137 comments

Join the conversation:

Comment
Photo of OpenIDEO
Team

Hi Jon and Team!

We’re excited to share with you feedback and questions from the BridgeBuilder team and an external set of experts. We encourage you to think about this feedback as you continue to improve and refine your idea. You are welcome to respond in the comments section and/or to incorporate feedback into the text of your idea. Your idea and all associated comments will all be reviewed during the final review process.

One expert shared: “This is a really interesting model, which has clearly already built considerable scale. Well done! Impressive both for numbers involved and their global spread. I haven’t seen anything at this scale before quite like this!”

When thinking about desirability, feasibility and viability here’s what experts shared:
• One expert shared: “Yes it would be desirable if it encourages more people to get involved with acts of compassion. From your record it appears to be feasible and for a greater scale what additional resources would be needed? What would your plan for this look like.”

Human-centered design starts with the people you’re designing for and ends with new solutions that are tailor-made to suit their real needs. How does this idea consider user needs?
• Yes!

Outstanding comments and questions:
• The challenge is to scale it beyond those who already are involved in this work and how might you encourage more people to participate?
• How do you ensure that the main focus is on the needs of the recipient and not the person practicing compassion? I would like to know how the recipient of these compassionate acts is brought into the process and has a say on the compassion 'being done' to them. Otherwise my concern is that it might give the impression of an unequal power dynamic rather than the intended empowerment and collaboration.

Thank you so much for sharing the important work you are doing!

In case you missed it, check out this Storytelling Toolkit for inspiration for crafting strong and compelling stories: http://ideo.to/DXld5g Storytelling is an incredibly useful tool to articulate an idea and make it come to life for those reading it. Don’t forget - June 16 at 11:59PM PST is your last day to make changes to your idea on the OpenIDEO platform.

Have questions? Email us at bridgebuilder@ideo.com.

Looking forward to reading more!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you for the feedback... we are on it!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you for the expert feedback and the complete OpenIDEO experience to date. We have summarized our experiences to date in a document we have attached to our idea. You can link to the Improve Phase summary document here. http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

We wanted to reply and provide an answer a question contained in the expert feedback. The questions was:

“How do you ensure that the main focus is on the needs of the recipient and not the person practicing compassion? I would like to know how the recipient of these compassionate acts is brought into the process and has a say on the compassion 'being done' to them. Otherwise my concern is that it might give the impression of an unequal power dynamic rather than the intended empowerment and collaboration”

Thank you for this thoughtful feedback question. We think we understand the issue raised by the expert. The Compassion Games emphasize that empathy into action is the vital foundation of compassionate action. We will continue to convey and strengthen this message. As we build opportunities for people to connect and share their compassionate actions via the Compassion Report Map, social media, etc., we will see more peer-to-peer dialogue and conversations emerge about the actions and their impact. Thus, the conversation about compassion will deepen, and participants, recipients, and observers will exchange feedback and learn from each other in a win-win environment. In addition, strategies will be developed to encourage and support participants to obtain, and share input and feedback from recipients of their compassionate action(s).

The complete summary of our Improve Phase is in the following document http://bit.ly/2rpbgZf

Photo of Lisa Berkley
Team

Hi Jon and Compassion Games Team!

Just thought I would reach out here and see how you are doing... Also, wanted to let you know I told a friend about this in Israel/Palestine and I think they will participate in the next Games! We were talking about joint Israeli-Palestinian teams and also Israeli and Palestinian teams intentionally competing with each other... Will let you know how it goes!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you Lisa! This sounds really exciting and a great fit for the Games! We are finishing up the deliverables for the Improve Phase that is due on Friday. We have come to really appreciate and embrace OpenIDEO and the community. Please let us know how we can be most supportive!

Photo of Joey Crotty
Team

For the past 3+ years I have worked with the Compassion Games as a storyteller with a personal commitment to heal the core of our modern culture. I’d like to explain what that means, and why I believe Compassion Games has story worth telling in these pivotal times.

To be human is to live within a world of stories. Just as our ancestors did before us, we humans tell stories to make sense of the world that birthed us into existence, and these stories in turn weave us into - or away from - the living rhythms of the world. They tell us about the nature of who we are, what the world is like, why we are here, what is worth living for, where we have been, and where we are going.

Stories are indeed powerful. But… what happens to a society that gets its story wrong?

I believe the modern world today is intoxicated by such a wrong story, and the consequences have been disastrous. It is a story that depicts human nature in its most distorted, hurt, and misunderstood form. Human nature, this story tells us, is greedy and selfish, violent and domineering. The world is a “harsh, unforgiving place” that must be civilized, just like our savage nature. There are “good people,” and “bad people,” and we must compete with them in a free-for-all “survival of the fittest” to either “eat or be eaten.” According to this story, this is just “the way things are.”

It’s convincing to believe this story is true; from a thousand directions we receive its message. It inundates us in a tireless stream of bad news and disorienting political divisions. It goes on to justify ceaseless wars, the destruction of our Earth in the name of economic development, and the dehumanization and exploitation of our fellow human beings.

Yet, through the malaise of this nightmare scenario exists a nagging sense that this is not how the world should be. The human species did not survive for 200,000+ years on this planet by violently outcompeting every person in sight. We know this because stored within us, as real and natural as the lungs we inherited to breathe with, are the tender emotions so counter to the violence we witness unfurling around us. Within us is the strength to feel compassion for others, the need for intimacy to be truly well, the inclination to be cooperative, kind, and helpful to others.

Scientific research is beginning to validate what we have always felt: that we thrive when we have a mutual sense of being “seen,” “heard,” and “loved.” On the other hand, anger, hatred, and fear deteriorate the very physiology of a person. Such stress is the exact recipe for biological illness. We are simply not made to exist in such a perpetual state of trauma.

So, if this is true, why is the world so full of conflict, violence, division? This is where I believe healing the core of our modern culture is so essential, and why what the Compassion Games has to offer is so radically regenerative in this effort. The solution for the crises of the world are perhaps not to “be more loving/generous/peaceful,” but rather to *present the conditions from which love and compassion naturally can arise.* In other words, the problem is not human nature… it is the nature of a wrong story and its resulting infrastructure which denies human nature its fullest, most healthful expression.

Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville, Kentucky once said that “compassion is a contact sport.” If this is true, then our modern culture does not currently have a field vast enough to let the human family play on it. As a result, we cannot fully know what is possible should we try. The Compassion Games cleverly uses the existing “social scaffolding” of the world today - that of sport, competition, the Olympics, and a world bound by interconnectivity - and “reframes” them toward catalyzing a culture that is rich enough in its vision to hold the wondrous totality of human nature within it.

Such is, I believe, the real challenge of our time. We can only get there if isolation is thawed by the warmth of renewed community, despair relieved by the hands of joyfulness, abundance, and play. Compassion Games offers us an extraordinarily compelling way to get us onto that field. I hope to meet you there.

Photo of Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH
Team

Amazingly and beautifully said. Thank you Joey!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Yes.... well said. Your wisdom and insight are a gift to the world and to your generation. Thank you for bringing your talents, heart and soul to making the Games such a joy to the world!

Photo of Sadie Green
Team

Very cool ideas and designs! I love the win-win mindset, and it's great to see from your website that you already have teams playing Compassion Games in Nepal. Himalayan Children's Charities is also an Atlanta based organization working in Nepal, and I can definitely see the youth that we work with getting their game on! I look forward to exploring the possibilities and working together toward peace, prosperity, and planet. Love from Nepal, Sadie and the HCC family

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

This is great Sadie... we would love more teams in Nepal! In a "coopetition" no one can lose. We don't play against each other, we strive together to come up with fun and creative ways to catalyze compassionate action and service in our communities. The more people play, the more people win! Here is an inspiring short video of one of our Board Members, Pearl Praise Gottschalk, who was in Nepal working with children when the earthquake happened. In the short video she takes the Compassion Torch and shares her gratitude and intention for the world and her friends in Nepal. I think her message about how to transform the suffering is so compelling. Enjoy! https://youtu.be/VbOk2jXSF0I

Photo of Sadie Green
Team

Thanks, Jon! Wow, what a beautiful message and passing of the torch! I've shared this with my team of youth here in Nepal who are working with me to serve the women and children who lost their loved ones in the earthquake through our programs. I look forward to being in touch with you soon with concrete ways that we can collaborate!

Photo of An Old Friend
Team

Hi Jon

I love this idea, and just wanted to say thank you for contributing :)
I'm looking forward to keep an eye on this and see how it evolves!

Photo of Kate Rushton
Team

Hi Jon,

It is great to see all the comments and feedback on your idea from the OpenIDEO Chapters.

For your proposed project (see below), what would you focus on/expect to have achieved by year 1, 2 and 3?

'What is the timeline for your project idea? What are the key steps for implementation in the next 1-3 years?

Design and launch Compassionate Cities League and Global Unity Compassion Games: Building Bridges in June. Play in September. Scale annual Coopetitions. Over next 3 years - grow the League's: Compassionate Cities, Youth & Schools, Indigenous Peoples; advance the platform (integrated report maps, sign-up process, multilingual website, app development); stabilize core funding; establish customized Games for businesses and organizations; cultivate media partnerships.'

Are there connections with certain types of organisations that you would need/desire for the growth of Compassion Games?

I recall that you are keen to connect to organisations in China and Russia. Have you reached out to our Shanghai Chapter?

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Hi Kate,

Thank you so much for your comments and questions. Yes, we are excited to learn about the OpenIDEO City Chapters. Since our project is global, we reached out to all of the existing Chapters, including Shanghai, and requested their feedback on our project. We see the potential for collaboration and invitation to the OpenIDEO City Chapters to participate in the Compassion Games and especially our emerging Cities League.

We work closely with the Charter for Compassion International https://www.charterforcompassion.org and there are over 350 self-designated compassionate cities worldwide. 14 of the currently existing OpenIDEO City Chapters are also Compassionate Cities. So, we are very interested in promoting OpenIDEO to all the Compassionate Cities globally as well as engaging the current OpenIDEO City Chapters in the Games. One of our Compassion Games team members in Austin, Texas, has founded Compassionate Austin, and now, is in the process of mobilizing community members, including the Design Institute for Health and many others, to participate in creating the OpenIDEO Austin Outpost and then City Chapter.

Here are our preliminary responses to your questions (of course, we are open to the input and guidance of the continuing beneficiary feedback, the GHR Foundation, the expert reviewers, and OpenIDEO, in the process of prioritizing the steps of our project evolution):

For your proposed project (see below), what would you focus on/expect to have achieved by year 1, 2 and 3?

Our ultimate goal by year 3 (2020) is an exponential expansion of our reach and impact to engage and serve at least 100 million people in the Compassion Games. We have demonstrated growth in our participant numbers over time, and people express real benefit from playing and reporting. What we don't know is the best way to inspire and achieve a “self-replicating (viral) campaign” that reaches millions of teams and players by having players and teams share with others in a way that they share with others, etc.

We recognize the need to structure and restructure the Games iteratively, so they are easy for people to understand, play and share, and so that players gain personal benefit from participating, see the value of the Games for others, and can connect with each other.

In year 1, UNIFY http://peace.unify.org/ and Compassion Games are partnering to produce the World Peace and Global Unity Campaign as part of the September Compassion Games. The campaign is an opportunity to collaborate across divides, synchronize our shared intentions and gamify our compassionate action globally. The Campaign will launch on June 21 and culminate with a World Peace Weekend taking place on September 23 and September 24. Here is a map of Campaign Supporters so far http://bit.ly/2qwiXwe

The purpose of the campaign is to catalyze and quantify the shared impact of globally synchronized activities, and events focused on peace, compassionate action, and community service. Campaign participants connect globally synchronized events to compassionate action in local communities around the world. We synchronize globally and organize locally. During the campaign and Games, we will unify +2,500 locations around the world engaging in peace activities and meditations. We will link them to organize compassionate acts and service projects locally and then have these results reported and shared via the Compassion Report Map. http://reports.compassiongames.org

Also, in the September 2017 Compassion Games, we will launch the Compassionate Cities League. The goal of the league is uniting individuals and teams from leading organizations in cities to engage in a “coopetition” i.e. friendly competition that brings citizens together to learn about each other and do good deeds and service in a global expression of action for a better tomorrow. The league is a more advanced form of play in the Compassion Games and will include new Compassion Impact Measures.

Throughout years 1-3, we will conduct the Compassion Games 5 times each year (September, November, January, February, and April). Each set of the Games will evolve based on the cyclical design thinking, learning, and iterative process, while we keep our 2020 goal in mind.

The Olympic Games are in Tokyo during the Summer of 2020 ending on August 9. We are planning a major event as part of the September 2020 Global Unity Compassion Games. What we do between now and then will build momentum towards the goal of reaching some unknown threshold number of people that tips the planet towards a just and sustainable future. Achieving scale is our focus and why we think we can be a bridge that meets our shared goals for realizing the global good.

SEE NEXT COMMENT

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

What is the timeline for your project idea? What are the key steps for implementation in the next 1-3 years?

As design thinking suggests, you can think of time as a circle instead of a line. So in place of a timeline imagine a circle that has cycles with three phases: “innovate - learn - scale up.”

Each Coopetition completes one of these cycles. Each full Compassion Games season, from September through April includes five global coopetitions. So we will organize at least 15 more coopetitions. We are on a journey to learn how to unify and serve on a mass level. There is a rule of thumb regarding learning-curves that says “each time you double your volume you double your learning curve”. We are excited to discover and maintain the conditions that allow us to take the Games to scale.

In addition to scaling the number of players and partners by expanding, replicating and collaborating we need to scale the “game design framework and platform” to be responsive and inspiring to an intergenerational and cross-cultural community of players and partners. We will maintain and grow our communications channels, including our website, social media sites, apps, and Impact and Story Maps. As we have access to resources, we will implement technical design improvements throughout the three years in an iterative development and learning process, starting with improvements to our website, Impact and Story mapping, and sharing via social media.

Through each of the Compassion Games, we will make iterative improvements in the Compassionate Cities League. We will also use the Cities League as a model, applying what we learn to launch other leagues such as a School League in Year 2.

Are there connections with certain types of organizations that you would need/desire for the growth of Compassion Games?

We need to stabilize our core funding so we can build with confidence and strength. We are growing through collaborations with strategic partners like UNIFY, Charter for Compassion, Play for Peace, Points of Light, URI, Parliament of World Religions, Fetzer Institute, and many others. Via this OpenIDEO Challenge, we hope to partner further with the GHR Foundation, OpenIDEO, expert advisors, and the cohort of projects. We need to continue to build and expand upon these collaborative partnerships and also identify strategic partners and donors to sustain our staffing infrastructure and Game Design Framework and Platform.

To grow the teams and players, it's ideal to work with coalitions and alliances like OpenIDEO that are aggregators of players and teams. As expressed above, we see great potential for collaboration with the OpenIDEO City Chapters. Also, we’d love to help connect, through the Compassion Games, the many remarkable projects and organizers that surface through the OpenIDEO Challenges. One wonderful thing about the Compassion Games is that they are all-inclusive.

We would love to learn from the OpenIDEO “Disability and Inclusion” Challenge participants about the best ways to make the Compassion Games accessible for people with disabilities. We’d like to invite these projects to participate in the Games and give specific feedback.

By exploring IDEO, OpenIDEO and Design Thinking, we have become very interested in a Stanford-specific collaboration. Dr. James Doty at the Stanford CCARE (Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education) is one of the Compassion Games mentors and advisors. What if we brought together the Compassion Games, IDEO/David Kelley, the Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school), the Peace Innovation Lab, and the Stanford Medical School CCARE? We understand that as part of the Peace Innovation Lab there is a Stanford Game Design Thinking Research Group that “... studies the intersection of game design (as a science), behavior design, and neuroscience.” It would be wonderful to involve these various experts in advancing the design of the Compassion Games and an assessment of the impact.

I recall that you are keen to connect to organizations in China and Russia. Have you reached out to our Shanghai Chapter?

Yes, thank you. We did reach out to the Shanghai Chapter. Please see our response above. When you look at the Compassion Report Map http://reports.compassiongames.org you can see where we've yet to engage. For the Compassion Games to truly be global, we want to establish a presence everywhere on the planet. We see compassion as the bridge that unifies humanity, and therefore we want to make sure to include everyone, and no one is left out.

Photo of Yan Golding
Team

I must first confess that I have never played or organised a Compassion Game! But now, after getting a deeper impression of the evolution and scope of Compassion Games and the Compassionate Cities Movement, the inspiring network of changemakers you are bringing together, and the spectacular feedback that have read in the comments here, I feel deeply inspired to both experience a game AND to explore how I and the United Earth community and network can help bring Compassion Games to the global scale.
Like you say, compassion is the bridge that connects and unifies humanity. United Earth is rapidly becoming a global platform that is committed to serving, supporting, synthesizing and showcasing the most innovative models, practices, experiments and solutions for a peaceful, just and healthy planet.
The Compassion Games seem to usher in our evolutionary leap into a culture of peace, compassion and cooperation in truly playful, accessible and practical ways. The world needs this now more than ever.
Jon and Team, I am really excited to see how I and our teams can support and possibly co~create with the Compassion Games community in future events.
I look forward to learning and experiencing more from your field.
I am / We are at (y)our service.
www.united-earth.vision

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Hi Yan, Your comments are wonderful. The fact that you have never played the Compassion Games but are now inspired to get involved as a result of what we shared and what you've read in these comments from the other people is deeply gratifying. Our biggest challenge and opportunity is to discover what we don't know the knowing of which will lead to this becoming a "viral participatory campaign" in which millions and millions of people join in. Having united earth be a part of making this happen would be a dream come true! Thank you for your support!

Photo of Yan Golding
Team

Thank you, Jon! We are all coming together to make our shared dreams come true. :) It's an honour and pleasure to be here and now with you and this dream-into-reality-team that you/we are gathering.

I wish to share with you all a Global Unified Action that United Earth initiated on the March Equinox called "Inspire the World Initiatives". The invitation, intention and vision for Inspire the World is "to co~create the world's most inspiring and inclusive positive news and solutions-awareness campaign".
Of course we would love for Compassion Games, Compassionate Cities and other CG partners to join! Over 30 groups including Permaculture Magazine, Findhorn’s New Story Hub, One Community Global, Great Transition Stories, Gaia Academy, EARTHwise Centre, The Great Transition Initiative, The Global Purpose Movement and GOOD of the WHOLE are already on board.
Here's a link: https://medium.com/@yangolding/open-invitation-to-inspire-the-world-initiatives-e90e7162cc04

Inspire the World Initiatives are already taking form through our first campaign called "Food & Water for All" (FW4A) in response to the famine crises in Africa. As you may well know the UN have estimated that more than 20 million people could starve to death in the coming months!!

Through the FW4A campaign it is our intention to:
~ To support immediate solutions by mapping, tracking and showcasing those projects (like the LOVE ARMY) and organizations (like ARAHA) with the most effective strategies and practical actions to prevent famine and starvation.
~ To openly promote and facilitate cooperation and collaboration among these groups.
~ To facilitate an open dialogue exploring the immediate solutions.
fb-group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/794491627394058/
~ To promote the vast possibilities, solutions and innovations for ensuring sustainable food and water security and sovereignty at the local level and in all climatic conditions.

We now know that there are numerous ways through which we can eliminate starvation, and it is increasingly recognised that the obstacles are primarily economic and political.
While one key element of the bigger vision is to help ensure the basic human rights of food and water for all human beings, we see this kind of urgent intervention as a fundamental and response-able expression of compassion.

Within the Food & Water for All campaign we are now conceiving of a sub-campaign called "We Stand With Africa". I feel especially excited to invite Compassion Games and partners to explore how / if the games can connect to this urgent cause.

Additional intentions for the We Stand With Africa campaign are multidimensional:
1. To help grow public awareness about the famine crises.
2. To empower the public with information and practical ways to support the We Stand With Africa campaign.
3. To connect with like-hearted and solutions-oriented organisations throughout Africa – especially youth groups, women's groups and permaculture & ecovillage groups – and to encourage and facilitate transdisciplinary awareness and cooperation.
4. To honour and to give back to Mama Africa. The so-called developed world has risen primarily on the exploitation of African people and the continent's abundant wealth of natural resources. The cradle of our humanity is calling us back to the true spirit of Ubuntu.
5. To honour and build on the courageous and unifying actions of Standing Rock.
6. To continue building the movement through a series of “We Stand” unified actions. The following envisioned action may be “We Stand for Peace” that will invite and explore focussed and coherent action among the numerous emerging global peace movements.

I look forward to hearing how you all resonate with these actions and invitations!

With Love, and on behalf of the United Earth co~creative community,
Yan

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Congratulations on your publication of “Inspire the World Initiatives”. Given your unique position in the world and through the creation of United Earth it seems like you are eminently qualified to pull this together and make it known. Bravo to you and United Earth!

As I understand it the Food and Water for All and We Stand With Africa are two campaigns that are closely related and part of these initiatives.

Here’s a possible way that these initiatives and Compassion Games can be mutually supportive. Let me start out speaking from the compassion games perspective because that is most familiar to me and I can see how we can be supportive of what I think you're trying to do.

The "game design framework" that we've been building for the last few years makes it easy to bring in new teams and new ways to play. I suggest that United Earth sign up as a team. The food and water for all (FW4A) and even the We Stand with Africa can “plug in” as different ways for people to play in the Compassion Games. We also have players and partners who have contacts in Africa or in teams that support Africa, that may be of use. Let me know if you want to continue down this path. Thanks again for all the good work you do and look forward to continued collaboration.

Photo of Rebecca
Team

The Compassion Games provide a platform to highlight what’s already working best, grow networks for good, and maximize capacity for goal sharing, communications, and collective impact in community.
The Other is My Brother: Societal cooperation is about relationships. Come to any relationship with an open heart and rolled up sleeves and the best that resides within us manifests itself. The Compassion Games exemplifies this by focusing on the positive and the possible. Conceived to enliven the core tenets of the Charter for Compassion, the CG’s mindfully and creatively invite us to realize tangible ways to live in right relationship with one another and Mother Earth. Undeniably, the foundational human experience of each person born into this world is that of cooperation. Reciprocally, caregivers and new humans listen and learn one another’s rhythms without language, communicating through actions and sounds which feel safe and familiar for both. Through this process, connections are made, bonds strengthened and established. We become ‘hardwired’ to love. Not to only love, but also to trust--and trust is the dearest currency which we can trade in. Since 2012 I have seen a multitude of ways in which the CG’s have catalyzed a growing movement. We team up and turn out to uplift neighbors who are not yet friends. Our ethnicity, culture, social standing, and language may be different but each one of us holds a deep and abiding respect for the “other,” and all of us share an Esperanto of the heart.
Plug and Play: Civic groups, schools, houses of worship, and businesses presently engaged in community service have the ability to “plug-in and play” the CG’s to fit the structure and style of their organizational culture. Individuals and teams choose the level of participation which suits them best. Share what you’ve discovered on the Compassion Map. Another team or org may adopt your strategy. Open source peer-to-peer communication is an integral part of the Compassion Games continued growth and development. Helping Hands: During the 2016 Global Unity Games hosted in partnership with, ‘Tomorrow Together’ on the U.S. National Day of Service, 15th anniversary of those lost on 9/11 were remembered. 2,000 volunteers from 40 diverse faith and social justice organizations packed and delivered more than 500,000+ meals for NYC area residents at risk of hunger, in an effort to demonstrate the importance of religious tolerance and inclusion. This was the largest attended charitable activity recorded in NYC. It’s sister event in Washington DC prepared 1.5 million meals on the day!
Honoring the Sacred: In the spirit of intercultural understanding, and in support of Water Protectors at Standing Rock, the Compassion Torch was lifted on Dec. 10th, UN Human Rights Day, in a ceremony of Global “Wopida” a Dakota expression of Gratitude. CG International Chairman Chief Phil Lane Jr. Inhanktowan Dakota, sought to share its, “profound, infinite, eternal meaning and transforming spiritual energy. The purpose of this spiritual understanding of Wopida requires each of us to live with honor, compassion, love, respect and harmony with all life… it recognizes that the Hurt of One is the Hurt of All and the Honor of One is the Honor of All and that we are intimately related as an integral part of all Life. We are all relatives!” #WaterIsLife CG’s successfully partnered w/multiple orgs sharing interactive media platforms to offer perspectives in gratitude from many indigenous, environmental and faith leaders located at several sacred spaces worldwide. Participants were encouraged to turn inward in personal reflection, and also offered--in equal measure--the opportunity to ask questions of those whose culture and heritage were different from their own. Upwards of 50,000+ listeners, FB livestream viewers (and learners) took part. Wielded wisely social media serves to unify and empower: “Imagine a platform that brings you together locally and globally. Combine the reach of the cloud with the power of the crowd. Connect leaders, experts, companies, organizations and citizens. Share your tools data, designs, successes and ideas. Turn them into action.” TED City 2.0 Looking Ahead: There was a time when a handful of committed people joined together in community meetings seeking to identify local needs and meet them, today there is a vast network of thousands. This unfolding is the result of the CGs’ design which has evolved to involve the many voices and people(s) from all walks of life who take part.
Presently the CG’s are primarily played in English. If afforded the resources, the CG’s could offer capacity building training in its mission and methodology in several languages, enabling the CG's to be culturally attuned and regionally focused.Through engagement in the CG's, unique talents, skills and life experiences find their place in the sun. In each of us glows a divine spark, and those who wish to live in a culture of peace longs to share it.

Photo of Karli
Team

This is an incredible, world-changing project. Compassion can sometimes be a nice idea that people talk about, but the Compassion Games are actually getting people out into their communities and taking ACTION! Compassion in action. This is powerful!

Photo of Katherine
Team

I look forward to seeing the Compassion Games supported, expanded, and sustained as an excellent starting point for collective engagement in compassionate action. Game on!
Katherine Van Uum

Photo of Holly Glogau-Morgan
Team

Compassion Games was the answer to our needs when it comes to a school wide community service program. I work for Bridgeway Homeschool Academy. While we are based out of Catasaqua, PA, we have students all over the globe. Bringing them together in service was a challenge. The past couple of years I ran an event just for the high school where they would donate to a select organization and learn about the country and specific needs those funds would be addressing - via weekly emails. While it was good, it didn't really bring anyone together and wasn't something all of Bridgeway could participate. I heard about Compassion Games from a player in the UAE and looked into it.

Well, it has been PERFECT for us! We just finished up the Water is Life event, and I've never seen such participation levels before! I kept the journal component in, using the provided questions from the daily mission emails. We currently have 1,600 full time students and a few hundred part time ones. A very high percentage of families participated in Water is Life. The students started posting about it on their forum right away and the conversation is still going! They really enjoyed the daily missions, even the younger students had fun and learned a lot. So many of the journal entries brought tears to my eyes. These children and teens didn't realize the damage being done to our Earth. They also didn't realize such simple steps could help the entire planet. I am so proud of them for taking this new event and running with it! In the end, we had over 900 students who indicated in a survey that they participated. We tallied the hours and money raised and it was amazing! The middle and high school students were encouraged to turn in journals (required for the high school students to get service credit) and I spent days reading them. I'm still putting them up on the map, three weeks later!

Compassion Games is EXCELLENT for organizations like homeschool co-ops, fully accredited programs like Bridgeway Homeschool Academy, private schools and more. The missions are engaging. The map is awesome and a great way for them to see what is going on around them and participate. I love what the students are learning about, as we all must be more aware of the people around us and planet we have been given to take care of. We are looking forward to the Global Unity Games. While we are a "Christian" organization, many of our students are not. I'm looking forward to having those with different belief systems interacting in a positive manner. We have most major ones represented and it will be good to see them come together and form a common bond.

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Holly, What can I say? I am so grateful for you sharing this with us. This is what it's all about - that the Games can help build these bridges for connecting and learning from each other and our collective good makes it all worthwhile. The next time I find myself wondering why we are putting so much into this, I'll come back and read your comment! Now our goal is to bring this to scale and enroll thousands and thousands of teams to play so we can serve over 1 billion people. We're here on your team and stand ready to help you expand and replicate what you've started. Congratulations!

Photo of Brioné LaThrop
Team

Holly, I can't tell you how excited I am to hear just how successful the engagement has been with Bridgeway and the Compassion Games. It was a lengthy process getting the approvals and I truly appreciate your persistence, commitment and excitement along the journey. I am so happy to learn that as many of the families participated as did students. Thank you Holly, look forward to seeing Bridgeway grow their coopetition as a new team member.

Photo of Pradeep
Team

very good reflection

Photo of Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH
Team

Thank you so much Pradeep . It is so wonderful to connect with you via the @OpenIDEO Delhi Chapter. We are appreciating such valuable connections with the OpenIDEO Chapters and hope to expand those connections and collaborations. I hope that people reading this will visit the OpenIDEO Delhi Chapter to see the input you shared with us there and our ongoing conversation.
How exciting to be able to bring our ideas and actions together on this platform!

Photo of Amanda Cook
Team

Participating in the Compassion Games for the last year and a half, has been an incredible experience. The Play for Peace community has come to love and look forward to participating in the Compassion Games events. I love that there is no wrong way to play the Compassion Games, it allows for the compassionate creativity to flow.
Jon and Sommer, you have been amazing supports through this process and wonderful people to get to know.
Looking forward to the next round of the Compassion Games. Thanks for everything!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you, Amanda. What makes the Compassion Games great are the remarkable teams that have embraced and made the Games their own; like Play for Peace who bring "cooperative play" into conflict zones around the world https://playforpeace.org/. Thanks to Play for Peace we just had a team from Greece with members that were all refugees from war-torn countries. There are so many great reports from the PfP (Play for Peace) teams posted on the Compassion Report Map http://reports.compassiongames.org Here is also a short interview with Sarah Gough, Executive Director of Play for Peace talking about our partnership https://youtu.be/8XWO-nb_3Ko?list=PLSQnbX2AAjZcdIOHMxgV7RyuruEgpIuek We are so grateful for this partnership and what we have accomplished together so far... Go Play for Peace!!

Photo of Brioné LaThrop
Team

The Compassion Games, Survival of the Kindest have become global change agents to inspire and engage millions of people globally to promote peace through play and giving. It's an incredible concept and we have been honoured to foster this coopetition in the most compassionate country on planet earth, the United Arab Emirates.

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you, Brione.  I can hear the spirit of "coopetition" as you claim that the United Arab Emirates is the most compassionate country on earth! If you look at the Compassion Report Map you can see the many remarkable events and activities that have come from the Team Compassionate UAE. http://reports.compassiongames.org You might just get a number of other countries to take you up on the challenge. Just the other day we met with folks from Compassionate Australia that are aiming to be the most compassionate continent!

Photo of Sommer Albertsen
Team

Thank you Brione for your support! Yes Brione, there is a high chance Compassionate United Arab Emirates is the most compassionate Country in the world. There is measured compassionate proof and impact shining brightly from UAE on the Compassion Report Map. Game on! Let's see where in the world has the edge on kindness.

Photo of Holly Glogau-Morgan
Team

Thank you, Brione, for telling me and Bridgeway Homeschool Academy about Compassion Games! We are loving being part of this wonderful program.

Photo of Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH
Team

This OpenIDEO Challenge is a perfect fit for the “Compassion Games”!
I have listened to the entire TED talk of His Holiness Pope Francis that was shared in the May 16th OpenIDEO Bridgebuilder Challenge Newsletter and that speaks to the original inspiration for the Challenge: https://www.ted.com/talks/pope_francis_why_the_only_future_worth_building_includes_everyone?language=en . What a profound and inspiring message and so important for our time! Pope Francis speaks about the importance of each of us and our need for solidarity, compassion, inclusivity, tenderness, humility, and concrete action to care for others. He speaks of hope. Each one of us can make a difference. He speaks to the need for compassion in the development of technology and scientific advances.

As I see it, compassion is the hallmark expression of Design Thinking.
Compassion = Empathy + Action to address needs. It is the core, driving power-source for social innovation. It is the compelling motivation that brings us to the table to address personal and social challenges. Research supports that the practice of “3D” Compassion (caring for others, self, and the Earth) is essential for personal well-being and social and planetary good.
As a global society, we need to recognize and value the importance of cultivating compassion skills.
Only when we have a critical mass of individuals taking steps in their own lives for peace, prosperity, and the planet will we be able to achieve those goals.
How do we engage people on a regular and repeated basis to practice, strengthen, and celebrate compassionate action in their own lives, their communities, and globally?
How do energize people everywhere and make the practice of compassion our society’s expectation, our social norm?
We need to marshal our ingenuity to achieve a radical shift in focus!
We need to give the practice of compassion a creative presence and visible, recognizable identity. We need to motivate people to experience compassion action so that it ignites the spark and fans the flame within them. Practice of any kind needs support to develop lifelong habits. We need to make the practice of compassion a supported and celebrated priority in our social structure. Compassionate action needs to be fed and nurtured so it can grow. If compassion is the fuel for social innovation, we must design methods to replenish, fortify, and expand the fuel supply. These efforts are essential to the success of all social impact endeavors.
The Compassion Games brings this radical shift to the world!
The Games compel us to join together to make compassion a living, breathing, ever-evolving and expanding force for good.
I am currently reading the book “Brainstorm” by Daniel J. Siegel, MD. His research and recommendations support the worth of the Compassion Games. In this book, he is exploring the changes in the adolescent mind. He states, “…the power of the adolescent mind has just the spark of emotion and social drive, just that push to explore new solutions to old ways of doing things, that may save life on our planet.” He continues, “And if adults can gain insight into these same fundamental aspects of the adolescent mind, they, too, will have healthier and happier lives.”… “The mind is truly ‘plastic’ – changeable through experience—and it is possible at any age to move it toward greater health and harmony.” “Mindsight practices” he recommends to help the brain continue “to grow in integrative ways throughout [a person’s] life” include “playtime” and “connecting time.” Play is the “basis of creativity and innovation” and generates “the pleasure of presence and connection.” Connecting time is “when we connect to other people and the planet.” The qualities of connecting time involve gratitude, generosity, and giving back to other people and the planet.” “When we connect with other people in positive ways, when we wish others to be happy, to be successful at what they do, to have joy and health in their lives, we bring a compassionate stance that supports something called ‘empathic joy’—getting joy from another’s well-being. I know it sounds quite different from the usual competitive environment that modern society cultivates. But just try it out and I think you’ll see that it’s a win-win situation again. Studies of how we function as people reveal that we are built to collaborate with one another. When we work together in these supportive ways, the collective intelligence created is much more powerful than the solo person trying to beat out others.” “Connecting with the planet can also mean doing more than simply being in nature, it can mean taking care of our environment… The Earth is our common home, other people our tribe, and all living beings our relatives.”

I hope we can all come together through this OpenIDEO opportunity to support and enhance the Compassion Games to ignite a revolution of compassion worldwide for positive personal and social impact!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you, Lesa. You are a great partner in this and thank you for introducing us to OpenIDEO. This challenge does fit so well with the vision and mission of the Compassion Games. The insights in your comment speak volumes about how "design thinking" and the "compassion games" go hand in hand. While we share the impact of the Compassion Games with a new community, we are also growing our capacity as a team to embrace this approach to reaching to scale. The challenge is supporting our aim to reach "sustainable impact at scale" by linking innovation, learning and the process of scaling up. Thank you Lesa and thank you OpenIDEO!

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Team

The Compassion Games and the over 500,000 people that have volunteered are changing the world and giving hope to others. It is amazing to see how the games are growing and to consider what benefit this could have for humanity. It truly takes us all being engaged and learning to stretch ourselves and go beyond the level of compassion we thought was possible. The Compassion Games gives us this opportunity and a chance to make a better world. There's no doubt, people all across the world can benefit.

Photo of Jon Ramer
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Thank you for this encouraging comment! "In the end, everyone will know that everyone did it!"

Photo of Anu Jain
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Dear Compassionate Games Team

Congratulations on your wonderful initiative to bring change into the world. Wanted to bring to your attention a group called Service Space: https://www.servicespace.org. It seems like both the teams are fully dedicated to serving others and growing compassion.

Best wishes
Anu

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Hi Anu - Thank you for your comment. Yes! We know, appreciate, and admire Service Space; their founder Nipun Mehta has supported the Games in a number of meaningful ways��. For example, he introduced us to another Champion of Compassion, Nimo Patel from Empty Hands Music http://www.emptyhandsmusic.org/

We'd love to have you participate in the Games. Please let us know if we can be supportive in any way! Game on!

Photo of Anu Jain
Team

Thanks Jon! Will certainly participate in the Games and keep you all posted. I will share with my family, and see if we can do it together.

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Awesome! Don't forget to share your experience here.... this is the Compassion Report Map with Agents of Compassion from all over the world sharing and reflecting on their results.... https://s3.amazonaws.com/compassionreports/index.html

Photo of Sande Hart
Team

How do we change the story? How do change the narrative from fear to compassion? How do we evolve to a society of kindness, generosity, partnership and health and well-being? How do we move a critical mass of everyday citizens to a culture of peace and harmony, and transform competition into collaboration and fear of the other into collaboration that has generational impact? I have organized Compassion Games in my community for the past several years and I am constantly surprised by the new stories and new relationships that reverberate long after the coopetitions of the annual Compassion Games. When you "play" with others, fear is replaced with wonder, scarcity is replaced with hope and abundance, power-over is replaced with power-with, and competition is replaced with coopetition. The Games make us take stock of our community, and realize that it's easy and fun to bring along one more volunteer, volunteer 1 more hour, raise 1 more dollar, and serve 1 more person suffering. We realize that we can stretch our compassion just a little bit further than we ever thought possible, and it was in us all along, just invited by the whimsical and playful challenges. Just play in the Compassion Games one time and you will have expanded your own understanding of what is possible. Isn't that what is necessary to create a culture of peace and one that works for everyone? Does it not come down to our own personal capacity for compassion and love?

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you Sande! Your dedication and unwavering commitment has contributed immensely to the Compassion Games and the International Campaign for Compassionate Cities. Together we have learned so much! How our "playing can be our learning" and become a way to move out of our "comfort zones", into our "stretch zone" where change takes place. It's a challenge to be creative to come up with ways to move people from the sidelines and out onto the playing field where they discover the power of service and compassion in action. Thank you for our partnership!

Photo of Sande Hart
Team

Indeed- and we have to remember that stretching often is uncomfortable, leaves us a little sore, takes courage and leaves marks. The Games turns marks from war wounds into medals of honor!

Photo of Sande Hart
Team

Indeed- and we have to remember that stretching often is uncomfortable, leaves us a little sore, takes courage and leaves marks. The Games turns marks from war wounds into medals of honor!

Photo of Monica Willard
Team

The Compassion Games add joy and creativity as they engage people of all ages in doing acts of kindness and compassion in their daily life. They offer a platform that connects cities, schools, organizations and individuals to the impact of individual acts of compassion and to collective goodwill. This planet needs all the compassion we can encourage!! The Compassion Games brings kindness and inclusiveness into daily conversation and actions. What positive nutrition this adds to our public and private conversations!

I encourage friends to check out the games and add your comments. Make your first contribution to The Compassion Games be your message of support!

Photo of Jon Ramer
Team

Thank you, Monica Willard. Your encouragement of others is much appreciated. Monica is the Main URI (United Religions Initiative) at the UN and has worked with the UN Department of Public Information (DPI) on the annual International Day of Peace at UN Headquarters since 1997. She also organizes a team and participates in the Compassion Games from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Monica is on the board of Peace Jam another team that participates in the Games. We are grateful for the partnerships she has helped us build! Game on!!

Photo of carole null
Team

This is so innovative and the first of its kind I have heard of. Compassion encompasses all that is desired for a peaceful prosperous world and is needed now more than ever. Compassion for the planet and all other living beings can be universally understood.
I would agree on the need to involve schools either through clubs or in their curriculum as this ensures a wider cover for students. Students are key as perceptions, behaviors and habits are formed early in life. For adults that like to game or can be inspired to do so, some rural areas have minimal internet access. Setting up of off line gaming methods like community computer labs that require little power usage with provision of SD cards could help.
In Kenya, the government is in stages providing free laptops to all primary school children. Collaboration with this kind of programme would ensure installation of the game APP into the laptops that will be used both at school and at home to increase outreach.
This is something that can be adopted even by the disabled to eliminate social isolation and build their confidence.
All the best! I would love to play.

Photo of Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH
Team

Hi carole . Thank you so much for your comment! I think it is especially wonderful since we connected to you by reaching out via the OpenIDEO Nairobi Chapter! We are excited about all the potential to build participation and collaboration in the Compassion Games with the help of the OpenIDEO Chapter communication platform. You demonstrate that collaboration! The ideas you've expressed in your comment put forward all sorts of wonderful ways we can work together to bring the Compassion Games to life throughout Nairobi and Kenya, creating a model for other cities and countries. I've had the privilege of visiting Nairobi and other places in Kenya. Beautiful people and a beautiful country! Thank you again for your valuable feedback. We are eager to talk with you directly and support your participation in the Games and collaborate with you and the OpenIDEO Nairobi Chapter on your suggestions!

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Carole, the idea of linking the games to free laptops computers provided by the government is sterling. I believe that there are organizations out there that refurbish computers and if somehow we could make contact with them and get the app put on them--might allow for students in more villages to participate in the games.

Also, how can the games become more localized? promote more solidarity among groups of children? Having spent some time in Limuru I remember the importance of shared activities. How do we integrate culture, sharing and kindness that elevates our understanding of each other and the incredible beauty of difference in society? Are there local school organizations or even the ministry of education that might promote the games? Thank you for your thoughts.

Photo of carole null
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It would definitely be nice Lesa to have the Games in Kenya. I look forward to contact and collaboration on the same. I am glad you enjoyed your visit here! Welcome again.

Photo of carole null
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The computers are imported through a tender process and yes I am certain there are organisations here that would refurbish them. I would see approaching the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology to adopt the games for refurbishment phase and localisation of games as the best course. Please do come again to visit and empower.

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The Global Compassion Games have been the foundation for creating Compassionate New York. Through the Compassion Games, we have been able to connect with others who are committed to bringing compassion in every day living. We have explored difficult conversations and emcouraged youth to take compassionate action in their communities through the Compassion Games. Because of the Compassion Games, we were able to connect youth with resources to address gun violence, race, religion, mental health, and other issues impacting their communities. We admire and appreciate Jon and Sommer's enthusiasm and commitment to helping others use the Games to build awareness around compassion. We are excited to continue working with them to build pur network of compassionate leaders in New York and worldwide.

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Hi Marie.
I am located in NYC and am interested to learn more about the work being done by Compassionate New York. Is there a website?

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Hi Marie - thank you for sharing this. The way you have embraced the Compassion Games as the foundation for Compassionate NYC is exactly what we were hoping for when we started the Games. Now seeing this link with OpenIDEO is very promising. Bettina is involved in the NY chapter and I encourage you to make contact with her. Dr. Lesa Walker from Austin reached out to many of the chapters and there is a great fit between compassionate action and open innovation. As Lesa once said: "Compassion is the power source of social innovation!" Game on!!

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Team

Compassion Games is a wonderful and engaging experience. I have had the fortunate opportunity to participate in the last 2 years and organized several events, inviting a variety of people to play. We introduced audiences from various diverse and socio-economic backgrounds. The Zorthian family located in Altadena, for the environmental restoration project at Zorthian Ranch to the Compassionate Conversations about "Redefining Public Safety" in Watts and the Youth Summit in LA with Black Lives, Migrant Youth and LAPD, and all across the board, everyone was so excited to know that they contributing to a higher collective consciousness. This is exactly why the Compassion Games are so important right now, it connects to a higher collective consciousness of compassion, and as result is changing the planetary vibration! One thing that would make this experience more accessible, is if there was an integration or an app, that allowed you to post from Facebook, to the Compassion Map, Twitter, Instagram... and so on. Another thing that would be beneficial is if the Compassion Games were included in the curriculum at our schools and universities. I would love to see Facebook partner with the Compassion Games or other social media, so during Earth week and International Peace week, etc... more people would know and can participate.

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Thank you, Fe Love. It is great to hear from people who have experienced participating in the Games and have taken them to new heights; like you and your team. Your work integrating Compassionate Arts in Action and in particular bringing together groups that traditionally don't know and communicate with each other, and may even be at odds with each other, is inspiring and a great example of how we can transcend our self-imposed boundaries. Thank you again for your profound contribution to a world yearning to find peace and love.

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Thank you Fe Love for sharing your experience with the Games and your wonderful suggestions of ways to enhance outreach and participation!

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"We need more kindness, more compassion, more joy, more laughter. I definitely want to to contribute to that." Ellen DeGeneres
"Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of Nature and its beauty." Albert Einstein
The Compassion Games gives us a platform to be able to feed our need to be compassionate and to widen our circle of influence. What better goal could there be?

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Yes! Exactly! Thank you for your comment!

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Thank you, John. Discovering the compassion link between Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Einstein reminds me just how universal compassion is. I agree, I cannot imagine a better goal. Thanks for supporting the Games.

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Hi Team Compassion Games.
Thanks for sharing your work on OpenIDEO! Interesting concept! I saw a post on the NYC OpenIDEO Chapter asking us to check out your idea. Thanks for reaching out!
How is the experience of participating in the compassion games different from that of volunteering in a community or a regular basis, or participating in a service day with an employer? Do you have insights into whether participation in the games jumpstarts continued community engagement/service for participants?

I like the example you shared in your experience map! I looked at the map and listened to some of the audio from Lia. I love that aspects of the games within the high school in Pico, LA were student driven. Seems that that would be empowering for youth. The scope of the high school project was broad. Was the project longer than a week? Are "the games" a basic idea applied by communities to create projects focused on unique needs?

It would be nice to learn how the games impact individuals such as the high school students from your user experience map. How did participation effect relationships between peers, between administration and students, between students and their family members? After the games ended what was next? Did the games jumpstart further engagement around violence prevention in the school? Where there continued opportunities for community service, etc. etc?

Good luck developing Compassion Games!

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I believe you hit the nail right on the head Bettina: the games are jump starters to continued or renewed activity or the generator of something new. One of the ways that the Charter for Compassion integrates the games into our Compassion Cities Movement is that we invite our communities to get involved in the games so they can motivate others on the team who are working on a compassionate city--the more people involved in a game--the more ownership of the final product you have AND perhaps as importantly, you hear more voices expressing different perspectives on the team--diversity in a non-competitive exchange can really bind the group together. Eliminating competition and striving for a collective goal eliminates a lot of "personal baggage" from the play and strengthens the final product whether that be collecting food to fill the shelves of a community food pantry or cleaning up and beautifying a local park. Think about the challenges that a team can come up with after evaluating their successes from playing the Games: committing to keep the food pantry shelves full in the most difficult months of the year, collecting stories from the local community, assessing problems that are tormenting the community, etc. Perhaps one need is lack of housing: pulling together teams to work with Habitat or work to create a community of small houses. It is endless as to the ideas that people have when they come together and work together to solve problems. We have so many incredible examples of this happening through our compassionate city movements--many sparked by the Compassion Games.

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Thank you, Bettina. It is fabulous to have members of OpenIDEO commenting and contributing to our development of the Compassion Games. Thank you, Dr. Lesa Walker for reaching out on our behalf.

The simplest measure of success at the high school in LA is that they continued to play the Compassion Games even when the students that led it had graduated. (This is also the case in the Women's Correctional Facility that has played the Games for three years.)

They play the games a few times throughout the year. By having the Games sourced by the youth it ensures that the games are grounded in their lived experiences and concerns. Lia was incredibly inventive in getting the students to play given their extremely challenging life situation. I'm so glad you listened to her tell the story about how the school pulled this off, including getting the boys to open up and talk about their feelings in a climate where being compassionate can be seen as soft and weak. If anyone else wants to read/hear this story go here http://bit.ly/2pEve1s There is also a link to her dissertation that focuses on the impact of the Compassion Games in prison.

When we started out we also wondered if the Games would lead to new activities and events or just knit together what was already happening. I am happy to tell you that the answer is both -- the Games knit together "mutually rewarding activities" as well as leads to new ways to play that would have never happened without the Games.

We are looking forward to getting to know the OpenIDEO chapters and see if we can weave our strategies together!

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Bettina Fliegel  I am so glad to see your comment. Thank you! It's been a wonderful experience connecting with the OpenIDEO Chapter members in different cities and receiving your input.

I would like to respond to your question of how the experience of participating in the Compassion Games is different from that of volunteering in a community on a regular basis, or participating in a service day with an employer? The Games provide heightened attention to the importance of your work, providing a global platform to highlight what you do. You become part of a virtual global team of people, all working to address local and global needs. By reading the stories and reports of compassionate action on the Compassion Report Map, you can learn about other approaches and strategies of engagement. The Compassion Games celebrate your work and encourage you to do so as well. Research documents that compassion "fatigue" can be alleviated and prevented when compassion satisfaction is addressed and increased through recognition and celebration of progress.

Sometimes, I use the analogy of the Olympic Games to help explain the Compassion Games. The Olympic Games inspire people to practice and strengthen physical skills and seek excellence in their own lives and local communities. The Olympic Games also bring about a global energy and celebration of the human spirit, demonstrating the capacity of people to overcome barriers through sports. Thus, the Olympic Games create a new level of attention to achievement that is different from that which comes from localized participatory effort alone. The Compassion Games are similar in that regard. However, some differences exist between the Olympic Games and the Compassion Games: 1) Whereas the Olympics focus on sports, the Compassion Games encompass compassion action in all dimensions (caring for others, self, and the Earth); 2) Whereas the Olympic Games emphasize "competition," the Compassion Games frame a new perspective of "coopetition" where everyone wins. Collaboration is key and people strive to elevate themselves as well as everyone else; and 3) Whereas the Olympic Games highlight a special few who have excelled over others to rise to the top, the Compassion Games highlight and honor all comers, from those doing simple personal acts of kindness to those involved in more complex community-wide events, etc. AND, the Compassion Games reinforce the message that every action matters.

We do much in our societies throughout the world to practice, honor, and celebrate physical, as well as intellectual and artistic, endeavors and talent. However, the global acknowledgement and intentional focus on the importance of compassionate skills development and practice is missing. Increasingly, scientific research documents the critical importance of the practice and strengthening of compassion skills for well-being (emotional, physical, economic, etc.) at the personal and community levels.

A key feature of the Compassion Games is the integration of the 3 dimensions of compassion (caring for other, self, and the Earth). It is important to strengthen action in all 3 dimensions since they are interdependent and synergistic. The Compassion Games call us to examine these dimensions in our lives. We may have more strength in 1 or 2 of the dimensions and may discover that we have overlooked a dimension. Many times our work efforts or community volunteerism may focus on 1 dimension predominantly. Keeping the 3 dimensions in mind is critical since each dimension is essential to create effective strategies in addressing local and global challenges.

Consider the example of designing a car to meet the needs of people with disabilities. Design-thinking involves creating a design utilizing the core value of empathy. In most instances, people take this to mean empathy for the User, and ensuring that the design is based on active, ongoing input from the User(s) (in this case, people with disabilities). In addition, however, we need to have "empathy" for the environment (understand the Earth's needs) so that we ensure our car design is eco-friendly.

The Compassion Games call people to exercise their compassion muscles in all 3 dimensions. The Games provide a unifying infrastructure to support and promote compassionate action. With the stories shared and benchmark measures reported on the Compassion Report Map, people set their own goals and hold themselves accountable to strengthen their compassionate action over time. With funding, the Games can expand to include other optional/more-customized evaluation measures on the Map and can also expand connectivity between participants.

It would be great to be able to delve into more in-depth evaluation of the many varied compassionate actions represented on the Compassion Report Map or gather more information on the evaluations that teams have conducted themselves. This is a valuable suggestion for future enhancement!

Thank you!!

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Dear Compassion Games, these games are definitely the most impactful way to impact peace, prosperity and the planet in a radical new way. It combines service, technology, compassion and inspiration to reach millions in a new simple way. It is the best idea I have seen on the planet thus far and has the potential to grow to affect billions.
My contribution in terms of suggestions to increase the impact of this idea would be the following:
1. For those wanting to play in countries that lack access to technology, wifi, electricty and computers, what options are available for them? Often, this segment gets "left behind" in the new technologically accessible world. What ideas could be sparked to include them more and thus increase the numbers by millions.
2. Target the department heads, bosses, principles of schools etc so that all teachers in Sarah's school would be playing instead of just Sarah. THis would increase the impact a thousandfold and make it more locally relevant and fun. This could include encouraging Sarah to take it to her organization to have all classes play or sending the information out via email to all principles of all schools across North America
3. Target businesses and maybe have an information packet or email sent to many large businesses to encourage their departments to play "against" one another. Distill it into a simple form that businesses can do in one day of compassionate action per year to and commit to that day every year. Businesses would love this if it was simple. Have a staff member available to mentor them through the process the first year as they set it into their corporate culture.
4. Make the reporting more than online. Make relationships with local press and encourage the organizers to report it to press and other media to increase the awareness and inspiration. Perhaps provide simple tools like a press release template or ideas on how to spread this via their social media/marketing channels.

Good luck on continuing to spread this message far and wide and changing our world to a planet that thrives on coopetition!

Photo of Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH
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Hello Pearl Gottschalk . Thank you for your valuable feedback. These are fantastic ideas about how to grow the Compassion Games! The Compassion Games online platform is just one visible attribute of the Games. As the Founder of Compassionate Austin and one who is always working on ways to engage people in the Games at the grassroots as well as international levels, I know that the Compassion Games reach far beyond the technology. The very act of sharing the Games concept with people starts conversations and collaborations that did not exist before. Often I work to support and encourage local organizations, schools, libraries, businesses, etc. to participate in the Games. Sometimes, I serve as a local point of contact for the Games and I help gather data from teams and report it on the Compassion Report Map. So, the compassionate action part of the Games does not depend on technology. The Games inspire and, in turn, demonstrate the real day-to-day hands-on compassionate action taking place throughout the world. As we grow the Cities League for the Games we will develop and strengthen connection hubs for the Games that can reach out and engage people via multiple means throughout communities and regions (most often through face-to-face personal contact instead of relying on the Internet or technology). This process of outreach and connection will build and strengthen new pathways of collaboration and relationships between compassionate action efforts- all via real-world contact. The "City Hubs" can then act as a resource to access the Compassion Report Map and report for those lacking technology access.

A person from the OpenIDEO Nairobi Chapter has shared this comment: "... For adults that like to game or can be inspired to do so, some rural areas have minimal internet access. Setting up of off line gaming methods like community computer labs that require little power usage with provision of SD cards could help.
In Kenya, the government is in stages providing free laptops to all primary school children. Collaboration with this kind of programme would ensure installation of the game APP into the laptops that will be used both at school and at home to increase outreach..."

So, it is exciting to explore these and other possibilities. Thank you again for your input!!

Lesa

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Thank you Pearl for your thoughtful and spot on suggestions. I am confident that you will see us incorporating your suggestions to make sure that no one is left out from participating.

To All: Pearl is a member of the Compassion Games Team. Pearl was the Charitable Giving Ambassador for LUSH Cosmetics and awarded us a grant at the beginning of the Games. She has looked over hundreds (maybe thousands) of great ideas, so her endorsement comes with a great deal of depth of understanding and relevant insight. In addition to working at LUSH, one of the most socially responsible businesses I have ever dealt with, Pearl worked in Sierra Leone as a disability consultant. We are blessed with a truly awesome and diverse team of "committed compassionistas"! Reading their comments are so rewarding! You can see the distilled feedback coming together here http://bit.ly/2pCjFa6

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When it comes to partnership development, I am reminded of the Fifth City Concept that was tried in Chicago as a community organizing strategy. You map out a geographic area, a triangle, within the city and you work to make certain that you have direct contact with all organizations, people and religious groups within that area and you do massive organizing and action planning at the grass roots level. When you feel you have a sustainable model you flip the triangle on the map and repeat your organizing.

Consider that the Compassion Games works with the Charter to institute this as a change model. We could start with some of our hub areas: UK, Netherlands, Canada or work with some global campaigning cities and proceed to establish pilots. I would love to see this model used in a challenging area, i.e., Amman where there is a mixed neighborhood of Jordanians and Syria refugees--where refugees by law are not allowed to work and there is intense tension. Can the Games be an impetus to work together to help with sustainability--taking vacant land and organizing community gardens? The residents of the neighborhood would know the need and could determine the Game.

This is a long term venture, but I did see it work successfully, but I believe the reason it didn't continue is that it didn't have at the heart of the fifth city concept neighborhood people at the start and the ownership of the project was not extensive. The Games allow for more community engagement from the start. However, I think there would be a need for a concentrated effort to create a communication, assessment and evaluation system that was devised by the core group of community people.

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Thank you, Marilyn. This is a new approach (Fifth City Concept) that I am unfamiliar with and it sounds very promising. We have seen something similar happening with cities within a county that are challenging each other to independently as well as collectively rise within a region. For example, this is happening in Santa Clara County (Silicon Valley) as the county has affirmed the Charter for Compassion and put the call out to all 15 cities in the county to do the same and participate in the Compassion Games.

With regards to refugees, we are thrilled that the Compassion Games are being played by a Play for Peace team in Greece that is made up of refugees from different war-torn countries. Unify is also building a hospital in a cave and using the Games to support the funding and delivery of "baby boxes"to refugees camps for expecting mothers.

Fortunately, there is no limit to our collective creativity to take on these challenges. Now more than ever we need to think and share with each other our genius. Thank you for bringing so much to the Games!

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I truly feel this project is simply brilliant! How does it get any better than this? Rather than competeing for personal gain, fame and fortune...the compassion games competes to see who can do the most positive change either locally or globally. I run an organization called the Cooperatist Movement and we teach that competition is akin to survival and cooperation is akin to thriving. Nothing illustrates this more than the compassion games as they coined the term Co-opertetion. Compassion games truly is something special and hopefully in time will be on the level of major sporting events like the Olympics and World Cup.
In terms of feed back, I would like to see more categories including individuals, religious organizations, cities (of multiple sizes), corporations, and maybe even countries going head to head. I could also see awards handed out to the winners picked by the public or honorary judges. Hopefully all the charities out there will love to compete with other charities and hopefully step up their team and even better have a way to inspire their organization to reach new heights of charity.
The real goal/challenge of the Compassion games is to able to scale it into a true global event and all that entails. Game on Compassion Games!

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Thank you, Scott. Your kind words are much appreciated. I think that what you are calling "categories" of teams are what we call "leagues." In the September Global Unity Compassion Games, we are rolling out the "Compassionate Cities League". We have another league for "Youth and Schools" and will soon have one for "Indigenous Peoples". You are correct, there is no limit to this kind of grouping of teams to enhance specialized play e.g. the Compassionate Cities league will include measures that show socio-economic indicators of shared prosperity within a city. We are excited about the partnering with the Cooperatist Movement and you personally. Thank you again!

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To tackle the significant problems of our time, we rely on the connected mesh of our global society. It is only together that we can make positive changes for future generations. This forward momentum starts with compassion, the way we treat one another, which ultimately connects our societies regardless of geographic boundaries or cultural differences. The compassion games is both directly and indirectly a catalyst for significant positive change. Game on!

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Compassion Games is an awesome organization supported by amazing generous people! The concept of coopetition rather than competition is what our world needs more of. Love truly wins! Jon and Sommer truly embody this, and we are all lucky to be blessed to know them.

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The Compassion Games is truly unique and extremely positive. Performing and capturing all types of compassionate activities is one of the most all inclusive and unique ways I can think of to help drive global peace and prosperity. Compassionate acts cross all boundaries such as heritage, race, religion, economic standing, or any other identifier you could choose. Compassionate acts don't need be in any categorical grouping. Literally any act of kindness or support can be included whether it involves individuals or groups, places or peoples. Whether they address natural ecosystems or communities within heavily populated areas of our world, compassionate behaviors can only have positive effects. The uniqueness of The Compassion Games concept is that it utilizes fun, team building, coopetitions, and challenges, without boundaries, to engage people across the globe and capture their compassion towards our world.

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I am 100% for The Compassion Games. These people are the real deal for making the world a better place...

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Thank you dear Sommer and Jon for the brilliant contribution of the Compassion Games, it is the energy of play that connects us at deeper level and beyond our differences, awakening us to a higher expression of who we are. You project is an effective, tangible and powerful tool of collective change and deserving to be launched at an even larger scale. You have touched millions and may many more be changed by these games. The time is now! Wishing you only the very best.

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This is such a wonderful initiative that is highly needed in our times! The Compassion Games 'Survival of the Kindest' and other terms like 'Call to Play' & 'Acts of Kindness' are very original reflections of the potential new paradigm in itself whereby the shift from competition to collaboration is central. It can certainly contribute to drive its mission forward.

The interlocked steps are very clear for the outcomes you envision including leveraging and follow-ups and it is very accessible and inviting in a meaningful, playful and tangible way. It is wonderful that you can come up with a new initiative or cater your existing initiative to the Compassion Games pursuit.

It seems to be a matter of refining communication and continued wider distribution. Hereby its important to cater this possibility also particularly to young people and underline the importance of intergenerational collaboration.

Thank you for making this happen and your meaningful contribution to the world dearest Jon and Sommer and team. You have been such an ambassador for the intrinsic meaning of compassion and what it can mean in our shifting age in its remembrance that we all long for. Jon, you are also a very exemplary mutual mentor and Elder for my generation.

Looking forward to see this wonderful initiative thrive into its next phase of its evolution now it stands on such solid grounds and continue to touch countless lives on our planet towards the future we are capable of.

In gratitude and much love,
Seren

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As being part of Compassion Games survival of the kindness, we are grateful and this has been given us opportunity to connect with other clubs from our own county which wasn't possible without Compassion Games and its initiatives. We are very encouraged and happy to organise events with the help of Play for Peace global Community and Compassion Games. On behalf of Indian club I would like to thank CG team and special thanks to Jon and Sommer for all your hard work and immediate actions, responses and updates of all upcoming events. It's all feel lively!
We had an opportunities to connect and work with the groups who are mostly neglected from society. With this initiatives we could reach to them and it's a great pleasure to work with these bunch of enthusiastic young people. Definitely all credit goes to Compassion Games and Play for Peace for creating such a wonderful and meaningful events where everybody can parcipate and find meanings in lives. Thanks for you constant support! ����

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Love Sommers enthusiasm and everything she does with Compassion games is a powerful thing...Jon and Sommer are both inspirational people I'm proud to know.

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Hey Jon, Sommer and the Compassion Games team. I'm such a huge fan and in some ways expanding the project might need to address some of the reasons I haven't been able to actively participate. One of the biggest challenges is modern life is super busy. Finding the time to do anything "big" is often overwhelming especially when it comes to trying to organize groups. (More on that later.) So I think one key might be making mini-challenges which could be done on just one day/any day of the bigger event. I can't help feeling that the events seem a bit overwhelming to people. You're dealing in an area of big changes in how people are currently socializing (or not) and to introduce them to the joy of being compassionate it might need simpler activities. Perhaps this could be something which could be introduced for the time between the big games. By creating a small actions which people can do at any time they can get involved without the overwhelming sensation of joining something spread out over several days.

As you know I ran into challenges when I tried to organize teams here so I think organizational tools are very helpful. Honestly, I found signing up and creating teams a little confusing. That may be my ignorance, but figuring out a way to allow people to join teams locally without knowing the organizer could be helpful. This will of course become easier as the games get more followers worldwide and people understand the joy and excitement of participating. Getting organizations, schools, businesses involved in different cities will also be a big part of spreading awareness and making team formation and action easier.

I recently completed a course in Gamification from the Wharton School of Economics on Coursera.org. I highly recommend it as I think there are quite a few things which you can do to drive excitement and engagement in terms of using game tools and being aware of some of the pitfalls of social impact gamification. For example breaking down leaderboards in many ways could help people get excited...giving them more opportunity to "leaders," and have views where you can see those around you both in terms of "points" and geography/type of project gives people more sense of the game...and opportunity to excel rather than just comparing themselves to top leaders or the big picture of the project.

There are real concerns about these types of projects (mine own included) and for me the two most important ones are: safety and competition.

On safety my own feeling is the world is facing real problems which are putting us all at risk. If we don't take the chance to show compassion and turn the social structure around our societies and planet could face dire consequences. I believe the answer is educating people, especially the young, on how to interact socially, especially with strangers and how to take steps to stay safe. We need to be honest there is no such thing as being 100% safe. We take risks all the time. One of the biggest...getting into motor vehicles...we do with little thought that our chances of death or disability are much higher than doing most other activities in the world. We need to take some risks if we're going to change the world...and the joy of helping others is truly worth it.

When I first heard about the compassion games I really liked the idea of Coopetitions, but I'm very interested in how that idea can be used in a way which reduces the competitive spirit the most. This might seem like a radical, or even insane idea, especially to those who feel our competitive spirits are primeval, natural, key to our survival, but I'm convinced it is the sense that we need to prove to others we are somehow "better" which is causing most of the world's problems. It may be that coopetition is a necessary stepping stone to a totally cooperative society, but I hope to be highly aware of this and see how to err on the side of cooperation. This is a real difficult issue and I've been struggling with it for the work we've been doing.

I wish you all the best. I really hope to find the time and energy to participate. If there's anything I can do to help please let me know. Go Compassion Games!!!

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Greg Acuna thank you so much for the support and thoughtful feedback on how we can improve. You brought up some points that I would like to speak to. The great thing about all 5 of the yearly coopetitions is that any person can simply report once or many times daily. There is no rule or expectation. It is up to the player. Looking at what you already do as a way to play can simplify your participation. Finding a group of people in your community also makes it really fun and meaningful. The Compassion Games is meant to compliment and activate inspiration for you and others.

In September we launch a new Compassionate Cities League along with an upgraded Compassion Report Map that will include advanced compassion metrics. This will address your concern about leaderboards for specific teams. It will enhance the experience of bridging the Global Community through more ways to share and celebrate. We see this Scoreboard on the Compassion Report Map as addressing your gamifying concern for the Compassion Games.

Yes, Greg it does take a great amount of risk to make change in this world. Let us be brave more and more together. Game On!

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Thank you Jon, you are a loving person. Of course we in Indonesia are eager to join and form a team. Let me know how we can join. I have many groups here that can be invited.

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Great! Sommer@CompassionGames.org is the person that can act as your coach and share with you what you need to put out the "call to play". While we can train to be more compassionate every day... the next "coopetition" is the Global Unity Compassion Games from 9/11 through the 9/21 the International Day of Peace http://compassiongames.org/global-unity-games/. Sommer can fill you in on the details. Why don't you send her your email address, you can copy me in too. I'm jon@compassiongames.org.

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Hi Eldy, I don't know if this was you, but there was an inspiring report from Indonesia on the Report Map today! Do you know the team Bridgeway Blue Jays? If this wasn't you this sure is a great example of the magic of OpenIDEO! Here is the report map, take a look in Indonesia! http://reports.compassiongames.org

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Hi eldy wullur this is Sommer from Compassion Games Team. I am honored to support you in organizing teams to play in the Global Unity Games in September. If you have any questions please email me. We just had a team from Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia participating in Earth Week April 22 through April 30th. I would gladly connect you to her. My email is sommer@compassiongames.org

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This growing global movement is unifying and uplifting the Human Family everywhere on Mother Earth with compassionate action and measurable results!

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Thank you Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr. for commenting and sharing your support of the Compassion Games! Your wisdom and guidance as our Chairperson since we started has been critical to our success. Your nearly fifty years of dedication to unifying the Human Family has brought great depth and meaning to the Games and to participating with Indigenous and non-indigenous communities all over the world. For those who don't know Hereditary Chief Phil Lane here is a link to a summary to learn more: http://www.fwii.net/page/brief-resume

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The Compassion Games exemplifies what it takes to create a more compassionate world. Rather than talk the talk, the games challenges individuals/groups to walk the walk with its messages of suggested acts of kindness, contemplating compassion, and living compassionately. The Compassion Report Map shows the positive taking place where other media outlets usually choose to report stories and images of hatred, anger, opposition, violence, and bloodshed. Participating in the Compassion Games helped me reflect on the little things that can be done toward the larger collective consciousness of peace and love. It has helped millions of people who are hungry, thirsty, in need of food/shelter, or a peaceful mind. It creates the opportunity for people to come together for the good, alleviating suffering worldwide. It amplifies love, unites humanity, and promotes life. Indeed, the Compassion Games is a blessing.

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Thank you so much for your support David Breaux. David is from Davis, California! David, you can have Davis join the Compassionate Cities League in the Global Unity Games in September. There are communities, cities, countries and continents rising all over the world claiming to be the most compassionate! Game on Davis, California. Here is where to sign up and learn more about Global Unity Games September 11 through September 21. http://compassiongames.org/global-unity-games/ . David has dedicated his life to bringing more awareness to compassion - you can learn more here https://www.gofundme.com/CompassionProject

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As an African Social Entrepreneur passionate about Africa of course.My focus is mainly on empowering the youth but also has been working on a cool solar project electrifying the most rural areas in Mali..Getting to know about the games of compassion makes me excited if only more Africans get to know and can play the game!We all know what the world thinks of us(Africa) but i kmow theres so much love to shown and shared, i belive within ourselves and playing such games can only review our true selves that can contribute to our communities.Give for example street kids who have not experienced love at all and turn to dealing and staying on the streets because thats the love they understand. If this game can be played i know for sure the amount of positive empact would be mind blowing!Thank You Brioné.Well done and keep holding the light up!

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Hi! Thank you so much for the comment. I'm also thrilled to report that there are many teams in Africa that participate and we want to get many more. One of the most remarkable teams is Play for Peace, they teach peace building to youth in conflict zones and have many teams in Africa as does URI (United Religions Initiative). We want to learn more about your solar project, one of the popular ways to play in the Compassion Games is to "Sun Up Our Sanctuaries". Communities have used the Games to
come together to implement cooperative solar projects! Take a look at the Teams in Africa http://reports.compassiongames.org Game on!

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Game On! Bring it Australia.

Photo of eldy wullur
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Hello Jon,
The game is synonymous with fun. But sometimes the game leads to things that are dangerous and fatal. The idea and about The Compassion Games, very interesting and amazing.
Of all the postings I read, all want improvement, prosperity, peace, expulsion of poverty and ignorance and many beautiful and good things. Compassion is not rejected everywhere in the world. And if almost all the inhabitants of the earth want a good and beautiful, then why we let our government produce horrible objects like missiles, tools of war in large quantities, does not make sense.
The one earth we inhabit together is filled with such things.
As taxpayers, we should unite to resist the misuse of our tax money. And suggested that our tax dollars be used to produce tools such as compassion games and so on including their development to the real world.

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Thank you, Eldy Wullur. It is a pleasure to meet you and thank you for your comment. We see compassion as the bridge that connects and unifies humanity. Uniting to stop buying weapons of war to invest and build a compassionate world seems like a game worth playing! We are eager to have more players and teams in Indonesia. We would welcome further conversation about how we can partner. Let us know if you're interested in following up on this.

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The Compassion Games have flipped the reason for playing games upside down. Think about games where you make up the rules, declare that your opponent is your partner and at the end everyone is a winner in the service of the other.

The Charter for Compassion's Compassionate cities movement, now present in 52 countries and in over 400 international communities, from small villages in Botswana and hamlets in Scotland, townships in the upper peninsula of Michigan to mega-cities of Karachi and New York, have relied on the Games to introduce the power of collaboration and bring about monumental change to righting the wrongs of society.

For nearly a decade the Games have been breaking new ground for individuals and teams to respond to big problems from infighting among those who are incarcerated, packing meals for the hungry, cleaning up water ways and being exemplar models of kindness. The Games are all about how we treat each other and how we care for each other. While collecting donations to help with a local cause may be present in some games, they are not paramount to the bottom line—getting to know and serve others—to experience that even the smallest acts form the structure for the possibility for a a peace-filled coexistence.

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Thank you Marilyn! Compassion is the bridge that connects and unifies humanity. The Charter for Compassion and the Compassionate Cities movement have nurtured and supported the Compassion Games since we started in 2012. Learning how we align and synchronize our activities and events is part of this new model of collaborating. Thank you for your leadership and for embracing and supporting the Games!!

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Hi Jon and Compassion Games Team!

Once again, thank you for the important work you are doing! As I am continuing my research on compassion as part of my PhD dissertation, I came across this ebook: Einstein Never Used Flashcards" that I thought you all (and your followers!) might be interested in... Indeed, if we want to create a more compassionate world, it needs to begin with the children...playing compassionately!

From the book's description:

"In Einstein Never Used Flashcards highly credentialed child psychologists, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Ph.D., and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Ph.D., with Diane Eyer, Ph.D., offer a compelling indictment of the growing trend toward accelerated learning. It's a message that stressed-out parents are craving to hear: Letting tots learn through play is not only okay-it's better than drilling academics!

Drawing on overwhelming scientific evidence from their own studies and the collective research results of child development experts, and addressing the key areas of development-math, reading, verbal communication, science, self-awareness, and social skills-the authors explain the process of learning from a child's point of view. They then offer parents 40 age-appropriate games for creative play. These simple, fun--yet powerful exercises work as well or better than expensive high-tech gadgets to teach a child what his ever-active, playful mind is craving to learn."


https://books.google.com/books?id=9kP1XjUEa-IC&dq=the+need+for+play+and+compassion&lr=&source=gbs_navlinks_s

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Yes! "Let my learning be my playing and my playing be my learning." This is one of the most important insights about how we go beyond our "comfort zones" into our "stretch zones". If we're "just playing" it seems to be OK to try something new, to go beyond that which is familiar. We've learned with the Games that playing let's us go beyond what we are used to and reflecting upon what we've learned helps us take what we've experienced and apply it outside of the game and into the real world. The bottom line is we have much to learn about how we learn. Thank you so much, Lisa. Game on!

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I love this idea! Having spent more than 20 years in international mediation and peace making, Compassion Games strikes me as a tool to help end conflict--why compete to build arms and weapons when most people on the ground want to live peacefully? Coopetitions just might be a significant player in shifting consciousness from fear and heart to care and compassion.

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Thanks, Lisa. Building Bridges that connect Peace, Prosperity and the Planet is the focus of this challenge and we think a great fit with the Compassion Games. One of our strongest Teams that play in the Games is Play for Peace. They teach peacebuilding through "cooperative play" in conflict zones around the world. They are in more than 20 countries and have 30 teams in the upcoming Earth Week Coopetition with one that is made up of refugees from different war-torn countries. Here is a short video of their Executive Director, Sarah Gough talking about their partnership with the Compassion Games. She is really quite brilliant! https://youtu.be/8XWO-nb_3Ko

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Hi Jon! Thanks for replying! I FINALLY got to watch Sarah Gough's video. Really exciting! And so needed... Thank you for being, and for creating an opportunity, for people to connect in this way, have fun, and play! Right on!

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The following addendum to her previous comment is written and submitted by:
Angelica Volterra, MD
Palo Alto, California
(As before, she has given me permission to post this comment addendum on her behalf.)

"As the Compassion Games Challenge proposal notes, 'Scientific research abounds in revealing the intrinsic value of compassion in supporting civil society as well as individual people to flourish.' Also, the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE - Stanford University) website says, 'His Holiness the Dalai Lama has said that the problems of the world – social, economic, environmental, and so on – are best understood and viewed through the lens of compassion.' Mahatma Gandhi said that 'Compassion is a muscle that gets stronger with use.'

Scientific research confirms the value – and the possibility - of cultivating compassion. Compassion training has enormous global social and political significance and relevance. His Eminence and other prominent individuals believe that compassion and compassionate action can help us to face and to resolve complex global challenges. The Compassion Games create a platform that allows individuals and communities across the globe – even in resource-poor environments - to take action, to cultivate compassion while acting, and to study and measure outcomes. That is phenomenal!"

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The following comment is written and submitted by:
Angelica Volterra, MD
Palo Alto, California
(She has given permission and requested me to post the following comment on her behalf.)

“The Compassion Games seamlessly ally science and practice by engaging, inspiring, and empowering individuals and groups of individuals of all ages, cultures, and nations to have immediate, positive, creative, and profound impacts through acts of kindness, compassion, collaboration, and service while providing a platform for the cultivation, strengthening, and integration of capacities for peacefulness, happiness, resilience, and tranquility, and a framework for measuring and validating project impacts and outcomes. Congratulations on a very, very worthy, timely, and visionary project!"

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Thank you, Lesa! Please thank Dr. Volterra for us. We are so grateful for the encouragement and support.
Let her know that someone else has added a comment that is affirming her comment! Game on!!

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The Compassion Games is an amazing movement with goals that are tremendously beneficial and especially timely.  I fully agree with the well-stated comments from another supporter:
“The Compassion Games seamlessly ally science and practice by engaging, inspiring, and empowering individuals and groups of individuals of all ages, cultures, and nations to have immediate, positive, creative, and profound impacts through acts of kindness, compassion, collaboration, and service while providing a platform for the cultivation, strengthening, and integration of capacities for peacefulness, happiness, resilience, and tranquility, and a framework for measuring and validating project impacts and outcomes. Congratulations on a very, very worthy, timely, and visionary project!" 

 

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Hi Bill - thank you so much for adding a comment and affirming another contributors thoughts! We're really excited about the opportunity to expand and take the Games to scale. This will mean reaching many communities we've yet to engage with and improving the quality of life for the player volunteers and the people that are served within those communities. Our goal is to create throughout the year "viral participatory campaigns" that reach beyond our wildest imaginations to touch millions of people. We don't know how to do that yet, but we see OpenIDEO as a way to reach people who are like-minded and committed to work and play together so everyone wins! We look forward to learning from this learning community!

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This made me think of the Olympic Games. The global community rallies around the Olympics every 4 years so why not rally around the Compassion Games every year?

Photo of Jon Ramer
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Exactly! Why not celebrate our social and emotional strengths?

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Is the tagline - "survival of the kindest" - always included? "Olympics of the heart" speaks to me. Also, "increasing and supporting caring communities." It's easy to get hung up in semantics, yet how you present the concept is also important to growing it. "Games" is a word that is open to many interpretations - both good and bad. "Olympics", on the other hand, generally has a more standard and positive interpretation. I suggest playing around with the concept - the Worldwide Kindness Olympics. Great work!!!

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What a wonderful concept in this time of uncertainty!! Please figure out a way to explain it more simply and in fewer words!!! So more people will support and join in!

Photo of Jon Ramer
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Thank you, Linda. We appreciate you signing in and leaving us this comment. We want to make it easy to understand and to join in. Communicating something "radically new" is a challenge. We're in this challenge to learn, so let's see what we can learn from your experience.

For some, looking at the Compassion Report Map let's one quickly see the output, outcomes and impact that the players in the games are having http://reports.compassiongames.org

We've described the Compassion Games as:
- "the antidote to the Hunger Games"
- "The olympics of the heart!"
- "A way to make our communities safer, kinder, more just and better places to live, work, play, and serve."

What worked for you? What made it confusing to you? What made it clearer? Any attempts to introduce the Compassion Games in fewer words are greatly valued.... once people play it is very clear and inspiring to many players! Any suggestions are welcomed? Game on!

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When we learn more about compassion, we realize that there is such a thing as compassion fatigue. The Compassion Games re-charge us and sustain us to champion the collaborations and efforts we must continuously generate to create a better world. Research shows the importance of building up compassion satisfaction as a rejuvenating force. The Compassion Games are a celebration of compassionate action (as we care for others, ourselves, and the Earth). The celebration and cooperative sharing platform energize and inspire us to stay in the game. We experience the exuberance of others, we honor our actions, we gain compassion satisfaction, and thus, we are encouraged to strive together in continuous pursuit of peace, prosperity, and sustainability of the planet. What an incredible opportunity for OpenIDEO to support and motivate collaborative compassionate action that is so vital for our world.

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Hi Jon!

Interesting work! Is this your website - http://compassiongames.org/?

When were you established and registered (month and year)?

Over the next 3 years which specific games bridge two or more of peace, planet, and prosperity? How much in funding are you requesting?

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Thank you, Kate. Yes, that is our website http://compassiongames.org the video we made for this challenge is also specific about how we bridge peace, prosperity, and planet, just in case you didn't see it here's a link https://youtu.be/qDw5Mke9FSU The theme for the 2017 Global Unity Games from 9/11 through 9/21 is "Building Bridges" http://compassiongames.org/global-unity-games/ This seems like a perfect fit (we named it before the challenge!). The history of the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest is also in the video but we started the International Campaign for Compassionate Cities in 2010. We started the Compassion Games as part of Compassionate Seattle in 2012 and registered as an independent non-profit in January 2014. We are planning to launch the 2017 Global Unity Games at the Points of Light ServiceUnites conference in Seattle in June and kick-off the Games in the Netherlands in September and pass the Compassion Torch during this time in the UK. Aren't you in the UK? Perhaps we can partner around this. Do you have a solution in the challenge? Thanks for your comments.

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Hi Jon!

Thank you for getting back to me. Yes, I am in the UK but I am one of the Community Guides for the challenge so my role is to read the ideas, help them go and connect people together. Are there any types of organisations or ideas you would like to be connected to? Are there specific regions and countries you would like to expand into?

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Hi Kate -- Got it! The theme for the September Global Unity Games is "Building Bridges" so there is such a good fit. We think that many of the solutions put forward in this challenge would benefit from participating in the Global Unity Compassion Games "coopetition". I have read and commented on many that are very complimentary, but there are so many! The way the Players and Partners come together to participate lends itself well to multi-stakeholder collaboration. We are planning to translate the site into multiple languages and can use help with that. We don't have teams in China or Russia yet. Our goal is to launch a movement like the "Olympic Games" but with the focus on our social and emotional abilities. We are thrilled about the opportunity to evolve what we have built so far and genuinely excited by OpenIDEO. Thank you for being a guide, we look forward to the guidance!

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I'm a long-time player, mentor, and supporter of the Compassion Games. I'm amazed and moved by my experience with how rewarding and effective this "friendly coopetition" platform is to create both personal and group transformation in any culture. The Games appeals to anyone at any social scale: kids doing random acts of kindness, prisons practicing nonviolence, cities and corporations providing community services. It's a brilliant blend of head, heart, and hands! It calls to the heart to move people and organizations to kind action in many different team leagues (schools, indigenous, women & girls, etc) and then uses a state-of-the-art map feedback system which showcases stories and gathers metrics. It's a tested tool to build bridges across business, government, nonprofits, and citizens in communities by promoting projects that are already happening and catalyzing new ones. The Games has extensive network partners and is at a tipping point for rapid growth with new strategies like relays and expanding leagues. It's a crucial time in the world to be building together with compassion across our differences. Thanks for the inspiration and support, openideo!

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This work is a great compliment to the Compassionate Cities movement.  Cities like to compete.  Creating a co-opetition to help cities compete around love and compassion is a brillant "hack" of everyday competition. It is solving our issues on a different level of thinking.  Co-host, Compassionate Louisville.

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Thank you, Tom. The Compassionate Cities movement was the starting point for building "four-way" partnerships in communities: bottom-up, top-down, outside-in, and all starting from the inside-out! We were inspired to respond to the "Compassion Challenge" especially when you told us that Louisville was so compassionate that you'd come out to Seattle to help us beat you! Thank you for the love and support!

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You can see the Compassion Report Map in action by watching this short video intended to help players understand and use the Map. All our results are based upon what is shared on the Compassion Report Map. Game on! https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YJT5yu6vri8
You can access the map here http://reports.compassiongames.org

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My mother is a therapist and what she has found most effective with her clients is teaching through games is best. Kids usually excercise and practice their skills and coping skills without paying attention to them that then they can transffer to real life scenarions!

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This is the real deal. I'm astounded and thrilled by The Compassion Games International's ability to take something as often etherial-sounding as "compassion" and turn it into a fun and empowering movement of positive action, with a structure that logs the tangible impact of its thousands of worldwide participants. Jon and Sommer are the heart and soulfire of this org, working tirelessly, humbly, with utmost integrity, on behalf of our Earth and Relatives. Giving to support them is a gift in itself, bringing joy by connection with such loving, compassionate people.

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Compassionate DFW is a grassroots organization that promotes compassion and compassionate action by encouraging individuals and community organizations from all sectors (arts, business, education, environment, healthcare, interfaith/religion/and spiritual, peace, restorative justice, science and technology, social justice, social service, and women and girls) to affirm the Charter for Compassion and commit to intentional compassionate action using the Golden Rule as guiding principle. The various annual Compassion Games provide practical, tangible, intentional ways to express this core value, bringing people of all ethnic, cultural, and religious traditions together for common community purposes, fostering respective, responsible, cooperative, and engaging relationships, which are enduring. The games truly provide themes and avenues for action making the "noun" compassion into a "verb." GAME ON!! :)

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Yes! Compassionate DFW (Dallas/Fort Worth) is a fierce team of "compassionistas"... it will take a heartfelt team to take them on! This multi-stakeholder team is an example of how the Games works at the intersection of overlapping sectors and fosters collaboration between existing solutions. Remember: no one can lose the Compassion Games and the more people play, the more people win!

Take a look on the Compassion Report Map in the DFW area. You can read their reports...I remember them feeding over 20,000 hungry kids in a recent Coopetition! Game on!!
http://reports.compassiongames.org

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The Compassion Games is an idea whose time has come; there is nothing so powerful as a technology introduced on a planet in the precise moment it is ready for it. I remember as a child wondering why the grownups weren't doing something to end fighting and war as a viable option in disputes and I vowed when I was a grownup "I would DO something!" So, I've been an activist since the sixties as well as an Officer in the Sister Cities movement partnering under the START Treaty with "enemies" to decommission WMDs. I was born with a vision of a better world-- I believe we all are and we all long for it. I think we forget that our bones know the blueprint.

Working and waiting for change made me so terribly weary especially with the turn in current political and social climates. But now the Compassion Games have caught on, are growing and have become truly global! Someday it will be unfashionable NOT to play! Thank you Jon and Sommer and Mayor Fischer for growing the antidote to conflict.

Now we can push forward in cooperation and life enhancement in human affairs instead of only pushing against the worn out ways that don't serve us or support life anymore. We have the means now, through technology and advanced communication and social networks, to create a critical mass of visionaries who can re-remember that once vivid vision we carry inside of a better world. The Compassion Games have the potential to completely construct a new architecture of humanity in between the old ways instead of having to destroy and start over. It's a much better option. Where else can we play together to construct a compassionate human narrative for our world and we, as architects, can have fun as we interlock the scaffolding?

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Wow, Barbara! Thank you so much for laying it out so clearly. I love the idea of "re-remembering that once vivid vision" and how our playing can be our learning as we awaken and remember that we are one human family and are all in this together. Not unlike the Olympic movement I can imagine a Compassion Games movement focused on recognizing and celebrating our "social and emotional" strengths and capabilities as Individuals and Teams. You are clearly a Champion of Compassion!

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Team

Thanks to the Compassion Games, our community building organization was finally able to reach a segment of our county to engage in an expression of interfaith understanding and reconciliation we otherwise were not reaching with dialogue and other assorted events for nearly 10 years. Through community service we were able to melt barriers and bring people across different faith traditions together in the same room (or park/beach) to find their common value of compassion and altruism. Through the added dynamic of "coopetition" they had a great time challenging one another in a new and productive way that ultimately engaged more volunteers, more hours spent serving, more dollars raised, and more people served. It was that creative tension that created a way to play together, which replaced fear and distrust. By reporting and reflecting to the Compassion Map, we could then see the depth of the impact we were having.

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Thank you, Sande! You bring so much to the Compassion Games, demonstrating the power that communities have to come together in surprising and inspiring ways. Thanks to you we met Lia Mandelbaum who brought the Compassion Games into the prisons in California where they played eleven days without a single incident of violence. They have now played for years! Here's the story we wrote about it that includes a link to Lia's doctoral dissertation on the Compassion Games in prison. http://compassiongames.org/ms-lia-mandelbaum-and-a-compassionate-uprising/ Thank you for your continued and dedicated support!

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What a fascinating idea... I could 100% see this scaling into an event that takes a more prominent spotlight nationally and internationally. The tools you're working with (such as the mapping) would no doubt be useful for numerous social/cultural/environmental transformation efforts. Would be amazing to see more people using that mapping to see intersectionality between movements, and to help unify them in some way!

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Thanks, Joey. Yes the Compassion Report Map
makes visible and elevates compassion in action. Players can post anonymously. It shows what we're capable of as a community and global team. Here's a link http://reports.compassiongames.org Everyone is welcome to use and share the Compassion Report Map.

Photo of An Old Friend
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Awesome! I love your work and it becomes more interesting because it works to all ages.

Photo of Jon Ramer
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Yes! We have players and teams from three year olds to ninety year olds!

Photo of Jon Ramer
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Thanks, Lesa. I'm glad you liked the video. It does show specific examples of players and teams building bridges to Peace (e.g. Play for Peace teaching peace building in conflict zones), Prosperity (Mayor's around the world embracing "Compassion as Effective Public Policy"), and the Planet (Team Decarbonize synthesizing 100,000 youth recommendations on climate change and the impact on Indigenous communities). Yes, Sommer! Many of the other solutions proposed would naturally fit as Teams in the Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest! Great idea!

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Just want to add: What an awesome Compassion Games video "Idea Summary"!!! Power-packed!

Photo of Lesa R. Walker MD, MPH
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Compassion is the ultimate bridge. The Compassion Games engage everyone, in accordance with their own place and culture, in taking action to care for others, self, and the Earth! Through compassionate action and sharing and measuring our impact, we unify and collectively meets needs and find solutions to local and global issues. This idea is essential to our future. We must do everything we can to lend our support to the growth and expansion of the Compassion Games. Science documents the benefits of compassion skills in terms of personal and community well-being. This is the most creative idea and proposal of our time!

Photo of Sommer Albertsen
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The world needs this! So many of the contestants for this challenge have incredible ideas. I can see many of them growing and being prosperous through Compassion Games. This is such an incredible bridge to so many needs globally. Compassion is core to all new solutions. This is really for everyone.