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Who are the individuals frequently responsible for human rights violations?

In countries where it's clear that police officers and government officials are performing illegal arrests & detentions, tracking these individuals is arguably as important as tracking the victims themselves.

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Written by DeletedUser

In countries where it's clear that police officers and government officials are performing illegal arrests & detentions, tracking these individuals is arguably as important as tracking the victims themselves. The vast majority of victims of unlawful detentions will be caught off-guard, making it difficult to prepare each of them. However, the detainers themselves are likely repeat offenders if not part of a systematic program of unlawful detentions. Shedding light on who these people are and the details of their whereabouts may be a critical piece of the social and political pressure needed to keep their illegal actions in check.


When it comes to unlawful detention it seems there are two categories of countries that commit offenses: those that maintain an official stance against it, and those that incorporate it to some degree in their method of government, whether or not acknowledged.


Technologies that would likely work in the former type of country for monitoring the whereabouts of officials could be implemented from the top down:


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-558597/Met-Police-officers-microchipped-brass-Big-Brother-style-tracking-scheme.html


http://www.geekologie.com/2011/08/finally-a-decent-police-officertracking.php


Much more difficult, of course, is devising a strategy for monitoring these officials in countries that do not denounce unlawful detention. However, there are still technologies that could begin to illuminate places, vehicles, and individuals that are frequently a part of unlawful detentions:


http://www.trackersystems.net/Feature-Stories/geo-fences-help-identify-illegal-activity.html

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Photo of Tayfun Uslu

This is really great John. I really like the idea because I have been always thinking how to track the potential victims and not the potential perpetrators.

The major issue was the vast scale of potential victims. Well there are many of them while there are fewer officers, so it is LOT easier to follow the officers.

If we can track the officers, we will now where they are and they will know that the Big Brothers know where they are! Not only they will act cautiously, they also cannot close their eyes when someone else behaves in certain way because we will know that they were there.

Another point is the beauty of not tracking individuals. Sure, we are proposing surveillance for each individual for the sake of unlawful detention but how will we know that such surveillance won't be used for something else in the future. In the case of tracking of officers, that could be part of the job, when one leaves the job, tracking is over.

One more comment from a technical perspective: besides GPS (which doesn't work well within buildings) there are other tracking tools, which are actually used in shopping, that could tell where the people have been.

Thanks John again for the great inspiration.

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DeletedUser

Thanks for the support Tayfun! I've just put a little more structure around the idea with this post: http://www.openideo.com/open/amnesty/concepting/the-anti-solcial-network/