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Postharvest Training and Service Center

An initiative to build postharvest center(s) with training programs and processing facilities to help small-scale farmers reduce food waste.

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce

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EXPLAIN YOUR IDEA

Post harvest food loss is one of the largest contributing factors to food insecurity and hence poverty in developing countries, directly impacting lives of millions of poor, smallholder farming families (WFP 2015). Due to poor post harvest handling and storage practices at the household level, within the first three months after harvest, farmers lose up to 40 percent of their harvest. Yet in Uganda, the loss is at 45% with perishable foods being most affected mainly due to poor handling from farm to the market We have come up with an idea to train and equip farmers and actors in the produce value chain with best post-harvest practices and techniques. We want to set up a training and service center that shall coordinate different training and a series of demonstration activities. The first of its kind in Uganda, the center will offer special training on post harvest handling practices/technologies of all crops to 500 farmers by end of 2018. For instance on practices like right harvest time, maturity indicators, storage, solar drying, cooling, sorting and grading. It will showcase and provide post harvest technologies like Zero Energy coolers, coolbot, solar dehydrators, Insulated cool boxes and tools such as plastic crates, Liners, display cases, temperature probes, calipers, size and grading rings. Lastly it will process and handle produce and act as a marketing agency for farmers produce, aware of the fact that low market value is explained by poor handling of harvests.

WHO BENEFITS?

1. The smallholder farmers. These are our major point of focus; they will be trained in best PH handling practices and technologies, the center shall connect them to better markets and also absorb some of their produce by processing it. 2. The middlemen and traders, they will be trained in best PH handling practices 3. The final consumer, they will receive value for their money by consuming safe and good quality food 4. The government and NGOs they will receive guidance on PH handling

WHERE WILL YOUR IDEA BE IMPLEMENTED?

In Uganda, beginning in the central districts of the country and subsequently scaling up to the rest of the country

ARE YOU IMPLEMENTING IN AN ELIGIBLE COUNTRY?

  • Yes

EXPERTISE IN SECTOR

  • I’ve worked in a sector related to my idea for over a year

EXPERIENCE IN IMPLEMENTATION COUNTRY(IES)

  • Yes, for more than one year.

TELL US MORE ABOUT YOU!

We are an organization called Africa Reach out Foundation registered in Uganda, focused to solving post harvest handling issues. Postharvest Education Foundation (PEF) is ready to avail us with training materials and advice. We are looking for a collaborator to empower us make our dream a reality

IS THIS IDEA NEW FOR YOU OR YOUR ORGANIZATION?

This idea is not entirely new, its something that we have developed and been trying out at a very elementary level since 2014. We are not a big organization but a team of five members who have been talking to smallholder farmers in our locality about better post harvest handling technologies/practices. When we talk to farmers, traders, policy makers, they want to see and be trained about what we are talking about yet the establishment of training and a service center has never been done because we do not have an established footing but with a zeal to reduce food loss and waste resulting from poor post harvest handling. Post harvest loss is claiming 20 million metric tons of food each year in Sub Saharan Africa, valued at over US$4 billion (FAO 2011) yet it is not given attention it requires. About 800 million people around the world are trapped in a life of poverty and hunger (WFP post-harvest loss 2014-2015) therefore we want to give it due diligence it deserves by dedicating our time to this genuine cause.

HOW IS YOUR IDEA UNIQUE?

a) This center(s) will be the first of its kind in Uganda; there is no training and services center geared towards solving post harvest losses year round, we want to exist to bridge this gap so as there is a continuous flow of post-harvest handling information and service to the small holder farmers. Whereas prominent and large-scale farmers and traders have adopted up-to-date post harvest technologies, the rural smallholder farmers who constitute 90% of Uganda’s population are still languishing in produce loss, waste and abject poverty. b) Majority of the initiatives in place (both government and private), are committed to increasing production through improved farming methods/seeds. No efforts are in place to better handle the high yield that are being realized by these modern farming methods, if they exist, they are very scanty. c) Agricultural Colleges in Uganda hardly mention about Post harvest handling as a key aspect to having a successful farming enterprise, hence this creates a gap in the existing agricultural extension service. As team leader of the five member group, I am a well trained farmer (graduate) with specialized training in postharvest management by PEF USA

WHO WILL IMPLEMENT THIS IDEA?

We are a team of five members, all with Post Harvest handling knowledge and experience (one agricultural and post harvest consultant, two Social workers, Economist, and Teacher) ready to devote our time to implement the idea, together with support from the community agents who will be selected from the community by the small-holder farmers themselves. We are also assured of support from Postharvest Education Foundation of USA (PEF) that is willing to provide free training materials and advice

HOW HAS YOUR IDEA CHANGED BECAUSE OF BENEFICIARY FEEDBACK?

Whereas the farmers applauded the idea of Postharvest Training and services Center (PTSC) during beneficiary feedback, it changed in the following ways a) Improved on the way information should flow between the center and farmers. This phase brought in the concept of community agents who will be members of the local community elected by the smallholder farmers as coordinators. They will be trained to possess special knowledge on post harvest management of crops of their respective communities. The agent will be responsible for information sharing in the community, identify community training and services needs, schedule training and help in feedback b) We plan to eventually have regional centers across the country and have a formidable outreach team that will work together with community agents. This is because the target beneficiaries are low-income earners that can't afford traveling long distances to access knowledge and skills and as such prefer services in their vicinity. c) Marketing of the farmers' produce came out very strongly during our feedback and as such we have incorporated marketing strategy to help link farmers produce to the high-end-user consumers.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR UNANSWERED QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS IDEA?

Pre harvest deterioration of produce caused by pests and diseases in the gardens is not being addressed here; we are assuming that the current and previous production interventions have yielded results and farmers are aware of basic production practices.

WHY DO YOU THINK THE PROBLEM YOUR IDEA SOLVES FOR HASN'T BEEN SOLVED YET?

An ever increasing population has threatened food security in the country for decades, consequently, Uganda's main agricultural policy has been directed towards increased production to create enough food for the geometric population increase. Hence all government and private sector efforts have been focused to increasing productivity. Whereas a lot of efforts around the world to reduce post harvest loss have been done, access to these post harvest technologies and information by small scale farmers has remained a challenge. Consequently, post harvest handling of produce has not been given due attention, leading to high food loss hence low standard of living by the small holder farmers.

WHAT WOULD YOU ULTIMATELY LIKE TO ACHIEVE WITH THIS IDEA? WHAT IS YOUR NEXT STEP TO GET THERE?

We envisage a country free of food shortage, hunger and poverty. We want to help farmers obtain value for their produce through proper post-harvest handling practices so that they (farmers) able to obtain enough food to feed their household and yet remain with a sizable percentage for the market. Through offering training and market information we specifically focus on ensuring that Uganda's current 45% post-harvest food loss is reduced to 10% by 2021.

MEMBERS OF MY TEAM HAVE BEEN WORKING TOGETHER FOR:

  • More than a year

MY INTENDED BENEFICIARIES ARE:

  • Within in 500 km of where our team does most of its work

MY ORGANIZATION'S OPERATING BUDGET FOR 2015 WAS:

  • We didn't have an operating budget

Post harvest food loss is one of the largest contributing factors to food insecurity, under nutrition, hunger and hence poverty in developing countries, directly impacting the lives of millions of poor, smallholder farming families (WFP 2015).

Food loss and waste represents not only an obstacle to improving global food and nutrition security and feeding the estimated 870 million people still suffering from hunger and malnutrition, but also represents a gross misuse of the planet’s limited resources, while contributing to climate change (Save food initiative)

In many developing countries, due to inadequate handling and storage practices at the household level, within the first three months after harvest, farmers lose up to 40 percent of their harvest to insects, pests, mold, and moisture in pulses and cereals. yet in perishable foods, the percentage is 40% from farm to the market mainly due to poor packaging and transportation. According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Sub Saharan Africa alone loses 20 million metric tons of food each year, valued at over US$4 billion (2011).

Agricultural Colleges in Uganda hardly mention about Post harvest handling as a key aspect to having a successful farming enterprise, hence this creates a gap in the existing agricultural extension service. Three aspects are emphasized, feed the soil, take care of the plant and you will have great harvests to take to market. Yet post harvest handling has continued to challenge the produce market accounting up to over 45% of the marketable produce lost to poor post harvest handling right from the farm to the market not counting the minor damages. This percentage loss is alarming when compared to that of the world 40% and also given the fact that about 90% of Ugandans are smallholder farmers. The other effect includes the reduced quality of foods leading to less nutritional values and reduced shelf life. I have been a victim of this loss as a young graduate and it triggered my desire to enroll for a Post harvest training course. In the training, I was exposed to best post harvest handling practices –the causes and remedy to the possible food losses, which practices I have found lacking hence causing food loss and spoilage in Uganda. This is because farmers and other actors in the value chain do not know best post harvest practices. Big and imperforated containers are in use to transport perishables to the market, by the time the produce gets to the market, they are either rotten, bruised or crashed and ends up to the garbage piles in the cities/towns. Some produce that look physically fine have internal bruises resulting to reduced shelf life. Surprisingly, these wastes and spoilage are not borne by all the actors in the value chain; it’s the farmers that they transfer the burden to, by offering them very low prices for their produce. This is because the traders are not sure that the produce will get to the consumer in good marketable condition. Due to poor handling, many lucrative markets (supermarkets) have resorted to importing quality produce yet the same produce exists locally but only poorly handled and packaged. The resulting effects have been severe food shortages as losses reduce the disposable amount of food available to farmer and consumers. Should calamity occur, the small holder farmer are the most affected because they do not know how to handle and preserve their food beyond a season and yet are poor to afford buying food from the markets. To break this cycle of losses to the smallholder farmers, upon completion of post harvest training, I trained others and came up with a small-motivated team to train farmers and actors in the produce value chain. And at the same time, engage local authorities to come up with policies and laws that would address post harvest handling of produce. In all our efforts and deliberations with the actors, we have always been asked to showcase our ideology; as a result, we came up with the idea of creating a Post harvest training and services center. This will offer training and advice to all stakeholders in the produce value chain. This is because, meaningful post harvest efforts that can help farmers have improved income and standard of living, can only be achieved if we engage all actors in the produce value chain.

Attachments (1)

User experience map.pdf

This user experience map shows how the farmer incurs enormous loss of his sweet pepper by the time he gets to the market and his eventual connection to the Postharvest training and service center with his farming group. He is duly served by the center and he gets value for his produce in the market. He is assured of the market for his produce

40 comments

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Photo of William Lanier
Team

Does Postharvest training and service center have innovative grain storage platforms to grab student attention?
We think NeverIdlle Mobile Utility Grain Storage will grab student attention. 
<https://challenges.openideo.com/challenge/agricultural-innovation/ideas/storage-to-reverse-grain-postharvest-loss>

Photo of Lisa Kitinoja
Team

this idea seems to be for fresh fruits and vegetables

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

We have to note that fruits and vegetables are very susceptible to poor post harvest handling practices hence register the highest post harvest losses. These crops are seasonal and yet required in a big percentage in our daily diet. Improving their post harvest handling will not only increase income of farmers, will also improve quality of life of consumers. Therefore, whereas the center shall look at various crops, fruits and vegetables shall be given utmost attention to extend their shelf life.

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Yes, however some PHL is of wet, fruits and vegetables and meat (densely nutritious) and some is dry, high calorie grains. When properly dried and stored, high calorie grain feeds most of the human labor and animal power needed to grow, harvest and process densely nutritious food like fruits, vegetables and meat.
So how do we address the net benefit of nutrition with extended shelf life that requires eating afaltoxin?
William

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

There are a number of grain storage option that we have, but also worth noting here, grain losses do not only happen during storage, there are losses and waste happing right from the grain fields. Therefore a solution that shall reduce grain losses in my country starts right from the grain field; how it is harvested, carried to store, dried, threshed and then stored. Here in the country, an average smallholder farmer has approximately 2 acres of land on which to farm, and as such, any innovative strategies that targets such a farmer should be those that are affordable and easily adoptable. NeverIdlle Mobile Utility Grain Storage strategy looks good to me and can be incorporated at the center especially for the commercial grain farmers and the traders because smallholder farmers here rarely store their grain for future sale; whatever they do is hand to mouth.

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Muyomba,
Ok good to hear. Should we form a team and develop a experience map and lesson plan?
William

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Muyomba,
We have see potential in a basics up approach to better storage practices applying calibrated hand held moisture meters.
Maybe the Jobs for Youth to reverse PHL would make a good lesson plan that is easy for a micro-micro job. Give us your comments about <https://challenges.openideo.com/goto/challenge/agricultural-innovation/jobs-for-youth-to-reverse-cereal-grain-postharvest-loss>
Regards,
William

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Hello Muyomba Wilberforce,
William (NeverIdle) hopes you are doing well and wish to invite you to the "1st All African Postharvest Congress and Exhibition (March 28 - 31) Nairobi"
<http://africa-postharvestconference.uonbi.ac.ke/>. We hope to meet and discuss more about Moisture meters and testing to Reverse Grain Postharvest Loss."
Regards,
William

Photo of Bruce
Team

I work with a University, we have agriculture as a module, how can we partner with you because as i read through your idea it seems this can be a great opportunity for us and our students to get more skills in post harvest handling.
Two, how long can the training take because we have so many classes for our students, we need to know so that we can see how we can incorporate it into our time table that is if you agree to partner with us. Thanx.
Bruce:

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Hi Bruce,
I am glad that you have shown interest to partner with us, maybe I would like to know where the University is located, if it is within East Africa, then that can be worked out pretty easily. This can be done in two ways, have a post harvest handling seminar which can combine all the classes together for something like a week and then we subsequently train some of your staff to carry on the training. Please contact me on (wmuyomba@gmail.com) for more details

Wilber

Photo of Jonathan
Team

Before Post harvest training i have realized many local farmers are lacking brilliant ideas to do much  input into their produce but  with enough training and impacting knowledge into their farming life i think they should be better to compete in this fast growing African economy. So all i can say is more training and making more agricultural seminars in the villages would be a great idea. Thanx  to post harvest. 

Photo of Olivia
Team

Hi Muyomba, 

Similar question to the one posed below, it would be key to consider what the business/ ownership models would be for sustainability. 

Thanks, 

Olivia

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Hi Olivia,

Thank you for the contribution, could you please scroll down, you will find the answers to sustainability concern you have raised here.

Kind regards,

Wilber 

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Muyomba, 

Below are some feedback from our experts and Amplify team. Looking forward to your responses!

-How might you reach small-holder farmers in the field — for those that may not have time to come to the training center. Are there any plans to deepen engagement and training with farmers on site by going to where they are?

-How will the training center finance itself? What will be provided and at what value? How will scale-up be achieved?

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Hi Chioma Ume,
Thank you for the questions, our team is putting together response to these questions, will respond soon.

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Muyomba - sounds great, thank you! 

Photo of Robert Odoi
Team

Hi Chioma Ume

-How might you reach small-holder farmers in the field — for those that may not have time to come to the training center. Are there any plans to deepen engagement and training with farmers on site by going to where they are?

We are to form structures right from the village level parish, County and sub county, Small Scale Farmers (SSF) are identified at district level, trained as (Training of Trainers) ToT and equipped with training skills at a District level. Each Trainer goes back to the field to train others on site as we monitor and guide them during our Bi-Weekly visits to the villages.


How will the training center finance itself? What will be provided and at what value? How will scale-up be achieved?

The center is to Seek for Local support from Government programs to Stock the PTSC initially. thereafter selling affordable equipment and Materials to SSF as a sustainability strategy. Educational Materials, packaging, Transportation, sorting and sizing rings will be made from local materials and lots of trainings at the center for the locals.

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Robert,

Thanks for these responses! Taking a look at the feedback you received from beneficiaries, I wonder - is a centre the best way to provide the services that they are most interested in receiving? What makes you think that a centre is better than a more traditional agricultural extension centre? 

Also, do you guys have a space for the centre already, or is that something that you are hoping to build?
 

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Thanks! 

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Hi Chioma Ume, please receive these responses below in line with the questions that you asked earlier,

-How might you reach small-holder farmers in the field — for those that may not have time to come to the training center?

Even though farmers may have the time to come to the center, some may not have the resources to enable them travel to the center. Therefore we plan to have outreach training in the communities to equip and serve Small scale farmers (SSF) better. The community agents will be responsible for information sharing in the community, identify community training and services needs, schedule training and help in feedback.

Are there any plans to deepen engagement and training with farmers on site by going to where they are?

We plan to have farmers involved, they already suggested to have community agents from amongst themselves during beneficiary feedback. We plan to have a post-harvest needs assessment of each community together with the farmers and our engagement will be tailor made to solve their post-harvest needs. This so because communities may not grow the same crop and so may not have similar post harvest handling needs. Based on the assessment, technologies, tools and equipment necessary for post-harvest handling  will be availed to them. To have them more involved, technologies which can be made using local materials, will be built together with the farmers e.g ZECC and some training done in their own fields


-How will the training center finance itself?

Besides the center having a training section which is entirely free to small scale farmers (SSF), the center shall have a services section which shall offer services to farmers and other clients at a cost to help sustain the center;
1. We shall have a processing unit which shall add value to the produce and sell to high premium markets, this shall be a secondary outlet to act as off-taker of the supply and provide another blanket of security to small-scale farmers and yet help sustain the center
2. There shall be a tools and equipment unit, we shall purchase these items in bulk and retail them to clients at a minimal profit.
3. There shall also be a cooling, solar drying, treatment, packaging, sorting and grading unit to offer services at an affordable fee.

What will be provided and at what value?

Post-harvest training to small holder farmers shall entirely be free, the rest of the services shall have a fair charge and vary while considering that Small Scale Farmers are low income earners and expensive technologies may not easily be adopted.

How will scale-up be achieved?

Once small holder farmers in target area possess desirable post-harvest knowledge and skills and also achieve post-harvest loss reduction to less than 10%, these shall be launched but monitored periodically especially through the community agent. Consequently, another community shall be taken up. 

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

is a center the best way to provide the services that they are most interested in receiving? What makes you think that a center is better than a more traditional agricultural extension center?

In Uganda we have no extension centers, it is extension services where an Agriculture officer is deployed at the sub county supposedly to offer agricultural extension to the farmers, with nothing to showcase to the farmers. This has been the case for more than 60 years yet the plight of small holder farmers has not changed much, farmers need to get involved, see and feel technologies. They want to see and determine whether it may work for them, not mere stories.
Whereas the center shall have an outreach program to farmers, there are services that the PTSC shall offer to sustain its self so as to have the capacity to reach out to the farming communities across the country as opposed to the agricultural extension services which are continually funded by the government, it shall not be the case with PTSC, this will be a self-sustaining center.

The center shall absorb some produce in its processing unit, this shall be a secondary outlet to act as off-taker of the supply and provide another blanket of security to small-scale farmers and yet help sustain the center. Small scale farmers practice rain fed agriculture, they plant and harvest at the same time resulting into price drop, therefore processing and increasing shelf life shall decongest the market, all these are made possible at the center.

The center shall also connect farmers that handle their produce well to high premium markets. Because of the poor handling of the produce by all the actors in the value chain in Uganda, the upper class restaurants, hotels and shopping centers (supermarkets) resorted to importing from other countries who appropriately handle their produce (Kenya, South Africa). The center shall work hard towards empowering small scale farmers to benefit from such high premium markets by offering quality produce to the market.

do you guys have a space for the center already, or is that something that you are hoping to build?

We are hoping to build it, we have land available.

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Thank you for the detailed and thoughtful responses, Muyomba! 

Photo of An Old Friend
Team

looks a great concept and - would work out  I specially like the  Postharvest Education Foundation of USA that has already given their support.
Your story is also very simple and good...

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Thanks Rohan

Photo of Bahenda Joseph
Team

Great idea Muyomba Wilberforce!
However,  I would suggest that you help the farmers to negociate prices, otherwise you may see many small-scale farmers certified from your centre, yet without access to the market.  on the other hand, your story is clear and so is the way you tell it.

Joseph

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Thanks Joseph for the observation,
This has been taken into consideration, connecting farmers to high end consumers/markets

Photo of Bahenda Joseph
Team

With pleasure!

Joseph

Photo of Godfrey Bukenya
Team

Many farmers especially those who produce fresh fruits and vegetables lose much of their produce due to lack of post harvest handling skills. this is the way to go.

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Thanks Godfrey, this is the only way to go as you have rightfully put it. It is painful to see the efforts of a farmer being put to waste within a twinkle of an eye between the farm and market due to poor handling practices. Wastes and spoilage at the end are borne by the farmers

Photo of bukie09@yahoo.com
Team

This is a great concept especially for fruits, vegetables and cut flowers loss prevention. I believe it will go long way in helping the farmer to reduce postharvest losses. Farmers will have access and be updated on a regular basis on the information and tools that they require. This method could be adopted in any part of the world.

Photo of An Old Friend
Team

Hi Muyomba,

the idea looks really good - I feel that it has a great potential to become a business.. Can look at demand and supply analysis to make a positive impact on the business

Photo of Chioma Ume
Team

Hi Muyomba,
I notice you haven't filled in the answers to the new phase questions yet. Friendly reminder to do so before the phase ends next week. Remember that the 'full description' field won't be visible to any of your readers.

Cheers!
Chioma

Photo of Angela Bukenya
Team

This really seems interesting. However, do you think of a possibility of picking the produce from the farmers, especially  deep in  villages where the inaccessible roads and long distances from the Service point may  discourage farmers for bringing their produce? Or must farmers deliver the produce themselves at the service centre?

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Thanks Angela, As you may have seen in our user experience map, the center carries out a needs assessment (training or service) the small-holder farmers may need and we shall promptly serve them. If the farmer(s) can bring their produce to the center for a service e.g sorting, grading, cooling, packaging etc, we shall be glad to serve them, if their challenge is transport we shall be glad to provide that so as their produce is not laid to waste in store/gardens

Photo of Jonathan
Team

Thanx wilber all well explained, one question how can the local peasant in the village be assured that all this will work because we have cases where the locals are too rigged to their traditional way of doing things

Photo of Jonathan
Team

Morning welberforce i like the idea of teaching the community low income peasants , its real a big challenge in our country farmers are less sensitized on how to add value to their produce because of lack of knowledge or lack of funds the use technology to boost up their produce. the idea i have seen in your user experience map is great i wish many people would look into it and get more enlightened.

"Question"
"i know technology is expensive in Africa but what systems or mechanism do you apply to reduce produce loss and adding value."?

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

Thanks Jonathan, the struggle has just started, how I wish we can join hands to make a difference in the lives of the small scale farmers. 
We have various tested ideas that are affordable by the local farmers which use either water or solar. There is a Zero Energy Cool Chamber which use only water to pre cool the fruits or vegetable especially after harvest, this is made from local materials accessible by the farmers. Then there are solar driers that can be used to add value just like you have said, we have plenty of sunshine, this is a free natural resource that we can use. Excess fruits or vegetables can be dried to extend shelf life or add value to the food, this affordable, the source of energy is free!!

Photo of Joseph Bukenya
Team

This looks a very great idea in Uganda given the fact that  fruits and vegatables form a sizable amount of our food stuff. In the longrun this idea has even capacity to reduce waste and garbage problems that challenge our urban markets and raise sanitation,health and operation costs that come with heavy gabarge collection bills. However a good number of rural farmers especially in the western part of Uganda are engaged in maize production and apparently they face a lot of food waste due to poor harvesting practices that see a lot of grain littered and spoilt right from the garden to the store. How can your idea embrace this category of farmers?

Photo of Muyomba Wilberforce
Team

You have nailed it right Joseph, there are lots of wastes in fruits and vegetables due to their perishability and fragile nature and pose a healthy risk. If you have taken note, diseases like diarrhea spread from market centers due to the compounding garbage in the markets.

About the littered maize, this is a problem that is across the whole country. Right from harvesting, maize should not be thrown in heaps in the fields as is the norm right now. There are simple bags that can be made from skirts, put straps on it to look like an apple bag, this can be used to harvest maize without splashing it in the field, then dried on tarpaulin sheets which can be folded and collect all the seeds, once dry, maize should not be beaten by sticks as is the norm, there is a range of threshing tools, beginning from manual to motorized ones depending on what the farmer can afford, these minimize losses and seed damage. Once dry, maize can be stored in air tight double layer bags or containers e.g silos/tanks not in woven plastic bags as is the practice. These are ideas that we envision to bring lasting solution to food loss and waste and hence increase disposable food to the small holder farmer for sale or consumption

Photo of William Lanier
Team

Does Postharvest training and service center have access to appropriate standards?
Calibrating moisture testers level the playing field when students enter the business market.
<https://challenges.openideo.com/goto/challenge/agricultural-innovation/jobs-for-youth-to-reverse-cereal-grain-postharvest-loss>


Regards,
William