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Human powered shredder

Urban farmers locally do not have access to appropriately designed equipment, they therefore struggle to reduce organic greens for compost

Photo of Peter Harrison
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EXPLAIN YOUR IDEA

Twenty five percent of Johannesburg's urban poor suffer from food insecurity (AFSUN 2012; FAO 2013; OXFAM 2014). This effectively means that between 3 and 10 times per month they go to bed hungry. Urban farming is thought to offer an alternative form of food supply that reduces 'food mile costs' and positions wholesome foods closer to consumers who struggle with an underdeveloped public transport system (Joubert 2015: 24). Research has also shown that the previously marginalised emergent farming sector remains without access to appropriate farming equipment (Centre for Development Studies 2009:37). The human powered shredder allows local urban farmers in Soweto / Johannesburg to reduce organic greens, kitchen waste and agricultural residue effectively and faster than by hand (participants, SS, MK, TG, EG, Soweto 2015/2016). This will enable farmers to improve their available urban soil characteristics. There could be multiple alternative uses for the shredder design, including juicing, power generation, grinding (food processing).

WHO BENEFITS?

The benefeciaries are members (some farmers are non-members) of the Region 'D' Farmers forum, a civil organisation of approximately 300 urban farmers working on 32 farm sites across Soweto / Johannesburg, South Africa.

WHERE WILL YOUR IDEA BE IMPLEMENTED?

South Africa, Gauteng province, Soweto / Johannesburg - Municipal Region 'D'

ARE YOU IMPLEMENTING IN AN ELIGIBLE COUNTRY?

  • Yes

EXPERTISE IN SECTOR

  • I’ve worked in a sector related to my idea for over a year

EXPERIENCE IN IMPLEMENTATION COUNTRY(IES)

  • Yes, for more than one year.

TELL US MORE ABOUT YOU!

My name is Peter Hugh Harrison, an Industrial designer currently completing my Masters degree in Industrial Design at the University of Johannesburg. With supervision from Angus Donald Campbell and Dr. Naude' Malan, of our research team Izindaba Zokudla (isizulu trans: Conversations about Food).

This version is shown adjacent a wheel barrow. It uses the rotation of a heavy flywheel attached to a shaft and cutters to reduce organic waste. Making smaller particulate in drier climates like Gauteng's, affords urban farmers the opportunity to produce compost and mulch more effectively in shorter periods of time. Using human power means that farmers are not reliant on expensive, sometimes unreliable electricity or fossil fuel inputs. The simple mechanical device is accessible, easily understood and can be locally manufactured by artisans (Schumacher 1973/2010: 62) using basic metal working tools. The design aims to be made available under a Creative Commons license agreement.

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Attachments (5)

DSCN1652.JPG

Angus Donald Campbell, demonstrating an appropriate technology water pump design to interested local farmers during an Izindaba Zokudla farm school event on technology at University of Johannesburg's Soweto campus.

IMG_0234.JPG

Mr. Emmanuel Gumbi, local artisan and experienced metalworker, stands with the prototype framework during construction.

shredder 105.JPG

Close-up showing the lower steel fabricated framework covered in orange and green stickers. Farmers were asked to comment by either 'liking = green' or 'disliking = orange' aspects of the design and or its functionality. One of the key focii of the product design has been ensuring that local artisans could manufacture and thus maintain shredder equipment for farmers.

shredder 090.JPG

Semi-structured focus group, farmers gathered around a pedal powered version at University of Johannesburg's Soweto campus during an Izindaba Zokudla farm school lecture

DSCN1754.JPG

Dr. Naude' Malan, speaking to a group of farmers during an Izindaba Zokudla farm school tour of successful farms in the Soweto area.

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Photo of Jeffrey Frusha
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I like it. I might need to make something similar for shredding cactus.